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Long-Term Supplementation with Beta Serum Concentrate (BSC), a Complex of Milk Lipids, during Post-Natal Brain Development Improves Memory in Rats.

Guan J, MacGibbon A, Fong B, Zhang R, Liu K, Rowan A, McJarrow P - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Supplementation improved memory by showing reduced latency and improved path efficiency to the platform quadrant, and smaller initial heading error from the platform zone.Thus BSC supplementation during post-natal brain development improved learning and memory, independent from anxiety.The moderately enhanced neuroplasticity in dopamine and glutamate may be biological changes underlying the improved cognitive function.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, 85 Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 1142 , New Zealand. j.guan@auckland.ac.nz.

ABSTRACT
We have previously reported that the supplementation of ganglioside-enriched complex-milk-lipids improves cognitive function and that a phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipid prevents age-related cognitive decline in rats. This current study evaluated the effects of post-natal supplementation of ganglioside- and phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipids beta serum concentrate (BSC) on cognitive function in young rats. The diet of male rats was supplemented with either gels formulated BSC (n = 16) or blank gels (n = 16) from post-natal day 10 to day 70. Memory and anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated using the Morris water maze, dark-light boxes, and elevated plus maze tests. Neuroplasticity and white matter were measured using immunohistochemical staining. The overall performance in seven-day acquisition trials was similar between the groups. Compared with the control group, BSC supplementation reduced the latency to the platform during day one of the acquisition tests. Supplementation improved memory by showing reduced latency and improved path efficiency to the platform quadrant, and smaller initial heading error from the platform zone. Supplemented rats showed an increase in striatal dopamine terminals and hippocampal glutamate receptors. Thus BSC supplementation during post-natal brain development improved learning and memory, independent from anxiety. The moderately enhanced neuroplasticity in dopamine and glutamate may be biological changes underlying the improved cognitive function.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

MWM performance in testing trials evaluated at 24, 48, and 72 h after the acquisition tests. The memory retention was analyzed using the latency to (A) and the path efficacy to the targeted quadrant (B) the targeted quadrant and the initial heading error from the platform zoon (C). The data are presented as mean ± SEM, n = 16, BG = blank gel, *p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01.
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nutrients-07-04526-f004: MWM performance in testing trials evaluated at 24, 48, and 72 h after the acquisition tests. The memory retention was analyzed using the latency to (A) and the path efficacy to the targeted quadrant (B) the targeted quadrant and the initial heading error from the platform zoon (C). The data are presented as mean ± SEM, n = 16, BG = blank gel, *p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01.

Mentions: The test trials were conducted during PN day 63–65. Memory retention was evaluated at 24, 48, and 72 h after the last acquisition trial. Figure 4 shows (A) the latency of first entry, (B) the initial heading error towards the platform zone, and (C) the path efficiency to the target quadrant. Two-way ANOVA showed that the latency of first entry to the target quadrant was significantly reduced in the BSC group compared with the control group (Figure 4A, p = 0.0027, F (1,87) = 9.5). There was no difference between the time points and no interactions between the groups and the time points. The multiple comparisons suggested that the latency was significantly reduced at both 48 and 72 h (Figure 4A, p < 0.05).


Long-Term Supplementation with Beta Serum Concentrate (BSC), a Complex of Milk Lipids, during Post-Natal Brain Development Improves Memory in Rats.

Guan J, MacGibbon A, Fong B, Zhang R, Liu K, Rowan A, McJarrow P - Nutrients (2015)

MWM performance in testing trials evaluated at 24, 48, and 72 h after the acquisition tests. The memory retention was analyzed using the latency to (A) and the path efficacy to the targeted quadrant (B) the targeted quadrant and the initial heading error from the platform zoon (C). The data are presented as mean ± SEM, n = 16, BG = blank gel, *p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488800&req=5

nutrients-07-04526-f004: MWM performance in testing trials evaluated at 24, 48, and 72 h after the acquisition tests. The memory retention was analyzed using the latency to (A) and the path efficacy to the targeted quadrant (B) the targeted quadrant and the initial heading error from the platform zoon (C). The data are presented as mean ± SEM, n = 16, BG = blank gel, *p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01.
Mentions: The test trials were conducted during PN day 63–65. Memory retention was evaluated at 24, 48, and 72 h after the last acquisition trial. Figure 4 shows (A) the latency of first entry, (B) the initial heading error towards the platform zone, and (C) the path efficiency to the target quadrant. Two-way ANOVA showed that the latency of first entry to the target quadrant was significantly reduced in the BSC group compared with the control group (Figure 4A, p = 0.0027, F (1,87) = 9.5). There was no difference between the time points and no interactions between the groups and the time points. The multiple comparisons suggested that the latency was significantly reduced at both 48 and 72 h (Figure 4A, p < 0.05).

Bottom Line: Supplementation improved memory by showing reduced latency and improved path efficiency to the platform quadrant, and smaller initial heading error from the platform zone.Thus BSC supplementation during post-natal brain development improved learning and memory, independent from anxiety.The moderately enhanced neuroplasticity in dopamine and glutamate may be biological changes underlying the improved cognitive function.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, 85 Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 1142 , New Zealand. j.guan@auckland.ac.nz.

ABSTRACT
We have previously reported that the supplementation of ganglioside-enriched complex-milk-lipids improves cognitive function and that a phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipid prevents age-related cognitive decline in rats. This current study evaluated the effects of post-natal supplementation of ganglioside- and phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipids beta serum concentrate (BSC) on cognitive function in young rats. The diet of male rats was supplemented with either gels formulated BSC (n = 16) or blank gels (n = 16) from post-natal day 10 to day 70. Memory and anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated using the Morris water maze, dark-light boxes, and elevated plus maze tests. Neuroplasticity and white matter were measured using immunohistochemical staining. The overall performance in seven-day acquisition trials was similar between the groups. Compared with the control group, BSC supplementation reduced the latency to the platform during day one of the acquisition tests. Supplementation improved memory by showing reduced latency and improved path efficiency to the platform quadrant, and smaller initial heading error from the platform zone. Supplemented rats showed an increase in striatal dopamine terminals and hippocampal glutamate receptors. Thus BSC supplementation during post-natal brain development improved learning and memory, independent from anxiety. The moderately enhanced neuroplasticity in dopamine and glutamate may be biological changes underlying the improved cognitive function.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus