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Distractor Effect of Auditory Rhythms on Self-Paced Tapping in Chimpanzees and Humans.

Hattori Y, Tomonaga M, Matsuzawa T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Here, we report that chimpanzees and humans show a similar distractor effect in perceiving isochronous rhythms during rhythmic movement.Although this effect itself is not an advanced rhythmic ability such as dancing or singing, our results suggest that, to some extent, the biological foundation for spontaneous responses to auditory rhythms was already deeply rooted in the common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans, 6 million years ago.This also suggests the possibility of a common attentional mechanism, as proposed by the dynamic attending theory, underlying the effect of perceiving external rhythms on motor movement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University, Inuyama, Aichi, Japan; Wildlife Research Center, Kyoto University, Inuyama, Aichi, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Humans tend to spontaneously align their movements in response to visual (e.g., swinging pendulum) and auditory rhythms (e.g., hearing music while walking). Particularly in the case of the response to auditory rhythms, neuroscientific research has indicated that motor resources are also recruited while perceiving an auditory rhythm (or regular pulse), suggesting a tight link between the auditory and motor systems in the human brain. However, the evolutionary origin of spontaneous responses to auditory rhythms is unclear. Here, we report that chimpanzees and humans show a similar distractor effect in perceiving isochronous rhythms during rhythmic movement. We used isochronous auditory rhythms as distractor stimuli during self-paced alternate tapping of two keys of an electronic keyboard by humans and chimpanzees. When the tempo was similar to their spontaneous motor tempo, tapping onset was influenced by intermittent entrainment to auditory rhythms. Although this effect itself is not an advanced rhythmic ability such as dancing or singing, our results suggest that, to some extent, the biological foundation for spontaneous responses to auditory rhythms was already deeply rooted in the common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans, 6 million years ago. This also suggests the possibility of a common attentional mechanism, as proposed by the dynamic attending theory, underlying the effect of perceiving external rhythms on motor movement.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Spontaneous tapping tempo and response to each auditory stimuli.The plotted results also include the tapping results of Ai already published in Hattori, Tomonaga, and Matsuzawa (2013).
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pone.0130682.g005: Spontaneous tapping tempo and response to each auditory stimuli.The plotted results also include the tapping results of Ai already published in Hattori, Tomonaga, and Matsuzawa (2013).

Mentions: The results indicate that chimpanzees and humans can show a similar distractor effect and this effect occurs only when the stimulus tempo is close to the spontaneous motor tempo of the participants (Fig 5). Specifically, the distractor effect occurred only when the spontaneous motor and auditory stimulus tempi differed only by less than 20%. Negative mean asynchrony was absent in some cases. Our results do not agree with previous tapping studies containing instructions to synchronize to auditory rhythms, suggesting that selective attention and intention might have affected the response to external rhythms. Therefore, without selective attention and intention, even humans may not necessarily show accurate synchronization. This suggestion is supported by a recent study showing that activation in motor areas involved in pulse perception is weak when attention was not focused on auditory stimuli [29].


Distractor Effect of Auditory Rhythms on Self-Paced Tapping in Chimpanzees and Humans.

Hattori Y, Tomonaga M, Matsuzawa T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Spontaneous tapping tempo and response to each auditory stimuli.The plotted results also include the tapping results of Ai already published in Hattori, Tomonaga, and Matsuzawa (2013).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488575&req=5

pone.0130682.g005: Spontaneous tapping tempo and response to each auditory stimuli.The plotted results also include the tapping results of Ai already published in Hattori, Tomonaga, and Matsuzawa (2013).
Mentions: The results indicate that chimpanzees and humans can show a similar distractor effect and this effect occurs only when the stimulus tempo is close to the spontaneous motor tempo of the participants (Fig 5). Specifically, the distractor effect occurred only when the spontaneous motor and auditory stimulus tempi differed only by less than 20%. Negative mean asynchrony was absent in some cases. Our results do not agree with previous tapping studies containing instructions to synchronize to auditory rhythms, suggesting that selective attention and intention might have affected the response to external rhythms. Therefore, without selective attention and intention, even humans may not necessarily show accurate synchronization. This suggestion is supported by a recent study showing that activation in motor areas involved in pulse perception is weak when attention was not focused on auditory stimuli [29].

Bottom Line: Here, we report that chimpanzees and humans show a similar distractor effect in perceiving isochronous rhythms during rhythmic movement.Although this effect itself is not an advanced rhythmic ability such as dancing or singing, our results suggest that, to some extent, the biological foundation for spontaneous responses to auditory rhythms was already deeply rooted in the common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans, 6 million years ago.This also suggests the possibility of a common attentional mechanism, as proposed by the dynamic attending theory, underlying the effect of perceiving external rhythms on motor movement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University, Inuyama, Aichi, Japan; Wildlife Research Center, Kyoto University, Inuyama, Aichi, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Humans tend to spontaneously align their movements in response to visual (e.g., swinging pendulum) and auditory rhythms (e.g., hearing music while walking). Particularly in the case of the response to auditory rhythms, neuroscientific research has indicated that motor resources are also recruited while perceiving an auditory rhythm (or regular pulse), suggesting a tight link between the auditory and motor systems in the human brain. However, the evolutionary origin of spontaneous responses to auditory rhythms is unclear. Here, we report that chimpanzees and humans show a similar distractor effect in perceiving isochronous rhythms during rhythmic movement. We used isochronous auditory rhythms as distractor stimuli during self-paced alternate tapping of two keys of an electronic keyboard by humans and chimpanzees. When the tempo was similar to their spontaneous motor tempo, tapping onset was influenced by intermittent entrainment to auditory rhythms. Although this effect itself is not an advanced rhythmic ability such as dancing or singing, our results suggest that, to some extent, the biological foundation for spontaneous responses to auditory rhythms was already deeply rooted in the common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans, 6 million years ago. This also suggests the possibility of a common attentional mechanism, as proposed by the dynamic attending theory, underlying the effect of perceiving external rhythms on motor movement.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus