Limits...
Similar Impacts of the Interaural Delay and Interaural Correlation on Binaural Gap Detection.

Kong L, Xie Z, Lu L, Qu T, Wu X, Yan J, Li L - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that the minimum duration of the binaural gap for its detection (i.e., duration threshold) increased exponentially as the interaural delay between the binaurally identical noises increased linearly from 0 to 8 ms.A linear relationship between the effect of interaural delay and that of interaural correlation was described for listeners participating in this study: a 1 ms increase in interaural delay appeared to correspond to a 0.07 decrease in interaural correlation specific to raising the duration threshold.Our results imply that a tradeoff may exist between the impacts of interaural correlation and interaural delay on the subjective representation of sounds delivered to two human ears.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, PKU-IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Peking University, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Beijing, PR China; Speech and Hearing Research Center, Key Laboratory on Machine Perception (Ministry of Education), Peking University, Beijing, PR China; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.

ABSTRACT
The subjective representation of the sounds delivered to the two ears of a human listener is closely associated with the interaural delay and correlation of these two-ear sounds. When the two-ear sounds, e.g., arbitrary noises, arrive simultaneously, the single auditory image of the binaurally identical noises becomes increasingly diffuse, and eventually separates into two auditory images as the interaural correlation decreases. When the interaural delay increases from zero to several milliseconds, the auditory image of the binaurally identical noises also changes from a single image to two distinct images. However, measuring the effect of these two factors on an identical group of participants has not been investigated. This study examined the impacts of interaural correlation and delay on detecting a binaurally uncorrelated fragment (interaural correlation = 0) embedded in the binaurally correlated noises (i.e., binaural gap or break in interaural correlation). We found that the minimum duration of the binaural gap for its detection (i.e., duration threshold) increased exponentially as the interaural delay between the binaurally identical noises increased linearly from 0 to 8 ms. When no interaural delay was introduced, the duration threshold also increased exponentially as the interaural correlation of the binaurally correlated noises decreased linearly from 1 to 0.4. A linear relationship between the effect of interaural delay and that of interaural correlation was described for listeners participating in this study: a 1 ms increase in interaural delay appeared to correspond to a 0.07 decrease in interaural correlation specific to raising the duration threshold. Our results imply that a tradeoff may exist between the impacts of interaural correlation and interaural delay on the subjective representation of sounds delivered to two human ears.

No MeSH data available.


Relationship between the interaural delay and marker correlation on detecting the binaural gap.Top panel (a): The solid curve shows the function for the effect of interaural delay on the duration threshold. The horizontal solid lines represent the duration threshold measured at each of the marker correlations (1, 0.85, 0.7, 0.55, and 0.4); the vertical dashed line represents the interaural delay computed from function at these duration thresholds. The filled circles depict the interaural delay and marker correlation with equivalent effect on the duration threshold. Middle panel (b): The solid curve shows the function for the effect of marker correlation on the duration threshold. The horizontal solid lines represent the duration threshold measured at each of the interaural delays (0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 ms); the vertical dashed line represents the marker correlation computed from function at these duration thresholds. The open circles depict the interaural delay and marker correlation with equivalent effect on the duration threshold. Lower panel (c): the solid line shows the best fitting function between the interaural delays and marker correlations from the five samples from the upper panel (filled circles) and five samples from middle panel (open circles); the equation of the best-fitting function is presented in the top left.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488353&req=5

pone.0126342.g003: Relationship between the interaural delay and marker correlation on detecting the binaural gap.Top panel (a): The solid curve shows the function for the effect of interaural delay on the duration threshold. The horizontal solid lines represent the duration threshold measured at each of the marker correlations (1, 0.85, 0.7, 0.55, and 0.4); the vertical dashed line represents the interaural delay computed from function at these duration thresholds. The filled circles depict the interaural delay and marker correlation with equivalent effect on the duration threshold. Middle panel (b): The solid curve shows the function for the effect of marker correlation on the duration threshold. The horizontal solid lines represent the duration threshold measured at each of the interaural delays (0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 ms); the vertical dashed line represents the marker correlation computed from function at these duration thresholds. The open circles depict the interaural delay and marker correlation with equivalent effect on the duration threshold. Lower panel (c): the solid line shows the best fitting function between the interaural delays and marker correlations from the five samples from the upper panel (filled circles) and five samples from middle panel (open circles); the equation of the best-fitting function is presented in the top left.

Mentions: The main goal of this study was to describe the mathematical relationship between the interaural delay and marker correlation. Using the best-fitting function curve obtained from Experiment 1 (Fig 1) and the duration-threshold values measured at the 5 marker correlations (1, 0.85, 0.70, 0.55, 0.40) from Experiment 2, the upper panel of Fig 3 (panel a) displays the 5 interaural delay values (along the abscissa) that are related to the same duration thresholds with the 5 marker correlation values (along the ordinate), respectively.


