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Disruption of Memory Reconsolidation Erases a Fear Memory Trace in the Human Amygdala: An 18-Month Follow-Up.

Björkstrand J, Agren T, Frick A, Engman J, Larsson EM, Furmark T, Fredrikson M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Fear memories can be attenuated by reactivation followed by disrupted reconsolidation.In this follow-up study we demonstrate that the behavioral effect persists over 18 months reflected in superior reacquisition after undisrupted, as compared to disrupted reconsolidation, and that neural activity in the basolateral amygdala representing the initial fear memory predicts return of fear.We conclude that disrupting reconsolidation have long lasting behavioral effects and may permanently erase the fear component of an amygdala-dependent memory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Fear memories can be attenuated by reactivation followed by disrupted reconsolidation. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we recently showed that reactivation and reconsolidation of a conditioned fear memory trace in the basolateral amygdala predicts subsequent fear expression over two days, while reactivation followed by disrupted reconsolidation abolishes the memory trace and suppresses fear. In this follow-up study we demonstrate that the behavioral effect persists over 18 months reflected in superior reacquisition after undisrupted, as compared to disrupted reconsolidation, and that neural activity in the basolateral amygdala representing the initial fear memory predicts return of fear. We conclude that disrupting reconsolidation have long lasting behavioral effects and may permanently erase the fear component of an amygdala-dependent memory.

No MeSH data available.


Areas predicting long-term return of fear overlap both with the original fear memory trace and with areas predicting short-term return of fear.Areas in the amygdala in the 6h group representing the original fear memory trace and that overlapped with areas predicting short-term return of fear in turn overlapped with areas predicting long-term return of fear. The right side of the brain is depicted to the right.
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pone.0129393.g002: Areas predicting long-term return of fear overlap both with the original fear memory trace and with areas predicting short-term return of fear.Areas in the amygdala in the 6h group representing the original fear memory trace and that overlapped with areas predicting short-term return of fear in turn overlapped with areas predicting long-term return of fear. The right side of the brain is depicted to the right.

Mentions: Following the same analytic strategy as Agren et al. [16] we next evaluated if initial amygdala activity during short-term renewal, representing the original fear memory trace, predicted long-term fear expression by correlating BOLD activity in the amygdala with return of fear after 18 months. In the 6h group, bilateral amygdala activity predicted return of fear – see Fig 1A upper brain slice (xyz = 30, -4, -20; Z = 3.46; P<0.001; 1620mm3; xyz = -30, -1, -17; Z = 3.81; P<0.001; 1539mm3), while in the 10min group no correlations between brain activity and electrophysiological fear measures emerged – see Fig 1A lower brain slice. The effects were significant bilaterally also when corrected for multiple comparisons (xyz = 30, -4, -20; Z = 3.46; PFWE = 0.029; 54 mm3; xyz = -30, -1, -17; Z = 3.81; PFWE = 0.010; 81 mm3). The correlation in the 6h group was significantly stronger than in the 10min group bilaterally in the amygdala (xyz = 24, 2, -14; Z = 3.46; P<0.001; 972mm3; xyz = -24, -4, -20; Z = 2.53; P = 0.006; 1242mm3). See the brain slice in Fig 1B. The effect survived correction for multiple comparisons in the right amygdala (xyz = 24, 2, -14; Z = 3.46; PFWE = 0.022; 81 mm3). To evaluate if these findings were spatially similar to previous results we analyzed if fear predicting areas after 18 months were co-localized with the areas representing the original fear memory trace as well as areas predicting short-term return of fear. Results revealed that areas in the amygdala that predicted return of fear over 18 months in the 6h group were co-localized both with areas in the amygdala reflecting the original memory trace and areas predicting short term return of fear over 5 days (xyz = -24, -4, -20; Z = 3.78; p<0.001; 378mm3; xyz = 27, -1, -23; Z = 3.12; p = 0.001; 675mm3)—see Fig 2.


Disruption of Memory Reconsolidation Erases a Fear Memory Trace in the Human Amygdala: An 18-Month Follow-Up.

Björkstrand J, Agren T, Frick A, Engman J, Larsson EM, Furmark T, Fredrikson M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Areas predicting long-term return of fear overlap both with the original fear memory trace and with areas predicting short-term return of fear.Areas in the amygdala in the 6h group representing the original fear memory trace and that overlapped with areas predicting short-term return of fear in turn overlapped with areas predicting long-term return of fear. The right side of the brain is depicted to the right.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488556&req=5

pone.0129393.g002: Areas predicting long-term return of fear overlap both with the original fear memory trace and with areas predicting short-term return of fear.Areas in the amygdala in the 6h group representing the original fear memory trace and that overlapped with areas predicting short-term return of fear in turn overlapped with areas predicting long-term return of fear. The right side of the brain is depicted to the right.
Mentions: Following the same analytic strategy as Agren et al. [16] we next evaluated if initial amygdala activity during short-term renewal, representing the original fear memory trace, predicted long-term fear expression by correlating BOLD activity in the amygdala with return of fear after 18 months. In the 6h group, bilateral amygdala activity predicted return of fear – see Fig 1A upper brain slice (xyz = 30, -4, -20; Z = 3.46; P<0.001; 1620mm3; xyz = -30, -1, -17; Z = 3.81; P<0.001; 1539mm3), while in the 10min group no correlations between brain activity and electrophysiological fear measures emerged – see Fig 1A lower brain slice. The effects were significant bilaterally also when corrected for multiple comparisons (xyz = 30, -4, -20; Z = 3.46; PFWE = 0.029; 54 mm3; xyz = -30, -1, -17; Z = 3.81; PFWE = 0.010; 81 mm3). The correlation in the 6h group was significantly stronger than in the 10min group bilaterally in the amygdala (xyz = 24, 2, -14; Z = 3.46; P<0.001; 972mm3; xyz = -24, -4, -20; Z = 2.53; P = 0.006; 1242mm3). See the brain slice in Fig 1B. The effect survived correction for multiple comparisons in the right amygdala (xyz = 24, 2, -14; Z = 3.46; PFWE = 0.022; 81 mm3). To evaluate if these findings were spatially similar to previous results we analyzed if fear predicting areas after 18 months were co-localized with the areas representing the original fear memory trace as well as areas predicting short-term return of fear. Results revealed that areas in the amygdala that predicted return of fear over 18 months in the 6h group were co-localized both with areas in the amygdala reflecting the original memory trace and areas predicting short term return of fear over 5 days (xyz = -24, -4, -20; Z = 3.78; p<0.001; 378mm3; xyz = 27, -1, -23; Z = 3.12; p = 0.001; 675mm3)—see Fig 2.

Bottom Line: Fear memories can be attenuated by reactivation followed by disrupted reconsolidation.In this follow-up study we demonstrate that the behavioral effect persists over 18 months reflected in superior reacquisition after undisrupted, as compared to disrupted reconsolidation, and that neural activity in the basolateral amygdala representing the initial fear memory predicts return of fear.We conclude that disrupting reconsolidation have long lasting behavioral effects and may permanently erase the fear component of an amygdala-dependent memory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Fear memories can be attenuated by reactivation followed by disrupted reconsolidation. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we recently showed that reactivation and reconsolidation of a conditioned fear memory trace in the basolateral amygdala predicts subsequent fear expression over two days, while reactivation followed by disrupted reconsolidation abolishes the memory trace and suppresses fear. In this follow-up study we demonstrate that the behavioral effect persists over 18 months reflected in superior reacquisition after undisrupted, as compared to disrupted reconsolidation, and that neural activity in the basolateral amygdala representing the initial fear memory predicts return of fear. We conclude that disrupting reconsolidation have long lasting behavioral effects and may permanently erase the fear component of an amygdala-dependent memory.

No MeSH data available.