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Accurate Alternative Measurements for Female Lifetime Reproductive Success in Drosophila melanogaster.

Nguyen TT, Moehring AJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: However, accurately measuring fitness is often difficult, and appropriate fitness surrogates need to be identified.Here we demonstrate that the short-term measure of reproductive success across five days provides a reasonable prediction of an individual's total lifetime reproductive success in Drosophila melanogaster.However, the lifetime reproductive success of a female that has only mated once is not correlated to the lifetime reproductive success of a female that is allowed to mate multiple times, demonstrating that these measures should not serve as surrogates nor be used to make inferences about one another.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Western University, London, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Fitness is an individual's ability to survive and reproduce, and is an important concept in evolutionary biology. However, accurately measuring fitness is often difficult, and appropriate fitness surrogates need to be identified. Lifetime reproductive success, the total progeny an organism can produce in their lifetime, is thought to be a suitable proxy for fitness, but the measure of an organism's reproductive output across a lifetime can be difficult or impossible to obtain. Here we demonstrate that the short-term measure of reproductive success across five days provides a reasonable prediction of an individual's total lifetime reproductive success in Drosophila melanogaster. However, the lifetime reproductive success of a female that has only mated once is not correlated to the lifetime reproductive success of a female that is allowed to mate multiple times, demonstrating that these measures should not serve as surrogates nor be used to make inferences about one another.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Regression of late short term reproductive output on lifetime reproductive success.Late short-term reproductive success was measured as the total number of offspring eclosing during a seven day window after females were approximately 30 days old. Dashed lines represent the 95% CI.
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pone.0116679.g004: Regression of late short term reproductive output on lifetime reproductive success.Late short-term reproductive success was measured as the total number of offspring eclosing during a seven day window after females were approximately 30 days old. Dashed lines represent the 95% CI.

Mentions: A seven-day reproductive success window for older females (after approximately 30 days of offspring emergence) is a strong predictor for total lifetime reproductive success (Fig 4; Estimate = 0.0072 ± 0.0004 S.E., t (211) = 14.88, P <0.0001, pseudo R2 = 0.5083). The two-way ANOVA revealed a significant female line effect (Fig 5A; F (8, 866) = 8.2960, P < 0.0001) and significant male line effect (F (8, 866) = 7.7590, P < 0.0001) for the lifetime reproductive success of singly-mated females. No significant interaction was detected (F (30, 836) = 0.7170, P = 0.8680). Of note, the productivity from singly-mated flies was not a significant variable in determining productivity from multiply-mated flies (Fig 5B; χ2(1) = 0.0228, P = 0.8801).


Accurate Alternative Measurements for Female Lifetime Reproductive Success in Drosophila melanogaster.

Nguyen TT, Moehring AJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Regression of late short term reproductive output on lifetime reproductive success.Late short-term reproductive success was measured as the total number of offspring eclosing during a seven day window after females were approximately 30 days old. Dashed lines represent the 95% CI.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488368&req=5

pone.0116679.g004: Regression of late short term reproductive output on lifetime reproductive success.Late short-term reproductive success was measured as the total number of offspring eclosing during a seven day window after females were approximately 30 days old. Dashed lines represent the 95% CI.
Mentions: A seven-day reproductive success window for older females (after approximately 30 days of offspring emergence) is a strong predictor for total lifetime reproductive success (Fig 4; Estimate = 0.0072 ± 0.0004 S.E., t (211) = 14.88, P <0.0001, pseudo R2 = 0.5083). The two-way ANOVA revealed a significant female line effect (Fig 5A; F (8, 866) = 8.2960, P < 0.0001) and significant male line effect (F (8, 866) = 7.7590, P < 0.0001) for the lifetime reproductive success of singly-mated females. No significant interaction was detected (F (30, 836) = 0.7170, P = 0.8680). Of note, the productivity from singly-mated flies was not a significant variable in determining productivity from multiply-mated flies (Fig 5B; χ2(1) = 0.0228, P = 0.8801).

Bottom Line: However, accurately measuring fitness is often difficult, and appropriate fitness surrogates need to be identified.Here we demonstrate that the short-term measure of reproductive success across five days provides a reasonable prediction of an individual's total lifetime reproductive success in Drosophila melanogaster.However, the lifetime reproductive success of a female that has only mated once is not correlated to the lifetime reproductive success of a female that is allowed to mate multiple times, demonstrating that these measures should not serve as surrogates nor be used to make inferences about one another.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Western University, London, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Fitness is an individual's ability to survive and reproduce, and is an important concept in evolutionary biology. However, accurately measuring fitness is often difficult, and appropriate fitness surrogates need to be identified. Lifetime reproductive success, the total progeny an organism can produce in their lifetime, is thought to be a suitable proxy for fitness, but the measure of an organism's reproductive output across a lifetime can be difficult or impossible to obtain. Here we demonstrate that the short-term measure of reproductive success across five days provides a reasonable prediction of an individual's total lifetime reproductive success in Drosophila melanogaster. However, the lifetime reproductive success of a female that has only mated once is not correlated to the lifetime reproductive success of a female that is allowed to mate multiple times, demonstrating that these measures should not serve as surrogates nor be used to make inferences about one another.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus