Limits...
Effects of Different Types of Cognitive Training on Cognitive Function, Brain Structure, and Driving Safety in Senior Daily Drivers: A Pilot Study.

Nozawa T, Taki Y, Kanno A, Akimoto Y, Ihara M, Yokoyama R, Kotozaki Y, Nouchi R, Sekiguchi A, Takeuchi H, Miyauchi CM, Ogawa T, Goto T, Sunda T, Shimizu T, Tozuka E, Hirose S, Nanbu T, Kawashima R - Behav Neurol (2015)

Bottom Line: For cognitive function, only Group V showed significant improvements in processing speed and working memory.For driving safety, Group V showed significant improvements both in the driving aptitude test and in the on-road evaluations.The results support the effectiveness of the onboard training program in enhancing the elderly's abilities to drive safely and the potential advantages of a multimodal training approach.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Smart Ageing International Research Center, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Increasing proportion of the elderly in the driving population raises the importance of assuring their safety. We explored the effects of three different types of cognitive training on the cognitive function, brain structure, and driving safety of the elderly.

Methods: Thirty-seven healthy elderly daily drivers were randomly assigned to one of three training groups: Group V trained in a vehicle with a newly developed onboard cognitive training program, Group P trained with a similar program but on a personal computer, and Group C trained to solve a crossword puzzle. Before and after the 8-week training period, they underwent neuropsychological tests, structural brain magnetic resonance imaging, and driving safety tests.

Results: For cognitive function, only Group V showed significant improvements in processing speed and working memory. For driving safety, Group V showed significant improvements both in the driving aptitude test and in the on-road evaluations. Group P showed no significant improvements in either test, and Group C showed significant improvements in the driving aptitude but not in the on-road evaluations.

Conclusion: The results support the effectiveness of the onboard training program in enhancing the elderly's abilities to drive safely and the potential advantages of a multimodal training approach.

No MeSH data available.


Changes in driving safety measures in each training group. The measures are as follows: (a) the total grades obtained from the driving aptitude test unit and (b) the total grades obtained from the on-road driving safety test. The score changes were adjusted for age, sex, and Pre (baseline) scores. The error bars in the graphs show the standard errors of the mean (SEM) of the subjects in each group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487932&req=5

fig6: Changes in driving safety measures in each training group. The measures are as follows: (a) the total grades obtained from the driving aptitude test unit and (b) the total grades obtained from the on-road driving safety test. The score changes were adjusted for age, sex, and Pre (baseline) scores. The error bars in the graphs show the standard errors of the mean (SEM) of the subjects in each group.

Mentions: Figure 6 and Table 4 show the summaries of the intervention effects on the driving safety measures. Group V showed significant improvements in the driving aptitude (P = 0.015) and on-road evaluation (P = 0.040). Group P showed no significant improvements in either test. Group C showed significant improvements in driving aptitude (P = 0.015) but not in the on-road evaluation. The between-group differences in the driving safety measures were not significant.


Effects of Different Types of Cognitive Training on Cognitive Function, Brain Structure, and Driving Safety in Senior Daily Drivers: A Pilot Study.

Nozawa T, Taki Y, Kanno A, Akimoto Y, Ihara M, Yokoyama R, Kotozaki Y, Nouchi R, Sekiguchi A, Takeuchi H, Miyauchi CM, Ogawa T, Goto T, Sunda T, Shimizu T, Tozuka E, Hirose S, Nanbu T, Kawashima R - Behav Neurol (2015)

Changes in driving safety measures in each training group. The measures are as follows: (a) the total grades obtained from the driving aptitude test unit and (b) the total grades obtained from the on-road driving safety test. The score changes were adjusted for age, sex, and Pre (baseline) scores. The error bars in the graphs show the standard errors of the mean (SEM) of the subjects in each group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487932&req=5

fig6: Changes in driving safety measures in each training group. The measures are as follows: (a) the total grades obtained from the driving aptitude test unit and (b) the total grades obtained from the on-road driving safety test. The score changes were adjusted for age, sex, and Pre (baseline) scores. The error bars in the graphs show the standard errors of the mean (SEM) of the subjects in each group.
Mentions: Figure 6 and Table 4 show the summaries of the intervention effects on the driving safety measures. Group V showed significant improvements in the driving aptitude (P = 0.015) and on-road evaluation (P = 0.040). Group P showed no significant improvements in either test. Group C showed significant improvements in driving aptitude (P = 0.015) but not in the on-road evaluation. The between-group differences in the driving safety measures were not significant.

Bottom Line: For cognitive function, only Group V showed significant improvements in processing speed and working memory.For driving safety, Group V showed significant improvements both in the driving aptitude test and in the on-road evaluations.The results support the effectiveness of the onboard training program in enhancing the elderly's abilities to drive safely and the potential advantages of a multimodal training approach.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Smart Ageing International Research Center, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Increasing proportion of the elderly in the driving population raises the importance of assuring their safety. We explored the effects of three different types of cognitive training on the cognitive function, brain structure, and driving safety of the elderly.

Methods: Thirty-seven healthy elderly daily drivers were randomly assigned to one of three training groups: Group V trained in a vehicle with a newly developed onboard cognitive training program, Group P trained with a similar program but on a personal computer, and Group C trained to solve a crossword puzzle. Before and after the 8-week training period, they underwent neuropsychological tests, structural brain magnetic resonance imaging, and driving safety tests.

Results: For cognitive function, only Group V showed significant improvements in processing speed and working memory. For driving safety, Group V showed significant improvements both in the driving aptitude test and in the on-road evaluations. Group P showed no significant improvements in either test, and Group C showed significant improvements in the driving aptitude but not in the on-road evaluations.

Conclusion: The results support the effectiveness of the onboard training program in enhancing the elderly's abilities to drive safely and the potential advantages of a multimodal training approach.

No MeSH data available.