Similar Impacts of the Interaural Delay and Interaural Correlation on Binaural Gap Detection.

Kong L, Xie Z, Lu L, Qu T, Wu X, Yan J, Li L - PLoS ONE (2015)

Relationship between the interaural delay and marker correlation on detecting the binaural gap.Top panel (a): The solid curve shows the function for the effect of interaural delay on the duration threshold. The horizontal solid lines represent the duration threshold measured at each of the marker correlations (1, 0.85, 0.7, 0.55, and 0.4); the vertical dashed line represents the interaural delay computed from function at these duration thresholds. The filled circles depict the interaural delay and marker correlation with equivalent effect on the duration threshold. Middle panel (b): The solid curve shows the function for the effect of marker correlation on the duration threshold. The horizontal solid lines represent the duration threshold measured at each of the interaural delays (0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 ms); the vertical dashed line represents the marker correlation computed from function at these duration thresholds. The open circles depict the interaural delay and marker correlation with equivalent effect on the duration threshold. Lower panel (c): the solid line shows the best fitting function between the interaural delays and marker correlations from the five samples from the upper panel (filled circles) and five samples from middle panel (open circles); the equation of the best-fitting function is presented in the top left.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488353&req=5

pone.0126342.g003: Relationship between the interaural delay and marker correlation on detecting the binaural gap.Top panel (a): The solid curve shows the function for the effect of interaural delay on the duration threshold. The horizontal solid lines represent the duration threshold measured at each of the marker correlations (1, 0.85, 0.7, 0.55, and 0.4); the vertical dashed line represents the interaural delay computed from function at these duration thresholds. The filled circles depict the interaural delay and marker correlation with equivalent effect on the duration threshold. Middle panel (b): The solid curve shows the function for the effect of marker correlation on the duration threshold. The horizontal solid lines represent the duration threshold measured at each of the interaural delays (0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 ms); the vertical dashed line represents the marker correlation computed from function at these duration thresholds. The open circles depict the interaural delay and marker correlation with equivalent effect on the duration threshold. Lower panel (c): the solid line shows the best fitting function between the interaural delays and marker correlations from the five samples from the upper panel (filled circles) and five samples from middle panel (open circles); the equation of the best-fitting function is presented in the top left.
Mentions: The main goal of this study was to describe the mathematical relationship between the interaural delay and marker correlation. Using the best-fitting function curve obtained from Experiment 1 (Fig 1) and the duration-threshold values measured at the 5 marker correlations (1, 0.85, 0.70, 0.55, 0.40) from Experiment 2, the upper panel of Fig 3 (panel a) displays the 5 interaural delay values (along the abscissa) that are related to the same duration thresholds with the 5 marker correlation values (along the ordinate), respectively.

Bottom Line: We found that the minimum duration of the binaural gap for its detection (i.e., duration threshold) increased exponentially as the interaural delay between the binaurally identical noises increased linearly from 0 to 8 ms.A linear relationship between the effect of interaural delay and that of interaural correlation was described for listeners participating in this study: a 1 ms increase in interaural delay appeared to correspond to a 0.07 decrease in interaural correlation specific to raising the duration threshold.Our results imply that a tradeoff may exist between the impacts of interaural correlation and interaural delay on the subjective representation of sounds delivered to two human ears.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, PKU-IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Peking University, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Beijing, PR China; Speech and Hearing Research Center, Key Laboratory on Machine Perception (Ministry of Education), Peking University, Beijing, PR China; Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.

ABSTRACT
The subjective representation of the sounds delivered to the two ears of a human listener is closely associated with the interaural delay and correlation of these two-ear sounds. When the two-ear sounds, e.g., arbitrary noises, arrive simultaneously, the single auditory image of the binaurally identical noises becomes increasingly diffuse, and eventually separates into two auditory images as the interaural correlation decreases. When the interaural delay increases from zero to several milliseconds, the auditory image of the binaurally identical noises also changes from a single image to two distinct images. However, measuring the effect of these two factors on an identical group of participants has not been investigated. This study examined the impacts of interaural correlation and delay on detecting a binaurally uncorrelated fragment (interaural correlation = 0) embedded in the binaurally correlated noises (i.e., binaural gap or break in interaural correlation). We found that the minimum duration of the binaural gap for its detection (i.e., duration threshold) increased exponentially as the interaural delay between the binaurally identical noises increased linearly from 0 to 8 ms. When no interaural delay was introduced, the duration threshold also increased exponentially as the interaural correlation of the binaurally correlated noises decreased linearly from 1 to 0.4. A linear relationship between the effect of interaural delay and that of interaural correlation was described for listeners participating in this study: a 1 ms increase in interaural delay appeared to correspond to a 0.07 decrease in interaural correlation specific to raising the duration threshold. Our results imply that a tradeoff may exist between the impacts of interaural correlation and interaural delay on the subjective representation of sounds delivered to two human ears.

No MeSH data available.