Limits...
Cold Atmospheric Plasma Treatment Induces Anti-Proliferative Effects in Prostate Cancer Cells by Redox and Apoptotic Signaling Pathways.

Weiss M, Gümbel D, Hanschmann EM, Mandelkow R, Gelbrich N, Zimmermann U, Walther R, Ekkernkamp A, Sckell A, Kramer A, Burchardt M, Lillig CH, Stope MB - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Notably, co-administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely neutralized CAP effects by NAC uptake and rapid conversion to glutathione (GSH).Vitamin C could not counteract the CAP induced effects on cell growth.We assume that the general intracellular redox homeostasis, especially the levels of cellular GSH and peroxidases such as peroxiredoxins affect the outcome of the CAP treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.

ABSTRACT
One of the promising possibilities of the clinical application of cold plasma, so-called cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), is its application on malignant cells and cancer tissue using its anti-neoplastic effects, primarily through the delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS). In this study, we investigated the impact of CAP on cellular proliferation and consecutive molecular response mechanisms in established prostate cancer (PC) cell lines. PC cells showed a significantly reduced cell growth following CAP treatment as a result of both an immediate increase of intracellular peroxide levels and through the induction of apoptosis indicated by annexin V assay, TUNEL assay, and the evaluation of changes in nuclear morphology. Notably, co-administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely neutralized CAP effects by NAC uptake and rapid conversion to glutathione (GSH). Vitamin C could not counteract the CAP induced effects on cell growth. In summary, relatively short treatments with CAP of 10 seconds were sufficient to induce a significant inhibition of cancer proliferation, as observed for the first time in urogenital cancer. Therefore, it is important to understand the mode of CAP related cell death and clarify and optimize CAP as cancer therapy. Increased levels of peroxides can alter redox-regulated signaling pathways and can lead to growth arrest and apoptosis. We assume that the general intracellular redox homeostasis, especially the levels of cellular GSH and peroxidases such as peroxiredoxins affect the outcome of the CAP treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) source.(A) Plasma jet kINPen09 (Neoplas GmbH, Greifswald, Germany), (B) schematic reconstruction of kINPen09 and composition of physical plasma.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488447&req=5

pone.0130350.g001: The cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) source.(A) Plasma jet kINPen09 (Neoplas GmbH, Greifswald, Germany), (B) schematic reconstruction of kINPen09 and composition of physical plasma.

Mentions: For generating CAP with argon as a carrier gas, the atmospheric pressure plasma jet kINPenMed (Neoplas GmbH, Greifswald, Germany) was utilized (Fig 1). Suspended cells were treated in 500 μl RPMI 1640 medium (PAN Biotech, Aidenbach, Germany) on an uncoated cell culture plate. The major reason for cell treatment in suspension was to avoid any side effects from the CAP source when treating adherent cells, i.e. mechanical damage and drying. Proliferation assays were propagated with 3x104 LNCaP and PC-3 cells. Further assays and Western Blot analysis were performed with 6x105 LNCaP and PC-3 cells The CAP source was applied for 10 s and controls were treated with non-ionized argon gas for 10 s, respectively. Following CAP treatment cells were immediately transferred to poly-L-lysine (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, USA) coated cell culture plates and were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium for indicated time points. For CAP treatment with the kINPen09 the following setting was used: Argon gas flow: 3 l/min; supply voltage = 65 V DC; frequency: 1.1 MHz; exposure time: 10 s. Control cells: Argon gas flow: 3 l/min; exposure time: 10 s [18, 7].


Cold Atmospheric Plasma Treatment Induces Anti-Proliferative Effects in Prostate Cancer Cells by Redox and Apoptotic Signaling Pathways.

Weiss M, Gümbel D, Hanschmann EM, Mandelkow R, Gelbrich N, Zimmermann U, Walther R, Ekkernkamp A, Sckell A, Kramer A, Burchardt M, Lillig CH, Stope MB - PLoS ONE (2015)

The cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) source.(A) Plasma jet kINPen09 (Neoplas GmbH, Greifswald, Germany), (B) schematic reconstruction of kINPen09 and composition of physical plasma.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488447&req=5

pone.0130350.g001: The cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) source.(A) Plasma jet kINPen09 (Neoplas GmbH, Greifswald, Germany), (B) schematic reconstruction of kINPen09 and composition of physical plasma.
Mentions: For generating CAP with argon as a carrier gas, the atmospheric pressure plasma jet kINPenMed (Neoplas GmbH, Greifswald, Germany) was utilized (Fig 1). Suspended cells were treated in 500 μl RPMI 1640 medium (PAN Biotech, Aidenbach, Germany) on an uncoated cell culture plate. The major reason for cell treatment in suspension was to avoid any side effects from the CAP source when treating adherent cells, i.e. mechanical damage and drying. Proliferation assays were propagated with 3x104 LNCaP and PC-3 cells. Further assays and Western Blot analysis were performed with 6x105 LNCaP and PC-3 cells The CAP source was applied for 10 s and controls were treated with non-ionized argon gas for 10 s, respectively. Following CAP treatment cells were immediately transferred to poly-L-lysine (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, USA) coated cell culture plates and were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium for indicated time points. For CAP treatment with the kINPen09 the following setting was used: Argon gas flow: 3 l/min; supply voltage = 65 V DC; frequency: 1.1 MHz; exposure time: 10 s. Control cells: Argon gas flow: 3 l/min; exposure time: 10 s [18, 7].

Bottom Line: Notably, co-administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely neutralized CAP effects by NAC uptake and rapid conversion to glutathione (GSH).Vitamin C could not counteract the CAP induced effects on cell growth.We assume that the general intracellular redox homeostasis, especially the levels of cellular GSH and peroxidases such as peroxiredoxins affect the outcome of the CAP treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.

ABSTRACT
One of the promising possibilities of the clinical application of cold plasma, so-called cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), is its application on malignant cells and cancer tissue using its anti-neoplastic effects, primarily through the delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS). In this study, we investigated the impact of CAP on cellular proliferation and consecutive molecular response mechanisms in established prostate cancer (PC) cell lines. PC cells showed a significantly reduced cell growth following CAP treatment as a result of both an immediate increase of intracellular peroxide levels and through the induction of apoptosis indicated by annexin V assay, TUNEL assay, and the evaluation of changes in nuclear morphology. Notably, co-administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely neutralized CAP effects by NAC uptake and rapid conversion to glutathione (GSH). Vitamin C could not counteract the CAP induced effects on cell growth. In summary, relatively short treatments with CAP of 10 seconds were sufficient to induce a significant inhibition of cancer proliferation, as observed for the first time in urogenital cancer. Therefore, it is important to understand the mode of CAP related cell death and clarify and optimize CAP as cancer therapy. Increased levels of peroxides can alter redox-regulated signaling pathways and can lead to growth arrest and apoptosis. We assume that the general intracellular redox homeostasis, especially the levels of cellular GSH and peroxidases such as peroxiredoxins affect the outcome of the CAP treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus