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I Eat Healthier Than You: Differences in Healthy and Unhealthy Food Choices for Oneself and for Others.

Sproesser G, Kohlbrenner V, Schupp H, Renner B - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that the typical meal for the self was more similar to the healthy than to the unhealthy meal in terms of energy content: The mean difference between the typical and healthy meals was MΔ = 1368 kJ (327 kcal) as compared to a mean difference between the typical and unhealthy meals of MΔ = 3075 kJ (735 kcal).Moreover, there was evidence that people apply asymmetrical standards for themselves and others: Participants chose more energy for a peer than for themselves (M = 4983 kJ or 1191 kcal on average for the peers' meals vs.This comparatively positive self-view is in stark contrast to epidemiological data indicating overall unhealthy eating habits and demands further examination of its consequences for behavior change.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychological Assessment and Health Psychology, University of Konstanz, P.O. Box 47, Konstanz 78457, Germany. gudrun.sproesser@uni-konstanz.de.

ABSTRACT
The present study investigated self-other biases in actual eating behavior based on the observation of three different eating situations. To capture the complexity of real life food choices within a well-controlled setting, an ecologically valid fake food buffet with 72 different foods was employed. Sixty participants chose a healthy, a typical, and an unhealthy meal for themselves and for an average peer. We found that the typical meal for the self was more similar to the healthy than to the unhealthy meal in terms of energy content: The mean difference between the typical and healthy meals was MΔ = 1368 kJ (327 kcal) as compared to a mean difference between the typical and unhealthy meals of MΔ = 3075 kJ (735 kcal). Moreover, there was evidence that people apply asymmetrical standards for themselves and others: Participants chose more energy for a peer than for themselves (M = 4983 kJ or 1191 kcal on average for the peers' meals vs. M = 3929 kJ or 939 kcal on average for the own meals) and more high-caloric food items for a typical meal, indicating a self-other bias. This comparatively positive self-view is in stark contrast to epidemiological data indicating overall unhealthy eating habits and demands further examination of its consequences for behavior change.

No MeSH data available.


Fake food buffet containing 72 different food items.
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nutrients-07-04638-f001: Fake food buffet containing 72 different food items.

Mentions: In order to investigate participants’ food choices, a buffet with replica food items was prepared (see Figure 1). The composition of the fake food buffet aimed to represent a typical lunch buffet. An exploratory pilot study was conducted. Six participants were instructed to put together a lunch meal for themselves and for an average person of the same age and gender, that is their peer, from a fake food buffet with 55 different food items (see [26]). Participants were questioned how typical the buffet was and which items were missing or overrepresented. Overall, they found the buffet to be realistic, to include a large selection of foods, and found it easy to choose meals. However, they suggested adding sauces, dessert mousses (e.g., pudding, quark), and a larger selection of salad items. In line with their remarks, the composition of the buffet was adapted. The final fake food buffet contained a salad buffet, a selection of main courses and side dishes, a dessert buffet, and drinks. In total, it included 72 different food items (see Figure 1 and Table A1, Appendix).


I Eat Healthier Than You: Differences in Healthy and Unhealthy Food Choices for Oneself and for Others.

Sproesser G, Kohlbrenner V, Schupp H, Renner B - Nutrients (2015)

Fake food buffet containing 72 different food items.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488806&req=5

nutrients-07-04638-f001: Fake food buffet containing 72 different food items.
Mentions: In order to investigate participants’ food choices, a buffet with replica food items was prepared (see Figure 1). The composition of the fake food buffet aimed to represent a typical lunch buffet. An exploratory pilot study was conducted. Six participants were instructed to put together a lunch meal for themselves and for an average person of the same age and gender, that is their peer, from a fake food buffet with 55 different food items (see [26]). Participants were questioned how typical the buffet was and which items were missing or overrepresented. Overall, they found the buffet to be realistic, to include a large selection of foods, and found it easy to choose meals. However, they suggested adding sauces, dessert mousses (e.g., pudding, quark), and a larger selection of salad items. In line with their remarks, the composition of the buffet was adapted. The final fake food buffet contained a salad buffet, a selection of main courses and side dishes, a dessert buffet, and drinks. In total, it included 72 different food items (see Figure 1 and Table A1, Appendix).

Bottom Line: We found that the typical meal for the self was more similar to the healthy than to the unhealthy meal in terms of energy content: The mean difference between the typical and healthy meals was MΔ = 1368 kJ (327 kcal) as compared to a mean difference between the typical and unhealthy meals of MΔ = 3075 kJ (735 kcal).Moreover, there was evidence that people apply asymmetrical standards for themselves and others: Participants chose more energy for a peer than for themselves (M = 4983 kJ or 1191 kcal on average for the peers' meals vs.This comparatively positive self-view is in stark contrast to epidemiological data indicating overall unhealthy eating habits and demands further examination of its consequences for behavior change.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychological Assessment and Health Psychology, University of Konstanz, P.O. Box 47, Konstanz 78457, Germany. gudrun.sproesser@uni-konstanz.de.

ABSTRACT
The present study investigated self-other biases in actual eating behavior based on the observation of three different eating situations. To capture the complexity of real life food choices within a well-controlled setting, an ecologically valid fake food buffet with 72 different foods was employed. Sixty participants chose a healthy, a typical, and an unhealthy meal for themselves and for an average peer. We found that the typical meal for the self was more similar to the healthy than to the unhealthy meal in terms of energy content: The mean difference between the typical and healthy meals was MΔ = 1368 kJ (327 kcal) as compared to a mean difference between the typical and unhealthy meals of MΔ = 3075 kJ (735 kcal). Moreover, there was evidence that people apply asymmetrical standards for themselves and others: Participants chose more energy for a peer than for themselves (M = 4983 kJ or 1191 kcal on average for the peers' meals vs. M = 3929 kJ or 939 kcal on average for the own meals) and more high-caloric food items for a typical meal, indicating a self-other bias. This comparatively positive self-view is in stark contrast to epidemiological data indicating overall unhealthy eating habits and demands further examination of its consequences for behavior change.

No MeSH data available.