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Behavior of Ants Escaping from a Single-Exit Room.

Wang S, Lv W, Song W - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The ants formed several groups as they moved toward the exit to escape.We measured the time intervals between individual escapes in six versions of the experiment, each containing an exit of a different width, to quantify the movement of the groups.We also investigated the relationship between the number of ants in a group and the group flow rate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, China.

ABSTRACT
To study the rules of ant behavior and group-formation phenomena, we examined the behaviors of Camponotus japonicus, a species of large ant, in a range of situations. For these experiments, ants were placed inside a rectangular chamber with a single exit that also contained a filter paper soaked in citronella oil, a powerful repellent. The ants formed several groups as they moved toward the exit to escape. We measured the time intervals between individual escapes in six versions of the experiment, each containing an exit of a different width, to quantify the movement of the groups. As the ants exited the chamber, the time intervals between individual escapes changed and the frequency distribution of the time intervals exhibited exponential decay. We also investigated the relationship between the number of ants in a group and the group flow rate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Q (mean flow rate) of all of experimental repetitions for the six different exit widths.The six exit widths were 1w (0.5 cm), 2w (1.0 cm), 3w (1.5 cm), 4w (2.0 cm), 5w (2.5 cm), and 6w (3.0 cm). The square represents the Q (mean flow rate) for each exit width. The data indicate no obvious linear relationship between Q (mean flow rate) and d (exit size).
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pone.0131784.g005: Q (mean flow rate) of all of experimental repetitions for the six different exit widths.The six exit widths were 1w (0.5 cm), 2w (1.0 cm), 3w (1.5 cm), 4w (2.0 cm), 5w (2.5 cm), and 6w (3.0 cm). The square represents the Q (mean flow rate) for each exit width. The data indicate no obvious linear relationship between Q (mean flow rate) and d (exit size).

Mentions: In this equation, pf denotes the frequency of ants exiting at different time intervals. The nonlinear-fitting parameters (α, β and ε) are constants for each value of d (exit width). The parameter β is an important quantity for characterizing these distributions. The value of β was 3.17, 2.95, 2.79, 1.81, 1.47 and 1.50 for the exit sizes of 1w = 0.5 cm, 2w = 1.0 cm, 3w = 1.5 cm, 4w = 2.0 cm, 5w = 2.5 cm, and 6w = 3.0 cm, respectively. A plot of β versus d is displayed in Fig 4. A trend in which the value of β decreased when d increased was evident. As the mean time interval is the inverse of Q (the mean flow rate), we explored the relationship between Q and d (Fig 5) and found no obvious linear relationship between these variables. This result differs from the result found for human evacuation under normal conditions, where the flow rate was found to depend linearly on d [20].


Behavior of Ants Escaping from a Single-Exit Room.

Wang S, Lv W, Song W - PLoS ONE (2015)

Q (mean flow rate) of all of experimental repetitions for the six different exit widths.The six exit widths were 1w (0.5 cm), 2w (1.0 cm), 3w (1.5 cm), 4w (2.0 cm), 5w (2.5 cm), and 6w (3.0 cm). The square represents the Q (mean flow rate) for each exit width. The data indicate no obvious linear relationship between Q (mean flow rate) and d (exit size).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488427&req=5

pone.0131784.g005: Q (mean flow rate) of all of experimental repetitions for the six different exit widths.The six exit widths were 1w (0.5 cm), 2w (1.0 cm), 3w (1.5 cm), 4w (2.0 cm), 5w (2.5 cm), and 6w (3.0 cm). The square represents the Q (mean flow rate) for each exit width. The data indicate no obvious linear relationship between Q (mean flow rate) and d (exit size).
Mentions: In this equation, pf denotes the frequency of ants exiting at different time intervals. The nonlinear-fitting parameters (α, β and ε) are constants for each value of d (exit width). The parameter β is an important quantity for characterizing these distributions. The value of β was 3.17, 2.95, 2.79, 1.81, 1.47 and 1.50 for the exit sizes of 1w = 0.5 cm, 2w = 1.0 cm, 3w = 1.5 cm, 4w = 2.0 cm, 5w = 2.5 cm, and 6w = 3.0 cm, respectively. A plot of β versus d is displayed in Fig 4. A trend in which the value of β decreased when d increased was evident. As the mean time interval is the inverse of Q (the mean flow rate), we explored the relationship between Q and d (Fig 5) and found no obvious linear relationship between these variables. This result differs from the result found for human evacuation under normal conditions, where the flow rate was found to depend linearly on d [20].

Bottom Line: The ants formed several groups as they moved toward the exit to escape.We measured the time intervals between individual escapes in six versions of the experiment, each containing an exit of a different width, to quantify the movement of the groups.We also investigated the relationship between the number of ants in a group and the group flow rate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, China.

ABSTRACT
To study the rules of ant behavior and group-formation phenomena, we examined the behaviors of Camponotus japonicus, a species of large ant, in a range of situations. For these experiments, ants were placed inside a rectangular chamber with a single exit that also contained a filter paper soaked in citronella oil, a powerful repellent. The ants formed several groups as they moved toward the exit to escape. We measured the time intervals between individual escapes in six versions of the experiment, each containing an exit of a different width, to quantify the movement of the groups. As the ants exited the chamber, the time intervals between individual escapes changed and the frequency distribution of the time intervals exhibited exponential decay. We also investigated the relationship between the number of ants in a group and the group flow rate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus