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Real-time intraocular pressure measurement during phacoemulsification in dogs ex vivo.

Kang S, Park S, Noh H, Kwak J, Seo K - J. Vet. Med. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: The mean IOP in the irrigation/aspiration stage was significantly higher than that in the sculpt-segment removal stage at the same BH.The ultrasound time and irrigation fluid volume were greater with the 3.2 mm than the 3.0 mm CCIs.Therefore, fluidic parameters during each stage could be reassessed and adjusted to reduce complications arising from an elevated IOP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
This study was performed to evaluate changes in intraocular pressure (IOP) during standard coaxial phacoemulsification using 4 different bottle heights (BHs) and 2 different incision sizes. Coaxial phacoemulsification was performed with a venturi-based machine in 8 enucleated canine eyes through 3.0 and 3.2 mm clear corneal incisions (CCIs). A pressure transducer inserted in the peripheral cornea monitored the IOP in real-time. The surgery was subdivided into 4 stages: sculpt-segment removal, irrigation/aspiration, capsular polishing and viscoelastic removal. The mean IOP and the difference between the maximum and minimum IOPs were calculated at each stage and compared. The ultrasound time and volume of irrigation fluid used were recorded. The mean IOP increased with an elevation in the BH. The mean IOP in the irrigation/aspiration stage was significantly higher than that in the sculpt-segment removal stage at the same BH. The difference between the maximum and minimum IOP at each stage was greater in the 3.2 mm than the 3.0 mm CCIs, although the mean IOP was lower with the 3.2 mm than the 3.0 mm CCIs. The ultrasound time and irrigation fluid volume were greater with the 3.2 mm than the 3.0 mm CCIs. Therefore, fluidic parameters during each stage could be reassessed and adjusted to reduce complications arising from an elevated IOP. Phacoemulsification with 3.0 mm CCIs at a lower BH might lead to less stress on the eye from IOP fluctuations, ultrasound energy and irrigation fluid.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic diagram of real-time IOP measurement during phacoemulsification.
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fig_001: Schematic diagram of real-time IOP measurement during phacoemulsification.

Mentions: IOP recording: A pressure transducer was connected to the enucleatedcanine eye to directly measure the IOP. The measuring system consisted of the following fourparts: a 26 G needle, a pressure transducer (List No. 42584-05; Hospira, Inc., Lake Forest,IL, U.S.A.), a monitoring cable (List No. 42661-40; Hospira, Inc.) and a monitor(Datex-Ohmeda S/5, Helsinki, Finland). The pressure transducer was calibrated on a mercurymanometer (Dwyer Flex-Tube® U-Tube Manometer, Dwyer Instruments, Inc., Michigan,IN, U.S.A.) before the measurements. The pressure on the monitor was set to zero when the 26G needle, pressure transducer and the enucleated canine eye were located at the same height.The calibrated pressure transducer was inserted through the peripheral cornea. The sharp 26G needle tip of the pressure transducer was located in the anterior chamber at the sixo’clock position of the limbus. The monitor instantly showed real-time IOP. A dataacquisition system (Datex-Ohmeda S/5 Collect, Helsinki, Finland) was connected to themeasuring system and automatically recorded multipoint IOPs during each stage. A drop oftissue adhesive (Vetbond®, 3M, Saint Paul, MN, U.S.A.) was applied between theneedle and the cornea to prevent it from being pulled out of the cornea due to changes inthe anterior chamber depth during phacoemulsification (Figs. 1 and 2Fig. 1.


Real-time intraocular pressure measurement during phacoemulsification in dogs ex vivo.

Kang S, Park S, Noh H, Kwak J, Seo K - J. Vet. Med. Sci. (2015)

Schematic diagram of real-time IOP measurement during phacoemulsification.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488405&req=5

fig_001: Schematic diagram of real-time IOP measurement during phacoemulsification.
Mentions: IOP recording: A pressure transducer was connected to the enucleatedcanine eye to directly measure the IOP. The measuring system consisted of the following fourparts: a 26 G needle, a pressure transducer (List No. 42584-05; Hospira, Inc., Lake Forest,IL, U.S.A.), a monitoring cable (List No. 42661-40; Hospira, Inc.) and a monitor(Datex-Ohmeda S/5, Helsinki, Finland). The pressure transducer was calibrated on a mercurymanometer (Dwyer Flex-Tube® U-Tube Manometer, Dwyer Instruments, Inc., Michigan,IN, U.S.A.) before the measurements. The pressure on the monitor was set to zero when the 26G needle, pressure transducer and the enucleated canine eye were located at the same height.The calibrated pressure transducer was inserted through the peripheral cornea. The sharp 26G needle tip of the pressure transducer was located in the anterior chamber at the sixo’clock position of the limbus. The monitor instantly showed real-time IOP. A dataacquisition system (Datex-Ohmeda S/5 Collect, Helsinki, Finland) was connected to themeasuring system and automatically recorded multipoint IOPs during each stage. A drop oftissue adhesive (Vetbond®, 3M, Saint Paul, MN, U.S.A.) was applied between theneedle and the cornea to prevent it from being pulled out of the cornea due to changes inthe anterior chamber depth during phacoemulsification (Figs. 1 and 2Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: The mean IOP in the irrigation/aspiration stage was significantly higher than that in the sculpt-segment removal stage at the same BH.The ultrasound time and irrigation fluid volume were greater with the 3.2 mm than the 3.0 mm CCIs.Therefore, fluidic parameters during each stage could be reassessed and adjusted to reduce complications arising from an elevated IOP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
This study was performed to evaluate changes in intraocular pressure (IOP) during standard coaxial phacoemulsification using 4 different bottle heights (BHs) and 2 different incision sizes. Coaxial phacoemulsification was performed with a venturi-based machine in 8 enucleated canine eyes through 3.0 and 3.2 mm clear corneal incisions (CCIs). A pressure transducer inserted in the peripheral cornea monitored the IOP in real-time. The surgery was subdivided into 4 stages: sculpt-segment removal, irrigation/aspiration, capsular polishing and viscoelastic removal. The mean IOP and the difference between the maximum and minimum IOPs were calculated at each stage and compared. The ultrasound time and volume of irrigation fluid used were recorded. The mean IOP increased with an elevation in the BH. The mean IOP in the irrigation/aspiration stage was significantly higher than that in the sculpt-segment removal stage at the same BH. The difference between the maximum and minimum IOP at each stage was greater in the 3.2 mm than the 3.0 mm CCIs, although the mean IOP was lower with the 3.2 mm than the 3.0 mm CCIs. The ultrasound time and irrigation fluid volume were greater with the 3.2 mm than the 3.0 mm CCIs. Therefore, fluidic parameters during each stage could be reassessed and adjusted to reduce complications arising from an elevated IOP. Phacoemulsification with 3.0 mm CCIs at a lower BH might lead to less stress on the eye from IOP fluctuations, ultrasound energy and irrigation fluid.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus