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Congenital Ulnar Drift in a Surgeon.

McKee D, Eliasson S, Griswold J - Case Rep Orthop (2015)

Bottom Line: Windblown hand is a term used in many instances to describe ulnar deviations of the fingers with or without other malformations.While the most common cause of ulnar deviation of the fingers is rheumatoid arthritis, it can also be caused by other conditions such as windblown hand or Jaccoud's arthropathy.We present a case of a surgeon who has had noticeable ulnar deviation of the digits at the level of the metacarpophalangeal joint since his early 20s.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Texas Tech University, 3601 4th Street, Mail Stop 9436, Lubbock, TX 79430-9436, USA.

ABSTRACT
Windblown hand is a term used in many instances to describe ulnar deviations of the fingers with or without other malformations. In 1994 Wood reviewed all of the descriptions of cases of windblown hand and pointed out how many variants of congenital ulnar drift there are, suggesting that the many variations seen may all belong to a larger type of arthrogryposis. While the most common cause of ulnar deviation of the fingers is rheumatoid arthritis, it can also be caused by other conditions such as windblown hand or Jaccoud's arthropathy. While most hand surgeons are familiar with presentations of congenital ulnar drift, few of them are knowledgeable about Jaccoud's arthropathy as this is usually discussed within medical communities such as Rheumatology. We present a case of a surgeon who has had noticeable ulnar deviation of the digits at the level of the metacarpophalangeal joint since his early 20s. We propose that the current case is a demonstration of a type of windblown hand that has some hereditary component but is not immediately obvious at birth and presents physically more like Jaccoud's arthropathy than traditional windblown hand.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Clinical Photo of bilateral windblown hand.
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fig1: Clinical Photo of bilateral windblown hand.

Mentions: A 55-year-old Caucasian male presented with bilateral ulnar deviation of the fingers that could be corrected without pain (Figures 1 and 2). He first noticed the ulnar deviation in his early twenties. Initially he had no associated pain and he still had full function of his hands and therefore did not receive treatment. Three years prior to presentation he developed pain at the base of both thumbs and approximately 4 months priorly he began to have a significant increase in pain in his left 2nd and 3rd metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints as well as in both 1st carpometacarpal (CMC) joints. He also began to notice some wasting in the muscles between his thumb and index fingers. As an active surgeon, he noted minor difficulty with some instrumentation such as hemostat use when in the OR. Symptomology was treated with over the counter anti-inflammatory medication.


Congenital Ulnar Drift in a Surgeon.

McKee D, Eliasson S, Griswold J - Case Rep Orthop (2015)

Clinical Photo of bilateral windblown hand.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488582&req=5

fig1: Clinical Photo of bilateral windblown hand.
Mentions: A 55-year-old Caucasian male presented with bilateral ulnar deviation of the fingers that could be corrected without pain (Figures 1 and 2). He first noticed the ulnar deviation in his early twenties. Initially he had no associated pain and he still had full function of his hands and therefore did not receive treatment. Three years prior to presentation he developed pain at the base of both thumbs and approximately 4 months priorly he began to have a significant increase in pain in his left 2nd and 3rd metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints as well as in both 1st carpometacarpal (CMC) joints. He also began to notice some wasting in the muscles between his thumb and index fingers. As an active surgeon, he noted minor difficulty with some instrumentation such as hemostat use when in the OR. Symptomology was treated with over the counter anti-inflammatory medication.

Bottom Line: Windblown hand is a term used in many instances to describe ulnar deviations of the fingers with or without other malformations.While the most common cause of ulnar deviation of the fingers is rheumatoid arthritis, it can also be caused by other conditions such as windblown hand or Jaccoud's arthropathy.We present a case of a surgeon who has had noticeable ulnar deviation of the digits at the level of the metacarpophalangeal joint since his early 20s.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Texas Tech University, 3601 4th Street, Mail Stop 9436, Lubbock, TX 79430-9436, USA.

ABSTRACT
Windblown hand is a term used in many instances to describe ulnar deviations of the fingers with or without other malformations. In 1994 Wood reviewed all of the descriptions of cases of windblown hand and pointed out how many variants of congenital ulnar drift there are, suggesting that the many variations seen may all belong to a larger type of arthrogryposis. While the most common cause of ulnar deviation of the fingers is rheumatoid arthritis, it can also be caused by other conditions such as windblown hand or Jaccoud's arthropathy. While most hand surgeons are familiar with presentations of congenital ulnar drift, few of them are knowledgeable about Jaccoud's arthropathy as this is usually discussed within medical communities such as Rheumatology. We present a case of a surgeon who has had noticeable ulnar deviation of the digits at the level of the metacarpophalangeal joint since his early 20s. We propose that the current case is a demonstration of a type of windblown hand that has some hereditary component but is not immediately obvious at birth and presents physically more like Jaccoud's arthropathy than traditional windblown hand.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus