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Cinnamon from the selection of traditional applications to its novel effects on the inhibition of angiogenesis in cancer cells and prevention of Alzheimer's disease, and a series of functions such as antioxidant, anticholesterol, antidiabetes, antibacterial, antifungal, nematicidal, acaracidal, and repellent activities.

Hamidpour R, Hamidpour M, Hamidpour S, Shahlari M - J Tradit Complement Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Cinnamon has been used traditionally in food preparations and as an herbal medicine to treat a variety of ailments and their symptoms.Cinnamon is known to have antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and other therapeutic properties.This article presents a comprehensive analysis of the botanical, chemical, and pharmacological aspects of cinnamon.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Herbal Medicine, Pars Bioscience LLC, Leawood, KS, USA.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this article is to use search engines such as PubMed and Scifinder to locate scholarly articles and reports pertaining to Cinnamon ( ròu guì), its novel effects, preparation, analysis, and use in the prevention and treatment of serious illnesses, such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer. Cinnamon has been used traditionally in food preparations and as an herbal medicine to treat a variety of ailments and their symptoms. Cinnamon is known to have antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and other therapeutic properties. New studies reaffirm the importance of cinnamon as a spice but also suggest that it may be a natural remedy to treat serious diseases such as type 2 diabetes, chronic digestion problems, cardiovascular diseases, and even cancer and Alzheimer's disease. This article presents a comprehensive analysis of the botanical, chemical, and pharmacological aspects of cinnamon.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) True cinnamon. (B) Cassia cinnamon. (Photographs by Pars Bioscience LLC, Leawood, KS, USA).
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fig1: (A) True cinnamon. (B) Cassia cinnamon. (Photographs by Pars Bioscience LLC, Leawood, KS, USA).

Mentions: Cinnamon (肉桂 ròu guì), which is derived from a Greek word that means sweet wood, comes from the inner bark of tropical evergreen cinnamon trees.1Cinnamomum (cinnamon) is a genus of the Lauraceae family, many of whose members are used as spices.2 There are two main varieties of cinnamon: the Ceylon or true cinnamon (Cinnamon zeylanicum Blume), which is grown in Sri Lanka and Southern India (Fig. 1A), and cassia (Cinnamom aromaticum Ness), which is grown in China, Indonesia, and Vietnam (Fig. 1B). Cassia, when dried, rolls into a tubular form known as a quill or cinnamon stick.1,3


Cinnamon from the selection of traditional applications to its novel effects on the inhibition of angiogenesis in cancer cells and prevention of Alzheimer's disease, and a series of functions such as antioxidant, anticholesterol, antidiabetes, antibacterial, antifungal, nematicidal, acaracidal, and repellent activities.

Hamidpour R, Hamidpour M, Hamidpour S, Shahlari M - J Tradit Complement Med (2015)

(A) True cinnamon. (B) Cassia cinnamon. (Photographs by Pars Bioscience LLC, Leawood, KS, USA).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488098&req=5

fig1: (A) True cinnamon. (B) Cassia cinnamon. (Photographs by Pars Bioscience LLC, Leawood, KS, USA).
Mentions: Cinnamon (肉桂 ròu guì), which is derived from a Greek word that means sweet wood, comes from the inner bark of tropical evergreen cinnamon trees.1Cinnamomum (cinnamon) is a genus of the Lauraceae family, many of whose members are used as spices.2 There are two main varieties of cinnamon: the Ceylon or true cinnamon (Cinnamon zeylanicum Blume), which is grown in Sri Lanka and Southern India (Fig. 1A), and cassia (Cinnamom aromaticum Ness), which is grown in China, Indonesia, and Vietnam (Fig. 1B). Cassia, when dried, rolls into a tubular form known as a quill or cinnamon stick.1,3

Bottom Line: Cinnamon has been used traditionally in food preparations and as an herbal medicine to treat a variety of ailments and their symptoms.Cinnamon is known to have antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and other therapeutic properties.This article presents a comprehensive analysis of the botanical, chemical, and pharmacological aspects of cinnamon.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Herbal Medicine, Pars Bioscience LLC, Leawood, KS, USA.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this article is to use search engines such as PubMed and Scifinder to locate scholarly articles and reports pertaining to Cinnamon ( ròu guì), its novel effects, preparation, analysis, and use in the prevention and treatment of serious illnesses, such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer. Cinnamon has been used traditionally in food preparations and as an herbal medicine to treat a variety of ailments and their symptoms. Cinnamon is known to have antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and other therapeutic properties. New studies reaffirm the importance of cinnamon as a spice but also suggest that it may be a natural remedy to treat serious diseases such as type 2 diabetes, chronic digestion problems, cardiovascular diseases, and even cancer and Alzheimer's disease. This article presents a comprehensive analysis of the botanical, chemical, and pharmacological aspects of cinnamon.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus