Limits...
Isolated Upper Extremity Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Child.

Halula SE, Leino DG, Patel MN, Racadio JM, Lungren MP - Case Rep Radiol (2015)

Bottom Line: The most common presentation is intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy or single or multiple intraparenchymal masses involving the liver, spleen, or kidneys.Here we describe the imaging and pathology findings of an unusual case of PTLD appearing as an intramuscular forearm lesion in a pediatric male.The manifestation of PTLD as an isolated upper extremity mass in a pediatric patient has to our knowledge not been described.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pediatric Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3030, USA.

ABSTRACT
Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a well-described complication of solid organ and bone marrow transplants. The most common presentation is intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy or single or multiple intraparenchymal masses involving the liver, spleen, or kidneys. Here we describe the imaging and pathology findings of an unusual case of PTLD appearing as an intramuscular forearm lesion in a pediatric male. The manifestation of PTLD as an isolated upper extremity mass in a pediatric patient has to our knowledge not been described.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Fat-saturated T2 weighted axial image of the right forearm mass demonstrates a hyperintense lesion within the anterior compartment with edema within the adjacent subcutaneous fat and muscle. (b) Contrast enhanced fat-saturated T1 weighted images of the same level demonstrate irregular peripheral enhancement of the lesion.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488545&req=5

fig2: (a) Fat-saturated T2 weighted axial image of the right forearm mass demonstrates a hyperintense lesion within the anterior compartment with edema within the adjacent subcutaneous fat and muscle. (b) Contrast enhanced fat-saturated T1 weighted images of the same level demonstrate irregular peripheral enhancement of the lesion.

Mentions: Initial ultrasound of the palpable abnormal area demonstrated an ill-defined heterogeneous deep soft tissue mass in the anterior forearm musculature (Figure 1). No significant internal vascularity by Color Doppler was observed. The ultrasound was concerning for an inflammatory process or subacute hematoma. An MRI was performed which demonstrated a 7.2 × 4.1 × 2.9 cm (CC × TR × AP) heterogeneous lesion—predominantly iso- to hypointense T1 and mildly hyperintense T2—in the anterior soft tissue of the right forearm (Figure 2). The lesion demonstrated peripheral rim enhancement. Adjacent edema within the subcutaneous fat and muscles was present, along with fluid signal along the superficial fascial planes of the forearm musculature. Subsequently, a whole body FDG PET-CT revealed a large focus of peripheral increased FDG uptake along the ventral aspect of the proximal forearm extending into the antecubital fossa (Figure 3). The differential diagnosis included myositis ossificans, infection, and hematoma with secondary infection. PTLD was not initially raised due to the location and size of the mass.


Isolated Upper Extremity Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Child.

Halula SE, Leino DG, Patel MN, Racadio JM, Lungren MP - Case Rep Radiol (2015)

(a) Fat-saturated T2 weighted axial image of the right forearm mass demonstrates a hyperintense lesion within the anterior compartment with edema within the adjacent subcutaneous fat and muscle. (b) Contrast enhanced fat-saturated T1 weighted images of the same level demonstrate irregular peripheral enhancement of the lesion.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488545&req=5

fig2: (a) Fat-saturated T2 weighted axial image of the right forearm mass demonstrates a hyperintense lesion within the anterior compartment with edema within the adjacent subcutaneous fat and muscle. (b) Contrast enhanced fat-saturated T1 weighted images of the same level demonstrate irregular peripheral enhancement of the lesion.
Mentions: Initial ultrasound of the palpable abnormal area demonstrated an ill-defined heterogeneous deep soft tissue mass in the anterior forearm musculature (Figure 1). No significant internal vascularity by Color Doppler was observed. The ultrasound was concerning for an inflammatory process or subacute hematoma. An MRI was performed which demonstrated a 7.2 × 4.1 × 2.9 cm (CC × TR × AP) heterogeneous lesion—predominantly iso- to hypointense T1 and mildly hyperintense T2—in the anterior soft tissue of the right forearm (Figure 2). The lesion demonstrated peripheral rim enhancement. Adjacent edema within the subcutaneous fat and muscles was present, along with fluid signal along the superficial fascial planes of the forearm musculature. Subsequently, a whole body FDG PET-CT revealed a large focus of peripheral increased FDG uptake along the ventral aspect of the proximal forearm extending into the antecubital fossa (Figure 3). The differential diagnosis included myositis ossificans, infection, and hematoma with secondary infection. PTLD was not initially raised due to the location and size of the mass.

Bottom Line: The most common presentation is intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy or single or multiple intraparenchymal masses involving the liver, spleen, or kidneys.Here we describe the imaging and pathology findings of an unusual case of PTLD appearing as an intramuscular forearm lesion in a pediatric male.The manifestation of PTLD as an isolated upper extremity mass in a pediatric patient has to our knowledge not been described.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pediatric Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3030, USA.

ABSTRACT
Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a well-described complication of solid organ and bone marrow transplants. The most common presentation is intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy or single or multiple intraparenchymal masses involving the liver, spleen, or kidneys. Here we describe the imaging and pathology findings of an unusual case of PTLD appearing as an intramuscular forearm lesion in a pediatric male. The manifestation of PTLD as an isolated upper extremity mass in a pediatric patient has to our knowledge not been described.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus