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Root-inhabiting fungi in alien plant species in relation to invasion status and soil chemical properties.

Majewska ML, Błaszkowski J, Nobis M, Rola K, Nobis A, Łakomiec D, Czachura P, Zubek S - Symbiosis (2015)

Bottom Line: The mycelia of dark septate endophytes (DSE) were observed in 32 of the species, while sporangia of Olpidium spp. were found in the roots of 10.Claroideoglomus claroideum, Funneliformis mosseae and Septoglomus constrictum were found the most frequently.No relationships were also found between the presence of AMF, DSE and Olpidium spp.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Botany, Jagiellonian University, Kopernika 27, 31-501 Kraków, Poland.

ABSTRACT

In order to recognize interactions between alien vascular plants and soil microorganisms and thus better understand the mechanisms of plant invasions, we examined the mycorrhizal status, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization rate, arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) morphology and presence of fungal root endophytes in 37 non-native species in Central Europe. We also studied the AMF diversity and chemical properties of soils from under these species. The plant and soil materials were collected in southern Poland. We found that 35 of the species formed AM and their mycorrhizal status depended on species identity. Thirty-three taxa had AM of Arum-type alone. Lycopersicon esculentum showed intermediate AM morphology and Eragrostis albensis developed both Arum and Paris. The mycelia of dark septate endophytes (DSE) were observed in 32 of the species, while sporangia of Olpidium spp. were found in the roots of 10. Thirteen common and worldwide occurring AMF species as well as three unidentified spore morphotypes were isolated from trap cultures established with the soils from under the plant species. Claroideoglomus claroideum, Funneliformis mosseae and Septoglomus constrictum were found the most frequently. The presence of root-inhabiting fungi and the intensity of their colonization were not correlated with soil chemical properties, plant invasion status, their local abundance and habitat type. No relationships were also found between the presence of AMF, DSE and Olpidium spp. These suggest that other edaphic conditions, plant and fungal species identity or the abundance of these fungi in soils might have an impact on the occurrence and intensity of fungal root colonization in the plants under study.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Principal component analysis (PCA) ordination diagram (two first axes) of studied plant species and associated arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), dark septate endophytes (DSE) and Olpidium spp. colonization parameters. Mycorrhizal frequency (FAMF), relative mycorrhizal root length (M), the frequency of occurrence of AMF vesicles (FVES), the frequency of occurrence of dark septate endophytes (FDSE), the frequency of Olpidium occurrence (FOLP). AMF species richness (AMFsp.rich). The size of the circles indicates the invasion status of plant species (small – weed, medium – not harmful, large – transformer). Particular colors of the circles correspond to different plant life forms. The abbreviation of species names are explained in Table 1
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Fig3: Principal component analysis (PCA) ordination diagram (two first axes) of studied plant species and associated arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), dark septate endophytes (DSE) and Olpidium spp. colonization parameters. Mycorrhizal frequency (FAMF), relative mycorrhizal root length (M), the frequency of occurrence of AMF vesicles (FVES), the frequency of occurrence of dark septate endophytes (FDSE), the frequency of Olpidium occurrence (FOLP). AMF species richness (AMFsp.rich). The size of the circles indicates the invasion status of plant species (small – weed, medium – not harmful, large – transformer). Particular colors of the circles correspond to different plant life forms. The abbreviation of species names are explained in Table 1

Mentions: bAbbreviations of plant species names used in Fig. 3


Root-inhabiting fungi in alien plant species in relation to invasion status and soil chemical properties.

Majewska ML, Błaszkowski J, Nobis M, Rola K, Nobis A, Łakomiec D, Czachura P, Zubek S - Symbiosis (2015)

Principal component analysis (PCA) ordination diagram (two first axes) of studied plant species and associated arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), dark septate endophytes (DSE) and Olpidium spp. colonization parameters. Mycorrhizal frequency (FAMF), relative mycorrhizal root length (M), the frequency of occurrence of AMF vesicles (FVES), the frequency of occurrence of dark septate endophytes (FDSE), the frequency of Olpidium occurrence (FOLP). AMF species richness (AMFsp.rich). The size of the circles indicates the invasion status of plant species (small – weed, medium – not harmful, large – transformer). Particular colors of the circles correspond to different plant life forms. The abbreviation of species names are explained in Table 1
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488508&req=5

Fig3: Principal component analysis (PCA) ordination diagram (two first axes) of studied plant species and associated arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), dark septate endophytes (DSE) and Olpidium spp. colonization parameters. Mycorrhizal frequency (FAMF), relative mycorrhizal root length (M), the frequency of occurrence of AMF vesicles (FVES), the frequency of occurrence of dark septate endophytes (FDSE), the frequency of Olpidium occurrence (FOLP). AMF species richness (AMFsp.rich). The size of the circles indicates the invasion status of plant species (small – weed, medium – not harmful, large – transformer). Particular colors of the circles correspond to different plant life forms. The abbreviation of species names are explained in Table 1
Mentions: bAbbreviations of plant species names used in Fig. 3

Bottom Line: The mycelia of dark septate endophytes (DSE) were observed in 32 of the species, while sporangia of Olpidium spp. were found in the roots of 10.Claroideoglomus claroideum, Funneliformis mosseae and Septoglomus constrictum were found the most frequently.No relationships were also found between the presence of AMF, DSE and Olpidium spp.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Botany, Jagiellonian University, Kopernika 27, 31-501 Kraków, Poland.

ABSTRACT

In order to recognize interactions between alien vascular plants and soil microorganisms and thus better understand the mechanisms of plant invasions, we examined the mycorrhizal status, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization rate, arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) morphology and presence of fungal root endophytes in 37 non-native species in Central Europe. We also studied the AMF diversity and chemical properties of soils from under these species. The plant and soil materials were collected in southern Poland. We found that 35 of the species formed AM and their mycorrhizal status depended on species identity. Thirty-three taxa had AM of Arum-type alone. Lycopersicon esculentum showed intermediate AM morphology and Eragrostis albensis developed both Arum and Paris. The mycelia of dark septate endophytes (DSE) were observed in 32 of the species, while sporangia of Olpidium spp. were found in the roots of 10. Thirteen common and worldwide occurring AMF species as well as three unidentified spore morphotypes were isolated from trap cultures established with the soils from under the plant species. Claroideoglomus claroideum, Funneliformis mosseae and Septoglomus constrictum were found the most frequently. The presence of root-inhabiting fungi and the intensity of their colonization were not correlated with soil chemical properties, plant invasion status, their local abundance and habitat type. No relationships were also found between the presence of AMF, DSE and Olpidium spp. These suggest that other edaphic conditions, plant and fungal species identity or the abundance of these fungi in soils might have an impact on the occurrence and intensity of fungal root colonization in the plants under study.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus