Limits...
Robust optical fiber patch-cords for in vivo optogenetic experiments in rats.

Trujillo-Pisanty I, Sanio C, Chaudhri N, Shizgal P - MethodsX (2015)

Bottom Line: However, the design can be adapted for use with other common optical-fiber connectors.We have saved time and money by using this design in our optical self-stimulation experiments with rats, which are commonly several months long and last four to eleven hours per session.The main advantages are: •Long half-life.•Resistant to moderate rodent bites.•Suitable for long in vivo optogenetic experiments with large rodents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Studies in Behavioral Neurobiology (CSBN)/Groupe de recherche en neurobiologie comportementale, Department of Psychology. Concordia University, 7141 Sherbrooke Street West, Science Pavilion, room #244, H4B 1R6 Montréal, QC, Canada.

ABSTRACT
In vivo optogenetic experiments commonly employ long lengths of optical fiber to connect the light source (commonly a laser) to the optical fiber implants in the brain. Commercially available patch cords are expensive and break easily. Researchers have developed methods to build these cables in house for in vivo experiments with rodents [1-4]. However, the half-life of those patch cords is greatly reduced when they are used with behaving rats, which are strong enough to break the delicate cable tip and to bite through the optical fiber and furcation tubing. Based on [3] we have strengthened the patch-cord tip that connects to the optical implant, and we have incorporated multiple layers of shielding to produce more robust and resistant cladding. Here, we illustrate how to build these patch cords with FC or M3 connectors. However, the design can be adapted for use with other common optical-fiber connectors. We have saved time and money by using this design in our optical self-stimulation experiments with rats, which are commonly several months long and last four to eleven hours per session. The main advantages are: •Long half-life.•Resistant to moderate rodent bites.•Suitable for long in vivo optogenetic experiments with large rodents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) visual inspection. The light coming out from the patch cord tip should be concentric. (B) A ceramic sleeve is attached halfway through the tip of the patch cord. Inset: the ferrule from the implanted fiber on the rat’s head should occupy the other half, keeping both ferrules in direct contact with each other.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487924&req=5

fig0025: (A) visual inspection. The light coming out from the patch cord tip should be concentric. (B) A ceramic sleeve is attached halfway through the tip of the patch cord. Inset: the ferrule from the implanted fiber on the rat’s head should occupy the other half, keeping both ferrules in direct contact with each other.

Mentions: Step 12: Test the patch cord in the behavioral apparatus. Attach the patch-cord connector to the optical rotary joint (Fig. 4F) or the corresponding light output of your setup. Carefully point the patch cord tip toward a vertical non-reflective surface and turn on the light source (Caution: do not use full laser power in this test, and wear appropriate protective goggles, except when you are certain that the beam is pointing away from you, and you wish to view the pattern it forms on the non-reflective surface). A properly polished patch cord will produce a pattern of closely spaced concentric rings (Fig. 5A). Confirm that the desired optical power is emitted by the patch cord by using the photodiode sensor and the optical-power meter. Adjust the laser power to determine the maximal light output from the cord. If the patch cord is properly built and polished, the light loss should not exceed 15% per connection (top and bottom). It is best to provide “headroom” by using patch cords that exceed the required output. Avoid using patch cords that cannot transmit at least 10% more power than required in the experiment.


Robust optical fiber patch-cords for in vivo optogenetic experiments in rats.

Trujillo-Pisanty I, Sanio C, Chaudhri N, Shizgal P - MethodsX (2015)

(A) visual inspection. The light coming out from the patch cord tip should be concentric. (B) A ceramic sleeve is attached halfway through the tip of the patch cord. Inset: the ferrule from the implanted fiber on the rat’s head should occupy the other half, keeping both ferrules in direct contact with each other.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487924&req=5

fig0025: (A) visual inspection. The light coming out from the patch cord tip should be concentric. (B) A ceramic sleeve is attached halfway through the tip of the patch cord. Inset: the ferrule from the implanted fiber on the rat’s head should occupy the other half, keeping both ferrules in direct contact with each other.
Mentions: Step 12: Test the patch cord in the behavioral apparatus. Attach the patch-cord connector to the optical rotary joint (Fig. 4F) or the corresponding light output of your setup. Carefully point the patch cord tip toward a vertical non-reflective surface and turn on the light source (Caution: do not use full laser power in this test, and wear appropriate protective goggles, except when you are certain that the beam is pointing away from you, and you wish to view the pattern it forms on the non-reflective surface). A properly polished patch cord will produce a pattern of closely spaced concentric rings (Fig. 5A). Confirm that the desired optical power is emitted by the patch cord by using the photodiode sensor and the optical-power meter. Adjust the laser power to determine the maximal light output from the cord. If the patch cord is properly built and polished, the light loss should not exceed 15% per connection (top and bottom). It is best to provide “headroom” by using patch cords that exceed the required output. Avoid using patch cords that cannot transmit at least 10% more power than required in the experiment.

Bottom Line: However, the design can be adapted for use with other common optical-fiber connectors.We have saved time and money by using this design in our optical self-stimulation experiments with rats, which are commonly several months long and last four to eleven hours per session.The main advantages are: •Long half-life.•Resistant to moderate rodent bites.•Suitable for long in vivo optogenetic experiments with large rodents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Studies in Behavioral Neurobiology (CSBN)/Groupe de recherche en neurobiologie comportementale, Department of Psychology. Concordia University, 7141 Sherbrooke Street West, Science Pavilion, room #244, H4B 1R6 Montréal, QC, Canada.

ABSTRACT
In vivo optogenetic experiments commonly employ long lengths of optical fiber to connect the light source (commonly a laser) to the optical fiber implants in the brain. Commercially available patch cords are expensive and break easily. Researchers have developed methods to build these cables in house for in vivo experiments with rodents [1-4]. However, the half-life of those patch cords is greatly reduced when they are used with behaving rats, which are strong enough to break the delicate cable tip and to bite through the optical fiber and furcation tubing. Based on [3] we have strengthened the patch-cord tip that connects to the optical implant, and we have incorporated multiple layers of shielding to produce more robust and resistant cladding. Here, we illustrate how to build these patch cords with FC or M3 connectors. However, the design can be adapted for use with other common optical-fiber connectors. We have saved time and money by using this design in our optical self-stimulation experiments with rats, which are commonly several months long and last four to eleven hours per session. The main advantages are: •Long half-life.•Resistant to moderate rodent bites.•Suitable for long in vivo optogenetic experiments with large rodents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus