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Do Overweight Adolescents Adhere to Dietary Intervention Messages? Twelve-Month Detailed Dietary Outcomes from Curtin University's Activity, Food and Attitudes Program.

Smith KL, Kerr DA, Howie EK, Straker LM - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: During the intervention, energy intake was stable but favorable nutrient changes occurred.During the 12 month maintenance period; self-reported eating behaviors improved, energy intake remained stable but dietary fat and saturated fat intake gradually returned to baseline levels.Discrepancies between outcomes from brief dietary assessment methods and three-day food records show differences between perceived and actual intake, highlighting the need for detailed dietary reporting.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth 6845, Australia. kyla.smith@curtin.edu.au.

ABSTRACT
Dietary components of adolescent obesity interventions are rarely evaluated with comprehensive reporting of dietary change. The objective was to assess dietary change in overweight adolescents, including adherence to dietary intervention. The dietary intervention was part of a multi-component intervention (CAFAP) targeting the physical activity, sedentary and healthy eating behaviors of overweight adolescents (n = 69). CAFAP was a staggered entry, within-subject, waitlist controlled clinical trial with 12 months of follow up. Diet was assessed using three-day food records and a brief eating behavior questionnaire. Changes in dietary outcomes were assessed using linear mixed models, adjusted for underreporting. Food record data suggested reduced adherence to dietary intervention messages over time following the intervention, despite conflicting information from the brief eating behavior questionnaire. During the intervention, energy intake was stable but favorable nutrient changes occurred. During the 12 month maintenance period; self-reported eating behaviors improved, energy intake remained stable but dietary fat and saturated fat intake gradually returned to baseline levels. Discrepancies between outcomes from brief dietary assessment methods and three-day food records show differences between perceived and actual intake, highlighting the need for detailed dietary reporting. Further, adherence to dietary intervention principles reduces over time, indicating a need for better maintenance support.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Participant numbers and food record completion during the waitlist controlled trial of Curtin University’s Activity, Food, and Attitudes Program.
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nutrients-07-04363-f001: Participant numbers and food record completion during the waitlist controlled trial of Curtin University’s Activity, Food, and Attitudes Program.

Mentions: This study was a multiple cohort, staggered-entry, waitlist period controlled clinical trial conducted at three sites in Western Australia (two metropolitan areas and one regional area) [20]. Briefly, overweight adolescents were recruited and assessed three months before the eight-week intensive phase of the intervention commenced, and assessed again immediately prior to the intervention. This method was chosen because it was considered unfair to withhold services from obese adolescents in view of the lack of appropriate treatment services available [21], and the dual pre-participation assessments allowed for a within-subjects control period. The staggered start for the seven cohort groups controlled for external seasonal and public event confounders to intervention effects. Further assessments were completed at the immediate conclusion of the eight-week program and again at three months, six months and 12 months post-intervention [20]. This trial was registered on the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12611001187932). Figure 1 shows the progression of participants through the 17 months of the study. Each assessment time point is represented by a box on the left of the figure. In each box, the bold number refers to the number of adolescents potentially still available for each assessment, with the number of drop outs clearly stated on the right of the figure.


Do Overweight Adolescents Adhere to Dietary Intervention Messages? Twelve-Month Detailed Dietary Outcomes from Curtin University's Activity, Food and Attitudes Program.

Smith KL, Kerr DA, Howie EK, Straker LM - Nutrients (2015)

Participant numbers and food record completion during the waitlist controlled trial of Curtin University’s Activity, Food, and Attitudes Program.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488789&req=5

nutrients-07-04363-f001: Participant numbers and food record completion during the waitlist controlled trial of Curtin University’s Activity, Food, and Attitudes Program.
Mentions: This study was a multiple cohort, staggered-entry, waitlist period controlled clinical trial conducted at three sites in Western Australia (two metropolitan areas and one regional area) [20]. Briefly, overweight adolescents were recruited and assessed three months before the eight-week intensive phase of the intervention commenced, and assessed again immediately prior to the intervention. This method was chosen because it was considered unfair to withhold services from obese adolescents in view of the lack of appropriate treatment services available [21], and the dual pre-participation assessments allowed for a within-subjects control period. The staggered start for the seven cohort groups controlled for external seasonal and public event confounders to intervention effects. Further assessments were completed at the immediate conclusion of the eight-week program and again at three months, six months and 12 months post-intervention [20]. This trial was registered on the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12611001187932). Figure 1 shows the progression of participants through the 17 months of the study. Each assessment time point is represented by a box on the left of the figure. In each box, the bold number refers to the number of adolescents potentially still available for each assessment, with the number of drop outs clearly stated on the right of the figure.

Bottom Line: During the intervention, energy intake was stable but favorable nutrient changes occurred.During the 12 month maintenance period; self-reported eating behaviors improved, energy intake remained stable but dietary fat and saturated fat intake gradually returned to baseline levels.Discrepancies between outcomes from brief dietary assessment methods and three-day food records show differences between perceived and actual intake, highlighting the need for detailed dietary reporting.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth 6845, Australia. kyla.smith@curtin.edu.au.

ABSTRACT
Dietary components of adolescent obesity interventions are rarely evaluated with comprehensive reporting of dietary change. The objective was to assess dietary change in overweight adolescents, including adherence to dietary intervention. The dietary intervention was part of a multi-component intervention (CAFAP) targeting the physical activity, sedentary and healthy eating behaviors of overweight adolescents (n = 69). CAFAP was a staggered entry, within-subject, waitlist controlled clinical trial with 12 months of follow up. Diet was assessed using three-day food records and a brief eating behavior questionnaire. Changes in dietary outcomes were assessed using linear mixed models, adjusted for underreporting. Food record data suggested reduced adherence to dietary intervention messages over time following the intervention, despite conflicting information from the brief eating behavior questionnaire. During the intervention, energy intake was stable but favorable nutrient changes occurred. During the 12 month maintenance period; self-reported eating behaviors improved, energy intake remained stable but dietary fat and saturated fat intake gradually returned to baseline levels. Discrepancies between outcomes from brief dietary assessment methods and three-day food records show differences between perceived and actual intake, highlighting the need for detailed dietary reporting. Further, adherence to dietary intervention principles reduces over time, indicating a need for better maintenance support.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus