Limits...
Contribution of Food Groups to Energy and Nutrient Intakes in Five Developed Countries.

Auestad N, Hurley JS, Fulgoni VL, Schweitzer CM - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Some differences were attributable to the analytical approach used by the surveys.For the meat/protein, milk and milk products, vegetables, and fruit groups, percent contributions to key nutrient intakes exceeded percent contributions to energy intake.This descriptive study contributes to an understanding of food group consumption patterns in developed countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dairy Research Institute/National Dairy Council, 10255 West Higgins Road, Suite 900, Rosemont, IL 60018, USA. nauestad@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Economic growth in developing countries and globalization of the food sector is leading to increasingly similar food consumption patterns worldwide. The aim of this study was to describe similarities and differences in the contributions of main food groups to energy and nutrient intakes in five developed countries across three continents. We obtained summary reports of national food consumption survey data from Australia, France, Denmark, the Netherlands, and the United States. Survey years spanned 2003-2012; sample size ranged from 1444 to 17,386. To mitigate heterogeneity of food groups across countries, we recategorized each survey's reported food groups and subgroups into eight main food groups and, for three countries, a ninth "mixed dishes" group. We determined the percent contribution of each food group to mean daily intakes of energy, saturated fat, sodium, fiber, and ten vitamins and minerals that are commonly under-consumed. Differences in findings from surveys utilizing a foods-as-consumed versus a disaggregated or ingredients approach to food group composition and contributions from the milk and milk products group, a source of several under-consumed nutrients, were explored. Patterns of food group contributions to energy and nutrient intakes were generally similar across countries. Some differences were attributable to the analytical approach used by the surveys. For the meat/protein, milk and milk products, vegetables, and fruit groups, percent contributions to key nutrient intakes exceeded percent contributions to energy intake. The mixed dishes group provided 10%-20% of total daily energy and a similar 10%-25% of the daily intake of several nutrients. This descriptive study contributes to an understanding of food group consumption patterns in developed countries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Contribution of milk, cheese and other dairy products consumed as individual foods to energy and selected nutrient intakes in children and adults in Australia, the United States and France.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488804&req=5

nutrients-07-04593-f002: Contribution of milk, cheese and other dairy products consumed as individual foods to energy and selected nutrient intakes in children and adults in Australia, the United States and France.

Mentions: Because the milk and milk products group is an important source of several nutrients of interest and its nutrient contributions are partially obscured in surveys that use the foods-as-consumed approach, we examined its role in the diets of adults and children in three countries more closely (Figure 2). The nutrients in Figure 2 were selected from the nutrients we identified as commonly under- or over-consumed and for which milk and other dairy products are important contributors.


Contribution of Food Groups to Energy and Nutrient Intakes in Five Developed Countries.

Auestad N, Hurley JS, Fulgoni VL, Schweitzer CM - Nutrients (2015)

Contribution of milk, cheese and other dairy products consumed as individual foods to energy and selected nutrient intakes in children and adults in Australia, the United States and France.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488804&req=5

nutrients-07-04593-f002: Contribution of milk, cheese and other dairy products consumed as individual foods to energy and selected nutrient intakes in children and adults in Australia, the United States and France.
Mentions: Because the milk and milk products group is an important source of several nutrients of interest and its nutrient contributions are partially obscured in surveys that use the foods-as-consumed approach, we examined its role in the diets of adults and children in three countries more closely (Figure 2). The nutrients in Figure 2 were selected from the nutrients we identified as commonly under- or over-consumed and for which milk and other dairy products are important contributors.

Bottom Line: Some differences were attributable to the analytical approach used by the surveys.For the meat/protein, milk and milk products, vegetables, and fruit groups, percent contributions to key nutrient intakes exceeded percent contributions to energy intake.This descriptive study contributes to an understanding of food group consumption patterns in developed countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dairy Research Institute/National Dairy Council, 10255 West Higgins Road, Suite 900, Rosemont, IL 60018, USA. nauestad@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Economic growth in developing countries and globalization of the food sector is leading to increasingly similar food consumption patterns worldwide. The aim of this study was to describe similarities and differences in the contributions of main food groups to energy and nutrient intakes in five developed countries across three continents. We obtained summary reports of national food consumption survey data from Australia, France, Denmark, the Netherlands, and the United States. Survey years spanned 2003-2012; sample size ranged from 1444 to 17,386. To mitigate heterogeneity of food groups across countries, we recategorized each survey's reported food groups and subgroups into eight main food groups and, for three countries, a ninth "mixed dishes" group. We determined the percent contribution of each food group to mean daily intakes of energy, saturated fat, sodium, fiber, and ten vitamins and minerals that are commonly under-consumed. Differences in findings from surveys utilizing a foods-as-consumed versus a disaggregated or ingredients approach to food group composition and contributions from the milk and milk products group, a source of several under-consumed nutrients, were explored. Patterns of food group contributions to energy and nutrient intakes were generally similar across countries. Some differences were attributable to the analytical approach used by the surveys. For the meat/protein, milk and milk products, vegetables, and fruit groups, percent contributions to key nutrient intakes exceeded percent contributions to energy intake. The mixed dishes group provided 10%-20% of total daily energy and a similar 10%-25% of the daily intake of several nutrients. This descriptive study contributes to an understanding of food group consumption patterns in developed countries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus