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Chronic Sublethal Effects of Cantharidin on the Diamondback Moth Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae).

Huang Z, Zhang Y - Toxins (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: In addition, repeated exposure of P. xylostella to sublethal concentration of cantharidin resulted in negative effects on adult performance and deformities in adults.Our results showed that sublethal concentration of cantharidin exhibited severe negative effects on population growth for longtime.These findings would be useful for assessing the potential effects and risk of cantharidin on P. xylostella and for developing effective integrated pest management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Plant Protection Resources and Pest Management of the Ministry of Education, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi, China. huangzy0503@163.com.

ABSTRACT
The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), is a major pest of cruciferous vegetables worldwide. Cantharidin, a natural toxin isolated from blister beetles, has been reported to be toxic to P. xylostella. However, little is known on the chronic sublethal effects of cantharidin on this species. In this study, we assessed the changes of susceptibility, development, reproduction and other demographic parameters in both the selected P. xylostella strain (Sub, selected by LC25 cantharidin for consecutive 12 generations) and the revertant strain (SubR, derived from the Sub strain without being exposed to cantharidin for 12 generations). Results revealed that the two strains maintained a relatively high-level susceptibility to cantharidin. Severe adverse effects on the population dynamics and fitness in Sub strain were observed. In addition, repeated exposure of P. xylostella to sublethal concentration of cantharidin resulted in negative effects on adult performance and deformities in adults. Although morphologically normal for individuals, the SubR strain exhibited a disadvantage in population growth rate. Our results showed that sublethal concentration of cantharidin exhibited severe negative effects on population growth for longtime. These findings would be useful for assessing the potential effects and risk of cantharidin on P. xylostella and for developing effective integrated pest management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Various morphological abnormalities in treated Plutella xylostella with sublethal concentration of cantharidin. (A) normal adult; (B) miniature crippled wings in adult; (C,D) twisted wings in adults.
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toxins-07-01962-f003: Various morphological abnormalities in treated Plutella xylostella with sublethal concentration of cantharidin. (A) normal adult; (B) miniature crippled wings in adult; (C,D) twisted wings in adults.

Mentions: Malformation and abnormalities of adults were noticed in the cantharidin treatment (Figure 3) and this progressively became more apparent as the number of sublethal selection cycles increased (Figure 4).


Chronic Sublethal Effects of Cantharidin on the Diamondback Moth Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae).

Huang Z, Zhang Y - Toxins (Basel) (2015)

Various morphological abnormalities in treated Plutella xylostella with sublethal concentration of cantharidin. (A) normal adult; (B) miniature crippled wings in adult; (C,D) twisted wings in adults.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488684&req=5

toxins-07-01962-f003: Various morphological abnormalities in treated Plutella xylostella with sublethal concentration of cantharidin. (A) normal adult; (B) miniature crippled wings in adult; (C,D) twisted wings in adults.
Mentions: Malformation and abnormalities of adults were noticed in the cantharidin treatment (Figure 3) and this progressively became more apparent as the number of sublethal selection cycles increased (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: In addition, repeated exposure of P. xylostella to sublethal concentration of cantharidin resulted in negative effects on adult performance and deformities in adults.Our results showed that sublethal concentration of cantharidin exhibited severe negative effects on population growth for longtime.These findings would be useful for assessing the potential effects and risk of cantharidin on P. xylostella and for developing effective integrated pest management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Plant Protection Resources and Pest Management of the Ministry of Education, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, Shaanxi, China. huangzy0503@163.com.

ABSTRACT
The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), is a major pest of cruciferous vegetables worldwide. Cantharidin, a natural toxin isolated from blister beetles, has been reported to be toxic to P. xylostella. However, little is known on the chronic sublethal effects of cantharidin on this species. In this study, we assessed the changes of susceptibility, development, reproduction and other demographic parameters in both the selected P. xylostella strain (Sub, selected by LC25 cantharidin for consecutive 12 generations) and the revertant strain (SubR, derived from the Sub strain without being exposed to cantharidin for 12 generations). Results revealed that the two strains maintained a relatively high-level susceptibility to cantharidin. Severe adverse effects on the population dynamics and fitness in Sub strain were observed. In addition, repeated exposure of P. xylostella to sublethal concentration of cantharidin resulted in negative effects on adult performance and deformities in adults. Although morphologically normal for individuals, the SubR strain exhibited a disadvantage in population growth rate. Our results showed that sublethal concentration of cantharidin exhibited severe negative effects on population growth for longtime. These findings would be useful for assessing the potential effects and risk of cantharidin on P. xylostella and for developing effective integrated pest management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus