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Feasibility and Use of the Mobile Food Record for Capturing Eating Occasions among Children Ages 3-10 Years in Guam.

Aflague TF, Boushey CJ, Guerrero RT, Ahmad Z, Kerr DA, Delp EJ - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Our goal was to determine if children 3-10 years could successfully use the mobile food record (mFR) to capture a usable image pair or pairs.Children in Sample 2 used the mFR at least one day at Time 1 (59/63, 94%); Time 2 (49/63, 78%); and at both times (47/63, 75%).Results support the potential for children to independently record dietary intakes using the mFR.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Nutrition, Food, and Animal Sciences University of Hawaii at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI96822, USA. franquez@hawaii.edu.

ABSTRACT
Children's readiness to use technology supports the idea of children using mobile applications for dietary assessment. Our goal was to determine if children 3-10 years could successfully use the mobile food record (mFR) to capture a usable image pair or pairs. Children in Sample 1 were tasked to use the mFR to capture an image pair of one eating occasion while attending summer camp. For Sample 2, children were tasked to record all eating occasions for two consecutive days at two time periods that were two to four weeks apart. Trained analysts evaluated images. In Sample 1, 90% (57/63) captured one usable image pair. All children (63/63) returned the mFR undamaged. Sixty-two children reported: The mFR was easy to use (89%); willingness to use the mFR again (87%); and the fiducial marker easy to manage (94%). Children in Sample 2 used the mFR at least one day at Time 1 (59/63, 94%); Time 2 (49/63, 78%); and at both times (47/63, 75%). This latter group captured 6.21 ± 4.65 and 5.65 ± 3.26 mean (± SD) image pairs for Time 1 and Time 2, respectively. Results support the potential for children to independently record dietary intakes using the mFR.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Representation of children’s demonstration of skill set 1 for capturing, at least, one usable image pair (n = 57) among Sample 1 in Guam during summer 2013.
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nutrients-07-04403-f003: Representation of children’s demonstration of skill set 1 for capturing, at least, one usable image pair (n = 57) among Sample 1 in Guam during summer 2013.

Mentions: Skill set 1 was evaluated in Sample 1. For the task of taking, at least, one image pair of an eating occasion, or the practice image, two image pairs were lost because of technical errors and four image pairs were excluded as four children took only a before or an after image. Therefore, 95% (57/63) were able to demonstrate taking one image pair as shown in Table 2. Of these children, at least 70% (40/57) had the FM present, 95% (54/57) had the food and beverages present, and 70% (40/57) had both in the before and after images (Figure 3). With regard to capturing one image pair, boys were less likely to take an image pair (χ2 = 5.755, p = 0.026) than girls. Although children were tasked to take only one image pair, some children captured more than one image pair when they possessed the mFR longer (Table 2). Thirty percent (17/57) took two image pairs and 37% (21/57) took three to four image pairs. Of those that took two or more image pairs (n = 38), 68% (26/38) were girls and 32% (12/38) were boys. There were no significant differences found between younger (3–6 years) and older (7–10 years) age groups for capturing one image pair and this was also true accounting for more than one image pair. However, boys were more likely to miss including the FM (χ2 = 5.216, df = 1, p = 0.022), food and/or beverages (χ2 = 5.292, df = 1, Fisher’s exact 0.045), or both (χ2 = 5.216, df = 1, p = 0.022). This significant difference in usable image pairs was primarily due to no after image captured.


Feasibility and Use of the Mobile Food Record for Capturing Eating Occasions among Children Ages 3-10 Years in Guam.

Aflague TF, Boushey CJ, Guerrero RT, Ahmad Z, Kerr DA, Delp EJ - Nutrients (2015)

Representation of children’s demonstration of skill set 1 for capturing, at least, one usable image pair (n = 57) among Sample 1 in Guam during summer 2013.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488791&req=5

nutrients-07-04403-f003: Representation of children’s demonstration of skill set 1 for capturing, at least, one usable image pair (n = 57) among Sample 1 in Guam during summer 2013.
Mentions: Skill set 1 was evaluated in Sample 1. For the task of taking, at least, one image pair of an eating occasion, or the practice image, two image pairs were lost because of technical errors and four image pairs were excluded as four children took only a before or an after image. Therefore, 95% (57/63) were able to demonstrate taking one image pair as shown in Table 2. Of these children, at least 70% (40/57) had the FM present, 95% (54/57) had the food and beverages present, and 70% (40/57) had both in the before and after images (Figure 3). With regard to capturing one image pair, boys were less likely to take an image pair (χ2 = 5.755, p = 0.026) than girls. Although children were tasked to take only one image pair, some children captured more than one image pair when they possessed the mFR longer (Table 2). Thirty percent (17/57) took two image pairs and 37% (21/57) took three to four image pairs. Of those that took two or more image pairs (n = 38), 68% (26/38) were girls and 32% (12/38) were boys. There were no significant differences found between younger (3–6 years) and older (7–10 years) age groups for capturing one image pair and this was also true accounting for more than one image pair. However, boys were more likely to miss including the FM (χ2 = 5.216, df = 1, p = 0.022), food and/or beverages (χ2 = 5.292, df = 1, Fisher’s exact 0.045), or both (χ2 = 5.216, df = 1, p = 0.022). This significant difference in usable image pairs was primarily due to no after image captured.

Bottom Line: Our goal was to determine if children 3-10 years could successfully use the mobile food record (mFR) to capture a usable image pair or pairs.Children in Sample 2 used the mFR at least one day at Time 1 (59/63, 94%); Time 2 (49/63, 78%); and at both times (47/63, 75%).Results support the potential for children to independently record dietary intakes using the mFR.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Nutrition, Food, and Animal Sciences University of Hawaii at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI96822, USA. franquez@hawaii.edu.

ABSTRACT
Children's readiness to use technology supports the idea of children using mobile applications for dietary assessment. Our goal was to determine if children 3-10 years could successfully use the mobile food record (mFR) to capture a usable image pair or pairs. Children in Sample 1 were tasked to use the mFR to capture an image pair of one eating occasion while attending summer camp. For Sample 2, children were tasked to record all eating occasions for two consecutive days at two time periods that were two to four weeks apart. Trained analysts evaluated images. In Sample 1, 90% (57/63) captured one usable image pair. All children (63/63) returned the mFR undamaged. Sixty-two children reported: The mFR was easy to use (89%); willingness to use the mFR again (87%); and the fiducial marker easy to manage (94%). Children in Sample 2 used the mFR at least one day at Time 1 (59/63, 94%); Time 2 (49/63, 78%); and at both times (47/63, 75%). This latter group captured 6.21 ± 4.65 and 5.65 ± 3.26 mean (± SD) image pairs for Time 1 and Time 2, respectively. Results support the potential for children to independently record dietary intakes using the mFR.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus