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Dissemination of multiple carbapenem-resistant clones of Acinetobacter baumannii in the Eastern District of Saudi Arabia.

Al-Sultan AA, Evans BA, Aboulmagd E, Al-Qahtani AA, Bohol MF, Al-Ahdal MN, Opazo AF, Amyes SG - Front Microbiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Carbapenem resistance or intermediate resistance was detected in 69% of isolates.The bla VIM gene was detected in 94% of isolates, while bla OXA-23-like genes were detected in 58%.The data demonstrate the co-existence and wide distribution of a number of clones of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii carrying multiple carbapenem-resistance determinants within hospitals in the Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Medicine, King Faisal University , Al Ahsa, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
It has previously been shown that carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii are frequently detected in Saudi Arabia. The present study aimed to identify the epidemiology and distribution of antibiotic resistance determinants in these bacteria. A total of 83 A. baumannii isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and screened by PCR for carbapenemase genes and insertion sequences. Antibiotic sensitivity to imipenem, meropenem, tigecycline, and colistin were determined. Eight different PFGE groups were identified, and were spread across multiple hospitals. Many of the PFGE groups contained isolates belonging to World-wide clone 2. Carbapenem resistance or intermediate resistance was detected in 69% of isolates. The bla VIM gene was detected in 94% of isolates, while bla OXA-23-like genes were detected in 58%. The data demonstrate the co-existence and wide distribution of a number of clones of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii carrying multiple carbapenem-resistance determinants within hospitals in the Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia.

No MeSH data available.


Maximum likelihood phylogeny based upon amino-acid sequences of OXA-51-like enzymes. Enzymes that were encoded by isolates in the present study are highlighted in red. The phylogeny is mid-point rooted, with support for the branches estimated from 100 bootstraps.
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Figure 3: Maximum likelihood phylogeny based upon amino-acid sequences of OXA-51-like enzymes. Enzymes that were encoded by isolates in the present study are highlighted in red. The phylogeny is mid-point rooted, with support for the branches estimated from 100 bootstraps.

Mentions: Sequencing of the blaOXA–51–like alleles identified the presence of the blaOXA–66 allele in 54 isolates (65%), with the remaining 29 isolates encoding one of 15 other OXA-51-like enzymes (Figures 1 and 3). Isolates carrying a blaOXA–66 allele were considered to belong to the World-wide clone 2 (WW2) lineage (Evans et al., 2008; Higgins et al., 2009). Isolates belonging to one of the PFGE groups were more likely to encode a blaOXA–66 allele, while isolates that were not grouped were more likely to encode a non-blaOXA–66 allele (Mann Whitney U test, Z = –2.981, p = 0.012 following correction). In addition there was a significant difference in the association of ISAba1 with blaOXA–51–like alleles, with the insertion sequence found significantly more often upstream of blaOXA–66 alleles than non-blaOXA–66 alleles (Mann Whitney U test, Z = –3.171, p = 0.011 following correction).


Dissemination of multiple carbapenem-resistant clones of Acinetobacter baumannii in the Eastern District of Saudi Arabia.

Al-Sultan AA, Evans BA, Aboulmagd E, Al-Qahtani AA, Bohol MF, Al-Ahdal MN, Opazo AF, Amyes SG - Front Microbiol (2015)

Maximum likelihood phylogeny based upon amino-acid sequences of OXA-51-like enzymes. Enzymes that were encoded by isolates in the present study are highlighted in red. The phylogeny is mid-point rooted, with support for the branches estimated from 100 bootstraps.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488750&req=5

Figure 3: Maximum likelihood phylogeny based upon amino-acid sequences of OXA-51-like enzymes. Enzymes that were encoded by isolates in the present study are highlighted in red. The phylogeny is mid-point rooted, with support for the branches estimated from 100 bootstraps.
Mentions: Sequencing of the blaOXA–51–like alleles identified the presence of the blaOXA–66 allele in 54 isolates (65%), with the remaining 29 isolates encoding one of 15 other OXA-51-like enzymes (Figures 1 and 3). Isolates carrying a blaOXA–66 allele were considered to belong to the World-wide clone 2 (WW2) lineage (Evans et al., 2008; Higgins et al., 2009). Isolates belonging to one of the PFGE groups were more likely to encode a blaOXA–66 allele, while isolates that were not grouped were more likely to encode a non-blaOXA–66 allele (Mann Whitney U test, Z = –2.981, p = 0.012 following correction). In addition there was a significant difference in the association of ISAba1 with blaOXA–51–like alleles, with the insertion sequence found significantly more often upstream of blaOXA–66 alleles than non-blaOXA–66 alleles (Mann Whitney U test, Z = –3.171, p = 0.011 following correction).

Bottom Line: Carbapenem resistance or intermediate resistance was detected in 69% of isolates.The bla VIM gene was detected in 94% of isolates, while bla OXA-23-like genes were detected in 58%.The data demonstrate the co-existence and wide distribution of a number of clones of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii carrying multiple carbapenem-resistance determinants within hospitals in the Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Medicine, King Faisal University , Al Ahsa, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
It has previously been shown that carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii are frequently detected in Saudi Arabia. The present study aimed to identify the epidemiology and distribution of antibiotic resistance determinants in these bacteria. A total of 83 A. baumannii isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and screened by PCR for carbapenemase genes and insertion sequences. Antibiotic sensitivity to imipenem, meropenem, tigecycline, and colistin were determined. Eight different PFGE groups were identified, and were spread across multiple hospitals. Many of the PFGE groups contained isolates belonging to World-wide clone 2. Carbapenem resistance or intermediate resistance was detected in 69% of isolates. The bla VIM gene was detected in 94% of isolates, while bla OXA-23-like genes were detected in 58%. The data demonstrate the co-existence and wide distribution of a number of clones of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii carrying multiple carbapenem-resistance determinants within hospitals in the Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia.

No MeSH data available.