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Re-discovering ancient wheat varieties as functional foods.

Cooper R - J Tradit Complement Med (2015)

Bottom Line: With the gluten-free food market worth almost $1.6 bn in 2011, there is every reason for renewed interest in ancient grains.This resurgent interest is expressed in re-discovering ancient varieties as functional foods.In particular, people affected by celiac disease have to avoid all gluten in their diet and several ancient grains may offer an important alternative.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT
With the gluten-free food market worth almost $1.6 bn in 2011, there is every reason for renewed interest in ancient grains. This resurgent interest is expressed in re-discovering ancient varieties as functional foods. In particular, people affected by celiac disease have to avoid all gluten in their diet and several ancient grains may offer an important alternative.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Major flavonoids in Triticum and Aegilops species.
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fig3: Major flavonoids in Triticum and Aegilops species.

Mentions: Cultivation and repeated harvesting and sowing of the grains of wild grasses led to the creation of domestic strains. Domesticated wheat has larger grains and the seeds (spikelets) remain attached to the ear by a toughened rachis during harvesting. In the case of wild strains, a more fragile rachis allows the ear to easily shatter and disperse the spikelets. As the traits that improve wheat as a food source also involve the loss of the plant's natural seed dispersal mechanisms, highly domesticated strains of wheat cannot survive in the wild. A detailed re-evaluation of varieties of the wheat complex, particularly Triticum and Aegilops species was undertaken.5 In 1994, Cooper et al,6 screened species of wild wheats and barleys (Fig. 2) for the presence of their major flavonoid constituents. (Fig. 3) and germination inhibitors (Fig. 4). Two lignans were found as naturally occurring germination inhibitors of Aegilops species. The, lignan named MEL I shown in Fig. 4 was synthesized7 using a biogenetic approach from well known precursors to lignans, the phenylpropanoids (ferulic acid and its reduced alcohol) as shown in Fig. 5.


Re-discovering ancient wheat varieties as functional foods.

Cooper R - J Tradit Complement Med (2015)

Major flavonoids in Triticum and Aegilops species.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488568&req=5

fig3: Major flavonoids in Triticum and Aegilops species.
Mentions: Cultivation and repeated harvesting and sowing of the grains of wild grasses led to the creation of domestic strains. Domesticated wheat has larger grains and the seeds (spikelets) remain attached to the ear by a toughened rachis during harvesting. In the case of wild strains, a more fragile rachis allows the ear to easily shatter and disperse the spikelets. As the traits that improve wheat as a food source also involve the loss of the plant's natural seed dispersal mechanisms, highly domesticated strains of wheat cannot survive in the wild. A detailed re-evaluation of varieties of the wheat complex, particularly Triticum and Aegilops species was undertaken.5 In 1994, Cooper et al,6 screened species of wild wheats and barleys (Fig. 2) for the presence of their major flavonoid constituents. (Fig. 3) and germination inhibitors (Fig. 4). Two lignans were found as naturally occurring germination inhibitors of Aegilops species. The, lignan named MEL I shown in Fig. 4 was synthesized7 using a biogenetic approach from well known precursors to lignans, the phenylpropanoids (ferulic acid and its reduced alcohol) as shown in Fig. 5.

Bottom Line: With the gluten-free food market worth almost $1.6 bn in 2011, there is every reason for renewed interest in ancient grains.This resurgent interest is expressed in re-discovering ancient varieties as functional foods.In particular, people affected by celiac disease have to avoid all gluten in their diet and several ancient grains may offer an important alternative.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT
With the gluten-free food market worth almost $1.6 bn in 2011, there is every reason for renewed interest in ancient grains. This resurgent interest is expressed in re-discovering ancient varieties as functional foods. In particular, people affected by celiac disease have to avoid all gluten in their diet and several ancient grains may offer an important alternative.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus