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The effect of altruistic tendency on fairness in third-party punishment.

Sun L, Tan P, Cheng Y, Chen J, Qu C - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Third-party punishment, as an altruistic behavior, was found to relate to inequity aversion in previous research.It is suggested that the altruistic tendency effect influences fairness consideration in the early stage of evaluation.Moreover, the results provide further neuroscience evidence for inequity aversion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Studies of Psychological Application, School of Psychology, South China Normal University Guangzhou, China ; Primary School Affiliated to South China Normal University Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Third-party punishment, as an altruistic behavior, was found to relate to inequity aversion in previous research. Previous researchers have found that altruistic tendencies, as an individual difference, can affect resource division. Here, using the event-related potential (ERP) technique and a third-party punishment of dictator game paradigm, we explored third-party punishments in high and low altruists and recorded their EEG data. Behavioral results showed high altruists (vs. low altruists) were more likely to punish the dictators in unfair offers. ERP results revealed that patterns of medial frontal negativity (MFN) were modulated by unfairness. For high altruists, high unfair offers (90:10) elicited a larger MFN than medium unfair offers (70:30) and fair offers (50:50). By contrast, for low altruists, fair offers elicited larger MFN while high unfair offers caused the minimal MFN. It is suggested that the altruistic tendency effect influences fairness consideration in the early stage of evaluation. Moreover, the results provide further neuroscience evidence for inequity aversion.

No MeSH data available.


Event-related potential data associated with high and low altruists. (A) Grand-average ERP waveforms to different allocations for high altruists and low altruists. The shaded 290–390 ms and 400–600 ms time windows were used to measure the medial frontal negativity (MFN) and P300 magnitude, respectively. (B) The scalp distribution of the MFN and P300 difference waves on different levels of unfairness of the high altruists. (C) The scalp distribution of the MFN and P300 difference waves on different levels of unfairness of the low altruists.
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Figure 2: Event-related potential data associated with high and low altruists. (A) Grand-average ERP waveforms to different allocations for high altruists and low altruists. The shaded 290–390 ms and 400–600 ms time windows were used to measure the medial frontal negativity (MFN) and P300 magnitude, respectively. (B) The scalp distribution of the MFN and P300 difference waves on different levels of unfairness of the high altruists. (C) The scalp distribution of the MFN and P300 difference waves on different levels of unfairness of the low altruists.

Mentions: Two female participants were excluded because of displaying excessive artifacts in EEG recording. The remaining 30 participants included 15 high altruists (3 male and 12 female) and 15 low altruists (7 male and 8 female). Table 2 presents the means and SD of MFN and P300 amplitudes in three different distribution schemes. Figure 2 shows the average waveforms to different allocations for high and low altruists.


The effect of altruistic tendency on fairness in third-party punishment.

Sun L, Tan P, Cheng Y, Chen J, Qu C - Front Psychol (2015)

Event-related potential data associated with high and low altruists. (A) Grand-average ERP waveforms to different allocations for high altruists and low altruists. The shaded 290–390 ms and 400–600 ms time windows were used to measure the medial frontal negativity (MFN) and P300 magnitude, respectively. (B) The scalp distribution of the MFN and P300 difference waves on different levels of unfairness of the high altruists. (C) The scalp distribution of the MFN and P300 difference waves on different levels of unfairness of the low altruists.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488604&req=5

Figure 2: Event-related potential data associated with high and low altruists. (A) Grand-average ERP waveforms to different allocations for high altruists and low altruists. The shaded 290–390 ms and 400–600 ms time windows were used to measure the medial frontal negativity (MFN) and P300 magnitude, respectively. (B) The scalp distribution of the MFN and P300 difference waves on different levels of unfairness of the high altruists. (C) The scalp distribution of the MFN and P300 difference waves on different levels of unfairness of the low altruists.
Mentions: Two female participants were excluded because of displaying excessive artifacts in EEG recording. The remaining 30 participants included 15 high altruists (3 male and 12 female) and 15 low altruists (7 male and 8 female). Table 2 presents the means and SD of MFN and P300 amplitudes in three different distribution schemes. Figure 2 shows the average waveforms to different allocations for high and low altruists.

Bottom Line: Third-party punishment, as an altruistic behavior, was found to relate to inequity aversion in previous research.It is suggested that the altruistic tendency effect influences fairness consideration in the early stage of evaluation.Moreover, the results provide further neuroscience evidence for inequity aversion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Studies of Psychological Application, School of Psychology, South China Normal University Guangzhou, China ; Primary School Affiliated to South China Normal University Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Third-party punishment, as an altruistic behavior, was found to relate to inequity aversion in previous research. Previous researchers have found that altruistic tendencies, as an individual difference, can affect resource division. Here, using the event-related potential (ERP) technique and a third-party punishment of dictator game paradigm, we explored third-party punishments in high and low altruists and recorded their EEG data. Behavioral results showed high altruists (vs. low altruists) were more likely to punish the dictators in unfair offers. ERP results revealed that patterns of medial frontal negativity (MFN) were modulated by unfairness. For high altruists, high unfair offers (90:10) elicited a larger MFN than medium unfair offers (70:30) and fair offers (50:50). By contrast, for low altruists, fair offers elicited larger MFN while high unfair offers caused the minimal MFN. It is suggested that the altruistic tendency effect influences fairness consideration in the early stage of evaluation. Moreover, the results provide further neuroscience evidence for inequity aversion.

No MeSH data available.