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Prebiotics Modulate the Effects of Antibiotics on Gut Microbial Diversity and Functioning in Vitro.

Johnson LP, Walton GE, Psichas A, Frost GS, Gibson GR, Barraclough TG - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Cultures were supplemented with either pectin (a non-fermentable fibre), inulin (a commonly used prebiotic that promotes the growth of beneficial bacteria) or neither.There is therefore potential for using supplements to lessen the adverse effects of antibiotics.Further knowledge of such mechanisms could lead to better therapeutic manipulation of the human gut microbiota.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berkshire, SL5 7PY, UK. L.johnson12@imperial.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Intestinal bacteria carry out many fundamental roles, such as the fermentation of non-digestible dietary carbohydrates to produce short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which can affect host energy levels and gut hormone regulation. Understanding how to manage this ecosystem to improve human health is an important but challenging goal. Antibiotics are the front line of defence against pathogens, but in turn they have adverse effects on indigenous microbial diversity and function. Here, we have investigated whether dietary supplementation--another method used to modulate gut composition and function--could be used to ameliorate the side effects of antibiotics. We perturbed gut bacterial communities with gentamicin and ampicillin in anaerobic batch cultures in vitro. Cultures were supplemented with either pectin (a non-fermentable fibre), inulin (a commonly used prebiotic that promotes the growth of beneficial bacteria) or neither. Although antibiotics often negated the beneficial effects of dietary supplementation, in some treatment combinations, notably ampicillin and inulin, dietary supplementation ameliorated the effects of antibiotics. There is therefore potential for using supplements to lessen the adverse effects of antibiotics. Further knowledge of such mechanisms could lead to better therapeutic manipulation of the human gut microbiota.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in the abundance of total bacteria (A) to (C), Bacteroides (D) to (F) and Bifidobacterium (G) to (I) as determined by FISH counts during the course of the experiment. Columns show results with no antibiotics ((A, D, G), solid lines), gentamicin ((B, E, H), dashed lines) and ampicillin ((C, F, I), dotted lines) in turn. Standard error bars are shown. Black = control; green = inulin; red = pectin. Total (total bacterial abundance), Bacteroides (Bac), Bifidobacterium (Bif). Averages across volunteers are shown.
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nutrients-07-04480-f002: Changes in the abundance of total bacteria (A) to (C), Bacteroides (D) to (F) and Bifidobacterium (G) to (I) as determined by FISH counts during the course of the experiment. Columns show results with no antibiotics ((A, D, G), solid lines), gentamicin ((B, E, H), dashed lines) and ampicillin ((C, F, I), dotted lines) in turn. Standard error bars are shown. Black = control; green = inulin; red = pectin. Total (total bacterial abundance), Bacteroides (Bac), Bifidobacterium (Bif). Averages across volunteers are shown.

Mentions: Supplementation with inulin and pectin led to a significant increase in total bacterial numbers relative to control medium (Figure 2A, F2,22 = 3.86, p = 0.037, Table 1). Antibiotic treatment decreased cell numbers. The impact of gentamicin was sustained over 30 h (Figure 2B), whereas ampicillin reduced numbers over 10 h, but growth recovered later in the experiment (Figure 2C, interaction between antibiotic and quadratic time, F4,75 = 4.58, p = 0.0023, Table 1). There was no significant interaction between the effects of fermentable fibre and antibiotics on total cell counts.


Prebiotics Modulate the Effects of Antibiotics on Gut Microbial Diversity and Functioning in Vitro.

Johnson LP, Walton GE, Psichas A, Frost GS, Gibson GR, Barraclough TG - Nutrients (2015)

Changes in the abundance of total bacteria (A) to (C), Bacteroides (D) to (F) and Bifidobacterium (G) to (I) as determined by FISH counts during the course of the experiment. Columns show results with no antibiotics ((A, D, G), solid lines), gentamicin ((B, E, H), dashed lines) and ampicillin ((C, F, I), dotted lines) in turn. Standard error bars are shown. Black = control; green = inulin; red = pectin. Total (total bacterial abundance), Bacteroides (Bac), Bifidobacterium (Bif). Averages across volunteers are shown.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488797&req=5

nutrients-07-04480-f002: Changes in the abundance of total bacteria (A) to (C), Bacteroides (D) to (F) and Bifidobacterium (G) to (I) as determined by FISH counts during the course of the experiment. Columns show results with no antibiotics ((A, D, G), solid lines), gentamicin ((B, E, H), dashed lines) and ampicillin ((C, F, I), dotted lines) in turn. Standard error bars are shown. Black = control; green = inulin; red = pectin. Total (total bacterial abundance), Bacteroides (Bac), Bifidobacterium (Bif). Averages across volunteers are shown.
Mentions: Supplementation with inulin and pectin led to a significant increase in total bacterial numbers relative to control medium (Figure 2A, F2,22 = 3.86, p = 0.037, Table 1). Antibiotic treatment decreased cell numbers. The impact of gentamicin was sustained over 30 h (Figure 2B), whereas ampicillin reduced numbers over 10 h, but growth recovered later in the experiment (Figure 2C, interaction between antibiotic and quadratic time, F4,75 = 4.58, p = 0.0023, Table 1). There was no significant interaction between the effects of fermentable fibre and antibiotics on total cell counts.

Bottom Line: Cultures were supplemented with either pectin (a non-fermentable fibre), inulin (a commonly used prebiotic that promotes the growth of beneficial bacteria) or neither.There is therefore potential for using supplements to lessen the adverse effects of antibiotics.Further knowledge of such mechanisms could lead to better therapeutic manipulation of the human gut microbiota.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berkshire, SL5 7PY, UK. L.johnson12@imperial.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Intestinal bacteria carry out many fundamental roles, such as the fermentation of non-digestible dietary carbohydrates to produce short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which can affect host energy levels and gut hormone regulation. Understanding how to manage this ecosystem to improve human health is an important but challenging goal. Antibiotics are the front line of defence against pathogens, but in turn they have adverse effects on indigenous microbial diversity and function. Here, we have investigated whether dietary supplementation--another method used to modulate gut composition and function--could be used to ameliorate the side effects of antibiotics. We perturbed gut bacterial communities with gentamicin and ampicillin in anaerobic batch cultures in vitro. Cultures were supplemented with either pectin (a non-fermentable fibre), inulin (a commonly used prebiotic that promotes the growth of beneficial bacteria) or neither. Although antibiotics often negated the beneficial effects of dietary supplementation, in some treatment combinations, notably ampicillin and inulin, dietary supplementation ameliorated the effects of antibiotics. There is therefore potential for using supplements to lessen the adverse effects of antibiotics. Further knowledge of such mechanisms could lead to better therapeutic manipulation of the human gut microbiota.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus