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Messaging to Increase Public Support for Naloxone Distribution Policies in the United States: Results from a Randomized Survey Experiment.

Bachhuber MA, McGinty EE, Kennedy-Hendricks A, Niederdeppe J, Barry CL - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: For each policy item, logistic regression models were used to test the effect of each message exposure compared with the no-exposure control group.All messages increased public support, but combining factual information and the sympathetic narrative was most effective.Public support for naloxone distribution can be improved through education and sympathetic portrayals of the population who stands to benefit from these policies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America; Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America; Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Barriers to public support for naloxone distribution include lack of knowledge, concerns about potential unintended consequences, and lack of sympathy for people at risk of overdose.

Methods: A randomized survey experiment was conducted with a nationally-representative web-based survey research panel (GfK KnowledgePanel). Participants were randomly assigned to read different messages alone or in combination: 1) factual information about naloxone; 2) pre-emptive refutation of potential concerns about naloxone distribution; and 3) a sympathetic narrative about a mother whose daughter died of an opioid overdose. Participants were then asked if they support or oppose policies related to naloxone distribution. For each policy item, logistic regression models were used to test the effect of each message exposure compared with the no-exposure control group.

Results: The final sample consisted of 1,598 participants (completion rate: 72.6%). Factual information and the sympathetic narrative alone each led to higher support for training first responders to use naloxone, providing naloxone to friends and family members of people using opioids, and passing laws to protect people who administer naloxone. Participants receiving the combination of the sympathetic narrative and factual information, compared to factual information alone, were more likely to support all policies: providing naloxone to friends and family members (OR: 2.0 [95% CI: 1.4 to 2.9]), training first responders to use naloxone (OR: 2.0 [95% CI: 1.2 to 3.4]), passing laws to protect people if they administer naloxone (OR: 1.5 [95% CI: 1.04 to 2.2]), and passing laws to protect people if they call for medical help for an overdose (OR: 1.7 [95% CI: 1.2 to 2.5]).

Conclusions: All messages increased public support, but combining factual information and the sympathetic narrative was most effective. Public support for naloxone distribution can be improved through education and sympathetic portrayals of the population who stands to benefit from these policies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of factual information, a sympathetic narrative, or both on beliefs about naloxone distribution.
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pone.0130050.g002: Effects of factual information, a sympathetic narrative, or both on beliefs about naloxone distribution.

Mentions: In almost all cases, participants exposed to messages about naloxone had significantly different reported beliefs than those in the no-exposure control group (Table 4, Fig 2 and S2 Fig). Factual information alone led to more participants believing that providing naloxone to first responders would save lives (73.7% versus 60.0% in the no-exposure control group) and providing naloxone to friends and family members of people who use opioids would save lives (55.8% versus 35.9% in the no-exposure control group). Similarly, the sympathetic narrative alone led to more participants believing that providing naloxone to first responders (77.0% versus 60.0% in the no-exposure control group) and providing naloxone to friends and family members of people who use opioids (58.8% versus 35.9% in the no-exposure control group) would save lives. Participants in all message groups including factual information (i.e., alone or in combination with refutation and the sympathetic narrative) were less likely to believe that naloxone should only be given by medical professionals compared with participants in the no-exposure control group. Results from the sensitivity analysis using a belief scale were similar (S2 Appendix).


Messaging to Increase Public Support for Naloxone Distribution Policies in the United States: Results from a Randomized Survey Experiment.

Bachhuber MA, McGinty EE, Kennedy-Hendricks A, Niederdeppe J, Barry CL - PLoS ONE (2015)

Effects of factual information, a sympathetic narrative, or both on beliefs about naloxone distribution.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488484&req=5

pone.0130050.g002: Effects of factual information, a sympathetic narrative, or both on beliefs about naloxone distribution.
Mentions: In almost all cases, participants exposed to messages about naloxone had significantly different reported beliefs than those in the no-exposure control group (Table 4, Fig 2 and S2 Fig). Factual information alone led to more participants believing that providing naloxone to first responders would save lives (73.7% versus 60.0% in the no-exposure control group) and providing naloxone to friends and family members of people who use opioids would save lives (55.8% versus 35.9% in the no-exposure control group). Similarly, the sympathetic narrative alone led to more participants believing that providing naloxone to first responders (77.0% versus 60.0% in the no-exposure control group) and providing naloxone to friends and family members of people who use opioids (58.8% versus 35.9% in the no-exposure control group) would save lives. Participants in all message groups including factual information (i.e., alone or in combination with refutation and the sympathetic narrative) were less likely to believe that naloxone should only be given by medical professionals compared with participants in the no-exposure control group. Results from the sensitivity analysis using a belief scale were similar (S2 Appendix).

Bottom Line: For each policy item, logistic regression models were used to test the effect of each message exposure compared with the no-exposure control group.All messages increased public support, but combining factual information and the sympathetic narrative was most effective.Public support for naloxone distribution can be improved through education and sympathetic portrayals of the population who stands to benefit from these policies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America; Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America; Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Barriers to public support for naloxone distribution include lack of knowledge, concerns about potential unintended consequences, and lack of sympathy for people at risk of overdose.

Methods: A randomized survey experiment was conducted with a nationally-representative web-based survey research panel (GfK KnowledgePanel). Participants were randomly assigned to read different messages alone or in combination: 1) factual information about naloxone; 2) pre-emptive refutation of potential concerns about naloxone distribution; and 3) a sympathetic narrative about a mother whose daughter died of an opioid overdose. Participants were then asked if they support or oppose policies related to naloxone distribution. For each policy item, logistic regression models were used to test the effect of each message exposure compared with the no-exposure control group.

Results: The final sample consisted of 1,598 participants (completion rate: 72.6%). Factual information and the sympathetic narrative alone each led to higher support for training first responders to use naloxone, providing naloxone to friends and family members of people using opioids, and passing laws to protect people who administer naloxone. Participants receiving the combination of the sympathetic narrative and factual information, compared to factual information alone, were more likely to support all policies: providing naloxone to friends and family members (OR: 2.0 [95% CI: 1.4 to 2.9]), training first responders to use naloxone (OR: 2.0 [95% CI: 1.2 to 3.4]), passing laws to protect people if they administer naloxone (OR: 1.5 [95% CI: 1.04 to 2.2]), and passing laws to protect people if they call for medical help for an overdose (OR: 1.7 [95% CI: 1.2 to 2.5]).

Conclusions: All messages increased public support, but combining factual information and the sympathetic narrative was most effective. Public support for naloxone distribution can be improved through education and sympathetic portrayals of the population who stands to benefit from these policies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus