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Visible Light Induces Melanogenesis in Human Skin through a Photoadaptive Response.

Randhawa M, Seo I, Liebel F, Southall MD, Kollias N, Ruvolo E - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Although the contribution of the UV component of sunlight to skin damage has been established, few studies have examined the effects of non-UV solar radiation on skin physiology in terms of inflammation, and limited information is available regarding the role of visible light on pigmentation.The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of visible light on the pro-pigmentation pathways and melanin formation in skin.These findings have potential implications on the management of photo-aggravated pigmentary disorders, the proper use of sunscreens, and the treatment of depigmented lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Johnson and Johnson Skin Research Center, CPPW, a unit of Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies Inc., Skillman, New Jersey, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Visible light (400-700 nm) lies outside of the spectral range of what photobiologists define as deleterious radiation and as a result few studies have studied the effects of visible light range of wavelengths on skin. This oversight is important considering that during outdoors activities skin is exposed to the full solar spectrum, including visible light, and to multiple exposures at different times and doses. Although the contribution of the UV component of sunlight to skin damage has been established, few studies have examined the effects of non-UV solar radiation on skin physiology in terms of inflammation, and limited information is available regarding the role of visible light on pigmentation. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of visible light on the pro-pigmentation pathways and melanin formation in skin. Exposure to visible light in ex-vivo and clinical studies demonstrated an induction of pigmentation in skin by visible light. Results showed that a single exposure to visible light induced very little pigmentation whereas multiple exposures with visible light resulted in darker and sustained pigmentation. These findings have potential implications on the management of photo-aggravated pigmentary disorders, the proper use of sunscreens, and the treatment of depigmented lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relative expression of Tyrosinase gene expression in Visible Light-Exposed Skin Explants.Human abdominal skin biopsies were exposed to Visible light (150 J.cm-2 at day 1, 2, 3, 6, 7). Graph illustrates the relative expression in explants harvested day 3 and day 7 respectively.
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pone.0130949.g003: Relative expression of Tyrosinase gene expression in Visible Light-Exposed Skin Explants.Human abdominal skin biopsies were exposed to Visible light (150 J.cm-2 at day 1, 2, 3, 6, 7). Graph illustrates the relative expression in explants harvested day 3 and day 7 respectively.

Mentions: The explants were analyzed for gene assays at day 3 and day 7 after exposure with sham and VL treatments respectively. The respective explants were analyzed for Tyrosinase gene expression by QPCR. A significant increase in Tyrosinase gene expression by almost 3 fold was registered on day 7 as compared with the sham exposure (Fig 3); however, the expression level remained the same for Tyrosinase gene expression at day 3. Also it should be noted that the expression level of Tyrosinase remained the same in sham-treated explants both on day 3 and 7 (Fig 3).


Visible Light Induces Melanogenesis in Human Skin through a Photoadaptive Response.

Randhawa M, Seo I, Liebel F, Southall MD, Kollias N, Ruvolo E - PLoS ONE (2015)

Relative expression of Tyrosinase gene expression in Visible Light-Exposed Skin Explants.Human abdominal skin biopsies were exposed to Visible light (150 J.cm-2 at day 1, 2, 3, 6, 7). Graph illustrates the relative expression in explants harvested day 3 and day 7 respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488093&req=5

pone.0130949.g003: Relative expression of Tyrosinase gene expression in Visible Light-Exposed Skin Explants.Human abdominal skin biopsies were exposed to Visible light (150 J.cm-2 at day 1, 2, 3, 6, 7). Graph illustrates the relative expression in explants harvested day 3 and day 7 respectively.
Mentions: The explants were analyzed for gene assays at day 3 and day 7 after exposure with sham and VL treatments respectively. The respective explants were analyzed for Tyrosinase gene expression by QPCR. A significant increase in Tyrosinase gene expression by almost 3 fold was registered on day 7 as compared with the sham exposure (Fig 3); however, the expression level remained the same for Tyrosinase gene expression at day 3. Also it should be noted that the expression level of Tyrosinase remained the same in sham-treated explants both on day 3 and 7 (Fig 3).

Bottom Line: Although the contribution of the UV component of sunlight to skin damage has been established, few studies have examined the effects of non-UV solar radiation on skin physiology in terms of inflammation, and limited information is available regarding the role of visible light on pigmentation.The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of visible light on the pro-pigmentation pathways and melanin formation in skin.These findings have potential implications on the management of photo-aggravated pigmentary disorders, the proper use of sunscreens, and the treatment of depigmented lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Johnson and Johnson Skin Research Center, CPPW, a unit of Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies Inc., Skillman, New Jersey, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Visible light (400-700 nm) lies outside of the spectral range of what photobiologists define as deleterious radiation and as a result few studies have studied the effects of visible light range of wavelengths on skin. This oversight is important considering that during outdoors activities skin is exposed to the full solar spectrum, including visible light, and to multiple exposures at different times and doses. Although the contribution of the UV component of sunlight to skin damage has been established, few studies have examined the effects of non-UV solar radiation on skin physiology in terms of inflammation, and limited information is available regarding the role of visible light on pigmentation. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of visible light on the pro-pigmentation pathways and melanin formation in skin. Exposure to visible light in ex-vivo and clinical studies demonstrated an induction of pigmentation in skin by visible light. Results showed that a single exposure to visible light induced very little pigmentation whereas multiple exposures with visible light resulted in darker and sustained pigmentation. These findings have potential implications on the management of photo-aggravated pigmentary disorders, the proper use of sunscreens, and the treatment of depigmented lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus