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Association of Oxytocin Receptor Gene (OXTR) rs53576 Polymorphism with Sociality: A Meta-Analysis.

Li J, Zhao Y, Li R, Broster LS, Zhou C, Yang S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: However, the pattern of published results is inconsistent.However, the meta-analyses did not detect significant genetic association between rs53576 and close relationships (Cohen's d = 0.01, p = .64).In conclusion, genetic variation in the rs53576 influences general sociality, which further implies that it is worthy to systematically examine whether the rs53576 is a valid genetic marker for socially related psychiatric disorders.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Education, Dali University, Dali, China.

ABSTRACT
A common variant in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR), rs53576, has been broadly linked to socially related personality traits and behaviors. However, the pattern of published results is inconsistent. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to comprehensively evaluate the association. The literature was searched for relevant studies and effect sizes between individuals homozygous for the G allele (GG) and individuals with A allele carriers (AA/AG). Specifically, two indices of sociality were evaluated independently: i) general sociality (24 samples, n = 4955), i.e., how an individual responds to other people in general; and ii) close relationships (15 samples, n = 5262), i.e., how an individual responds to individuals with closed connections (parent-child or romantic relationship). We found positive association between the rs53576 polymorphism and general sociality (Cohen's d = 0.11, p = .02); G allele homozygotes had higher general sociality than the A allele carriers. However, the meta-analyses did not detect significant genetic association between rs53576 and close relationships (Cohen's d = 0.01, p = .64). In conclusion, genetic variation in the rs53576 influences general sociality, which further implies that it is worthy to systematically examine whether the rs53576 is a valid genetic marker for socially related psychiatric disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The association between rs53576 polymorphism and general sociality.A) Magnitudes of effect size for the association between rs53576 polymorphism and general sociality are illustrated by the forest plot (AA + GA vs. GG). Boxes represent the effect size (Cohen’s d) for each sample in the analysis; the size of the boxes represents the weighting for each study; lines represent the .95 confidence interval for each effect size; and the diamond represents the overall effect of the meta-analysis, which was obtained by a random effects model. B) Publication bias is illustrated by the funnel plot. The horizontal axis represents the effect size of each study. The vertical axis represents the size of each study (indexed by the standard error of the effect size within each study). In consequence, large studies appear towards the top of the graph and small studies appear towards the bottom of the graph. A vertical line indicates the estimated overall effect size. A confidence interval region is drawn around this value with bounds equal to ± 1.96 standard error. In the absence of publication bias, the studies will be distributed symmetrically around the vertical line. Otherwise, the studies will be distributed asymmetrically.
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pone.0131820.g002: The association between rs53576 polymorphism and general sociality.A) Magnitudes of effect size for the association between rs53576 polymorphism and general sociality are illustrated by the forest plot (AA + GA vs. GG). Boxes represent the effect size (Cohen’s d) for each sample in the analysis; the size of the boxes represents the weighting for each study; lines represent the .95 confidence interval for each effect size; and the diamond represents the overall effect of the meta-analysis, which was obtained by a random effects model. B) Publication bias is illustrated by the funnel plot. The horizontal axis represents the effect size of each study. The vertical axis represents the size of each study (indexed by the standard error of the effect size within each study). In consequence, large studies appear towards the top of the graph and small studies appear towards the bottom of the graph. A vertical line indicates the estimated overall effect size. A confidence interval region is drawn around this value with bounds equal to ± 1.96 standard error. In the absence of publication bias, the studies will be distributed symmetrically around the vertical line. Otherwise, the studies will be distributed asymmetrically.

Mentions: Eighteen studies [10–15,25,27,30–31,37–44] comprising twenty-four independent samples (Table 1) contributed to the meta-analysis of general sociality (total number of participants = 4955). As expected, there was evidence of between-study heterogeneity (Q = 40.08, p = .02). Critically, the random effects analysis indicated an association (Cohen’s d = 0.11, 95% CI = [0.02, 0.21], Z = 2.28, p = .02) such that G allele homozygotes had higher general sociality than A allele carriers (Fig 2A). The Begg’s test indicated no evidence of publication bias (Kendall's tau = 0.09, p = .54) (Fig 2B). Because the sensitivity analysis indicated that pattern of results was similar after removal of any individual sample from the meta-analysis (i.e., all Cohen’s ds > = 0.09, ps < .05), the association observed in the meta-analysis was considered unlikely to be accounted for by any single outlying sample. Finally, meta-regression analyses suggested that the association was not significantly affected by sex (number of studies included (k) = 24, p = .20), age (k = 21, p = .31), or ethnicity (k = 24, p = .48).


Association of Oxytocin Receptor Gene (OXTR) rs53576 Polymorphism with Sociality: A Meta-Analysis.

Li J, Zhao Y, Li R, Broster LS, Zhou C, Yang S - PLoS ONE (2015)

The association between rs53576 polymorphism and general sociality.A) Magnitudes of effect size for the association between rs53576 polymorphism and general sociality are illustrated by the forest plot (AA + GA vs. GG). Boxes represent the effect size (Cohen’s d) for each sample in the analysis; the size of the boxes represents the weighting for each study; lines represent the .95 confidence interval for each effect size; and the diamond represents the overall effect of the meta-analysis, which was obtained by a random effects model. B) Publication bias is illustrated by the funnel plot. The horizontal axis represents the effect size of each study. The vertical axis represents the size of each study (indexed by the standard error of the effect size within each study). In consequence, large studies appear towards the top of the graph and small studies appear towards the bottom of the graph. A vertical line indicates the estimated overall effect size. A confidence interval region is drawn around this value with bounds equal to ± 1.96 standard error. In the absence of publication bias, the studies will be distributed symmetrically around the vertical line. Otherwise, the studies will be distributed asymmetrically.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4488068&req=5

pone.0131820.g002: The association between rs53576 polymorphism and general sociality.A) Magnitudes of effect size for the association between rs53576 polymorphism and general sociality are illustrated by the forest plot (AA + GA vs. GG). Boxes represent the effect size (Cohen’s d) for each sample in the analysis; the size of the boxes represents the weighting for each study; lines represent the .95 confidence interval for each effect size; and the diamond represents the overall effect of the meta-analysis, which was obtained by a random effects model. B) Publication bias is illustrated by the funnel plot. The horizontal axis represents the effect size of each study. The vertical axis represents the size of each study (indexed by the standard error of the effect size within each study). In consequence, large studies appear towards the top of the graph and small studies appear towards the bottom of the graph. A vertical line indicates the estimated overall effect size. A confidence interval region is drawn around this value with bounds equal to ± 1.96 standard error. In the absence of publication bias, the studies will be distributed symmetrically around the vertical line. Otherwise, the studies will be distributed asymmetrically.
Mentions: Eighteen studies [10–15,25,27,30–31,37–44] comprising twenty-four independent samples (Table 1) contributed to the meta-analysis of general sociality (total number of participants = 4955). As expected, there was evidence of between-study heterogeneity (Q = 40.08, p = .02). Critically, the random effects analysis indicated an association (Cohen’s d = 0.11, 95% CI = [0.02, 0.21], Z = 2.28, p = .02) such that G allele homozygotes had higher general sociality than A allele carriers (Fig 2A). The Begg’s test indicated no evidence of publication bias (Kendall's tau = 0.09, p = .54) (Fig 2B). Because the sensitivity analysis indicated that pattern of results was similar after removal of any individual sample from the meta-analysis (i.e., all Cohen’s ds > = 0.09, ps < .05), the association observed in the meta-analysis was considered unlikely to be accounted for by any single outlying sample. Finally, meta-regression analyses suggested that the association was not significantly affected by sex (number of studies included (k) = 24, p = .20), age (k = 21, p = .31), or ethnicity (k = 24, p = .48).

Bottom Line: However, the pattern of published results is inconsistent.However, the meta-analyses did not detect significant genetic association between rs53576 and close relationships (Cohen's d = 0.01, p = .64).In conclusion, genetic variation in the rs53576 influences general sociality, which further implies that it is worthy to systematically examine whether the rs53576 is a valid genetic marker for socially related psychiatric disorders.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Education, Dali University, Dali, China.

ABSTRACT
A common variant in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR), rs53576, has been broadly linked to socially related personality traits and behaviors. However, the pattern of published results is inconsistent. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to comprehensively evaluate the association. The literature was searched for relevant studies and effect sizes between individuals homozygous for the G allele (GG) and individuals with A allele carriers (AA/AG). Specifically, two indices of sociality were evaluated independently: i) general sociality (24 samples, n = 4955), i.e., how an individual responds to other people in general; and ii) close relationships (15 samples, n = 5262), i.e., how an individual responds to individuals with closed connections (parent-child or romantic relationship). We found positive association between the rs53576 polymorphism and general sociality (Cohen's d = 0.11, p = .02); G allele homozygotes had higher general sociality than the A allele carriers. However, the meta-analyses did not detect significant genetic association between rs53576 and close relationships (Cohen's d = 0.01, p = .64). In conclusion, genetic variation in the rs53576 influences general sociality, which further implies that it is worthy to systematically examine whether the rs53576 is a valid genetic marker for socially related psychiatric disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus