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The Effects of Mind-Body Interventions on Sleep Quality: A Systematic Review.

Neuendorf R, Wahbeh H, Chamine I, Yu J, Hutchison K, Oken BS - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Overall, 67 (60%) of studies reported a beneficial effect on at least one sleep outcome measure.The benefit of MBI needs to be better documented with objective outcomes as well as the mechanism of benefit elucidated.There is some evidence that MBI have a positive benefit on sleep quality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Helfgott Research Institute, National College of Natural Medicine, 049 SW Porter Street, Portland, OR 97201, USA.

ABSTRACT
Study Objectives. To evaluate the effect of mind-body interventions (MBI) on sleep. Methods. We reviewed randomized controlled MBI trials on adults (through 2013) with at least one sleep outcome measure. We searched eleven electronic databases and excluded studies on interventions not considering mind-body medicine. Studies were categorized by type of MBI, whether sleep was primary or secondary outcome measure and outcome type. Results. 1323 abstracts were screened, and 112 papers were included. Overall, 67 (60%) of studies reported a beneficial effect on at least one sleep outcome measure. Of the most common interventions, 13/23 studies using meditation, 21/30 using movement MBI, and 14/25 using relaxation reported at least some improvements in sleep. There were clear risks of bias for many studies reviewed, especially when sleep was not the main focus. Conclusions. MBI should be considered as a treatment option for patients with sleep disturbance. The benefit of MBI needs to be better documented with objective outcomes as well as the mechanism of benefit elucidated. There is some evidence that MBI have a positive benefit on sleep quality. Since sleep has a direct impact on many other health outcomes, future MBI trials should consider including sleep outcome measurements.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Study flow diagram.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Study flow diagram.

Mentions: A total of 2139 studies were identified (Figure 1). After removing duplicates, 1323 titles and abstracts were screened for inclusion criteria. 149 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility, and, of these, 112 were included in the final review (Table 1). Four of the included studies used multiple mind-body intervention groups and are listed in different categories.


The Effects of Mind-Body Interventions on Sleep Quality: A Systematic Review.

Neuendorf R, Wahbeh H, Chamine I, Yu J, Hutchison K, Oken BS - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Study flow diagram.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487927&req=5

fig1: Study flow diagram.
Mentions: A total of 2139 studies were identified (Figure 1). After removing duplicates, 1323 titles and abstracts were screened for inclusion criteria. 149 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility, and, of these, 112 were included in the final review (Table 1). Four of the included studies used multiple mind-body intervention groups and are listed in different categories.

Bottom Line: Overall, 67 (60%) of studies reported a beneficial effect on at least one sleep outcome measure.The benefit of MBI needs to be better documented with objective outcomes as well as the mechanism of benefit elucidated.There is some evidence that MBI have a positive benefit on sleep quality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Helfgott Research Institute, National College of Natural Medicine, 049 SW Porter Street, Portland, OR 97201, USA.

ABSTRACT
Study Objectives. To evaluate the effect of mind-body interventions (MBI) on sleep. Methods. We reviewed randomized controlled MBI trials on adults (through 2013) with at least one sleep outcome measure. We searched eleven electronic databases and excluded studies on interventions not considering mind-body medicine. Studies were categorized by type of MBI, whether sleep was primary or secondary outcome measure and outcome type. Results. 1323 abstracts were screened, and 112 papers were included. Overall, 67 (60%) of studies reported a beneficial effect on at least one sleep outcome measure. Of the most common interventions, 13/23 studies using meditation, 21/30 using movement MBI, and 14/25 using relaxation reported at least some improvements in sleep. There were clear risks of bias for many studies reviewed, especially when sleep was not the main focus. Conclusions. MBI should be considered as a treatment option for patients with sleep disturbance. The benefit of MBI needs to be better documented with objective outcomes as well as the mechanism of benefit elucidated. There is some evidence that MBI have a positive benefit on sleep quality. Since sleep has a direct impact on many other health outcomes, future MBI trials should consider including sleep outcome measurements.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus