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Successive Generations in a Rat Model Respond Differently to a Constant Obesogenic Environment.

Tait AH, Raubenheimer D, Green MP, Cupido CL, Gluckman PD, Vickers MH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that second and third generation offspring had a reduced body fat to lean mass ratio and a reduced appetite relative to first generation offspring, irrespective of dietary macronutrient balance.The trajectory of this response is suggestive of a reduction in chronic disease risk across generations.This is one of the first studies, to our knowledge, to investigate the transgenerational response following parental transition to a persistent obesogenic environment, and to demonstrate that successive generations respond differently to this constant environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Liggins Institute and Gravida: National Centre for Growth and Development, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University, Albany, Auckland, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
Research has shown that if a mother experiences a transitory perturbation to her environment during pregnancy or lactation, there are transgenerational consequences often involving a disordered metabolic phenotype in first generation offspring with recovery across subsequent generations. In contrast, little is known about the nature of the transgenerational response of offspring when a mother experiences a perturbation that is not transitory but instead persists across generations. Our study, using a rat model, subjected the parental generation to a change in environment and concomitant shift from a grain-based to obesogenic diets to generate an adipose phenotype in first generation offspring emulating a common scenario in human urbanisation and migration. We then investigated whether the obese phenotype was stable across generations when maintained in the transitioned environment, and whether dietary macronutrient balance affected the response. We found that second and third generation offspring had a reduced body fat to lean mass ratio and a reduced appetite relative to first generation offspring, irrespective of dietary macronutrient balance. The trajectory of this response is suggestive of a reduction in chronic disease risk across generations. This is one of the first studies, to our knowledge, to investigate the transgenerational response following parental transition to a persistent obesogenic environment, and to demonstrate that successive generations respond differently to this constant environment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a-f) Body composition, (g-h) calorie intake and (i-l) nutrient conversion efficiencies.Circles represent R, squares represent HF and triangles represent LP, where body composition and nutrient intake values are means ± SEM, and nutrient conversion efficiency values are estimated marginal means ± SEM. *effect of generation, #effect of dietary group. Results of the corresponding statistical analyses are shown in Table 2.
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pone.0129779.g003: (a-f) Body composition, (g-h) calorie intake and (i-l) nutrient conversion efficiencies.Circles represent R, squares represent HF and triangles represent LP, where body composition and nutrient intake values are means ± SEM, and nutrient conversion efficiency values are estimated marginal means ± SEM. *effect of generation, #effect of dietary group. Results of the corresponding statistical analyses are shown in Table 2.

Mentions: Fat mass, lean mass and the ratio of fat to lean mass all changed across generations both for males and females (Table 2, Fig 3A–3F). For both sexes, fat mass in F3 was reduced relative to F1, and lean mass was greater in F2 and F3 relative to F1. In males, lean mass was also greater in F3 relative to F2. In both sexes, the ratio of fat to lean mass was reduced in F2 and F3 relative to F1. Macronutrient balance did not affect the trajectory of change across generations in any of our three measures of body composition for either sex, but had an effect within generation on fat mass and the ratio of fat to lean mass for both sexes and on lean mass for males. Fat mass and the ratio of fat to lean mass were greater in HF than R for both sexes, and in males only the ratio of fat to lean mass was greater in LP than R and lean mass was reduced in HF and LP compared to R.


Successive Generations in a Rat Model Respond Differently to a Constant Obesogenic Environment.

Tait AH, Raubenheimer D, Green MP, Cupido CL, Gluckman PD, Vickers MH - PLoS ONE (2015)

(a-f) Body composition, (g-h) calorie intake and (i-l) nutrient conversion efficiencies.Circles represent R, squares represent HF and triangles represent LP, where body composition and nutrient intake values are means ± SEM, and nutrient conversion efficiency values are estimated marginal means ± SEM. *effect of generation, #effect of dietary group. Results of the corresponding statistical analyses are shown in Table 2.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488537&req=5

pone.0129779.g003: (a-f) Body composition, (g-h) calorie intake and (i-l) nutrient conversion efficiencies.Circles represent R, squares represent HF and triangles represent LP, where body composition and nutrient intake values are means ± SEM, and nutrient conversion efficiency values are estimated marginal means ± SEM. *effect of generation, #effect of dietary group. Results of the corresponding statistical analyses are shown in Table 2.
Mentions: Fat mass, lean mass and the ratio of fat to lean mass all changed across generations both for males and females (Table 2, Fig 3A–3F). For both sexes, fat mass in F3 was reduced relative to F1, and lean mass was greater in F2 and F3 relative to F1. In males, lean mass was also greater in F3 relative to F2. In both sexes, the ratio of fat to lean mass was reduced in F2 and F3 relative to F1. Macronutrient balance did not affect the trajectory of change across generations in any of our three measures of body composition for either sex, but had an effect within generation on fat mass and the ratio of fat to lean mass for both sexes and on lean mass for males. Fat mass and the ratio of fat to lean mass were greater in HF than R for both sexes, and in males only the ratio of fat to lean mass was greater in LP than R and lean mass was reduced in HF and LP compared to R.

Bottom Line: We found that second and third generation offspring had a reduced body fat to lean mass ratio and a reduced appetite relative to first generation offspring, irrespective of dietary macronutrient balance.The trajectory of this response is suggestive of a reduction in chronic disease risk across generations.This is one of the first studies, to our knowledge, to investigate the transgenerational response following parental transition to a persistent obesogenic environment, and to demonstrate that successive generations respond differently to this constant environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Liggins Institute and Gravida: National Centre for Growth and Development, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University, Albany, Auckland, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
Research has shown that if a mother experiences a transitory perturbation to her environment during pregnancy or lactation, there are transgenerational consequences often involving a disordered metabolic phenotype in first generation offspring with recovery across subsequent generations. In contrast, little is known about the nature of the transgenerational response of offspring when a mother experiences a perturbation that is not transitory but instead persists across generations. Our study, using a rat model, subjected the parental generation to a change in environment and concomitant shift from a grain-based to obesogenic diets to generate an adipose phenotype in first generation offspring emulating a common scenario in human urbanisation and migration. We then investigated whether the obese phenotype was stable across generations when maintained in the transitioned environment, and whether dietary macronutrient balance affected the response. We found that second and third generation offspring had a reduced body fat to lean mass ratio and a reduced appetite relative to first generation offspring, irrespective of dietary macronutrient balance. The trajectory of this response is suggestive of a reduction in chronic disease risk across generations. This is one of the first studies, to our knowledge, to investigate the transgenerational response following parental transition to a persistent obesogenic environment, and to demonstrate that successive generations respond differently to this constant environment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus