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Robust optical fiber patch-cords for in vivo optogenetic experiments in rats.

Trujillo-Pisanty I, Sanio C, Chaudhri N, Shizgal P - MethodsX (2015)

Bottom Line: However, the design can be adapted for use with other common optical-fiber connectors.We have saved time and money by using this design in our optical self-stimulation experiments with rats, which are commonly several months long and last four to eleven hours per session.The main advantages are: •Long half-life.•Resistant to moderate rodent bites.•Suitable for long in vivo optogenetic experiments with large rodents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Studies in Behavioral Neurobiology (CSBN)/Groupe de recherche en neurobiologie comportementale, Department of Psychology. Concordia University, 7141 Sherbrooke Street West, Science Pavilion, room #244, H4B 1R6 Montréal, QC, Canada.

ABSTRACT
In vivo optogenetic experiments commonly employ long lengths of optical fiber to connect the light source (commonly a laser) to the optical fiber implants in the brain. Commercially available patch cords are expensive and break easily. Researchers have developed methods to build these cables in house for in vivo experiments with rodents [1-4]. However, the half-life of those patch cords is greatly reduced when they are used with behaving rats, which are strong enough to break the delicate cable tip and to bite through the optical fiber and furcation tubing. Based on [3] we have strengthened the patch-cord tip that connects to the optical implant, and we have incorporated multiple layers of shielding to produce more robust and resistant cladding. Here, we illustrate how to build these patch cords with FC or M3 connectors. However, the design can be adapted for use with other common optical-fiber connectors. We have saved time and money by using this design in our optical self-stimulation experiments with rats, which are commonly several months long and last four to eleven hours per session. The main advantages are: •Long half-life.•Resistant to moderate rodent bites.•Suitable for long in vivo optogenetic experiments with large rodents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Making a groove at the edge of the fiber. Notice that the diamond wedge scribe is kept horizontal. Do not break the optical fiber core doing this. (B) An M3 connector with the leveled cut and the bolt. (C) The boot of the FC connector is inserted. The boot should be crimped-on tightly using the specialized crimping tool. (D) Inserting the optical fiber through the 3/64′′ shrink tubing. (E) Shrinking the 3/64′′ shrink tubing tightly onto the fiber. Make sure it is even, “bumps” would not allow the stainless steel compression spring to fit through. (F) Insert the small shrink tubing provided with the M3 connector over the new cladding. Push it all the way through but do not shrink it yet.
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fig0010: (A) Making a groove at the edge of the fiber. Notice that the diamond wedge scribe is kept horizontal. Do not break the optical fiber core doing this. (B) An M3 connector with the leveled cut and the bolt. (C) The boot of the FC connector is inserted. The boot should be crimped-on tightly using the specialized crimping tool. (D) Inserting the optical fiber through the 3/64′′ shrink tubing. (E) Shrinking the 3/64′′ shrink tubing tightly onto the fiber. Make sure it is even, “bumps” would not allow the stainless steel compression spring to fit through. (F) Insert the small shrink tubing provided with the M3 connector over the new cladding. Push it all the way through but do not shrink it yet.

Mentions: Step 4: Use the diamond scribe to make a small straight groove in the side of the optical fiber core, right at the edge of the hardened resin on the tip of the connector (Fig. 2A). Flick-off the protruding length of optical fiber core to leave a level surface. Avoid breaking the core with the diamond scribe.


Robust optical fiber patch-cords for in vivo optogenetic experiments in rats.

Trujillo-Pisanty I, Sanio C, Chaudhri N, Shizgal P - MethodsX (2015)

(A) Making a groove at the edge of the fiber. Notice that the diamond wedge scribe is kept horizontal. Do not break the optical fiber core doing this. (B) An M3 connector with the leveled cut and the bolt. (C) The boot of the FC connector is inserted. The boot should be crimped-on tightly using the specialized crimping tool. (D) Inserting the optical fiber through the 3/64′′ shrink tubing. (E) Shrinking the 3/64′′ shrink tubing tightly onto the fiber. Make sure it is even, “bumps” would not allow the stainless steel compression spring to fit through. (F) Insert the small shrink tubing provided with the M3 connector over the new cladding. Push it all the way through but do not shrink it yet.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487924&req=5

fig0010: (A) Making a groove at the edge of the fiber. Notice that the diamond wedge scribe is kept horizontal. Do not break the optical fiber core doing this. (B) An M3 connector with the leveled cut and the bolt. (C) The boot of the FC connector is inserted. The boot should be crimped-on tightly using the specialized crimping tool. (D) Inserting the optical fiber through the 3/64′′ shrink tubing. (E) Shrinking the 3/64′′ shrink tubing tightly onto the fiber. Make sure it is even, “bumps” would not allow the stainless steel compression spring to fit through. (F) Insert the small shrink tubing provided with the M3 connector over the new cladding. Push it all the way through but do not shrink it yet.
Mentions: Step 4: Use the diamond scribe to make a small straight groove in the side of the optical fiber core, right at the edge of the hardened resin on the tip of the connector (Fig. 2A). Flick-off the protruding length of optical fiber core to leave a level surface. Avoid breaking the core with the diamond scribe.

Bottom Line: However, the design can be adapted for use with other common optical-fiber connectors.We have saved time and money by using this design in our optical self-stimulation experiments with rats, which are commonly several months long and last four to eleven hours per session.The main advantages are: •Long half-life.•Resistant to moderate rodent bites.•Suitable for long in vivo optogenetic experiments with large rodents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Studies in Behavioral Neurobiology (CSBN)/Groupe de recherche en neurobiologie comportementale, Department of Psychology. Concordia University, 7141 Sherbrooke Street West, Science Pavilion, room #244, H4B 1R6 Montréal, QC, Canada.

ABSTRACT
In vivo optogenetic experiments commonly employ long lengths of optical fiber to connect the light source (commonly a laser) to the optical fiber implants in the brain. Commercially available patch cords are expensive and break easily. Researchers have developed methods to build these cables in house for in vivo experiments with rodents [1-4]. However, the half-life of those patch cords is greatly reduced when they are used with behaving rats, which are strong enough to break the delicate cable tip and to bite through the optical fiber and furcation tubing. Based on [3] we have strengthened the patch-cord tip that connects to the optical implant, and we have incorporated multiple layers of shielding to produce more robust and resistant cladding. Here, we illustrate how to build these patch cords with FC or M3 connectors. However, the design can be adapted for use with other common optical-fiber connectors. We have saved time and money by using this design in our optical self-stimulation experiments with rats, which are commonly several months long and last four to eleven hours per session. The main advantages are: •Long half-life.•Resistant to moderate rodent bites.•Suitable for long in vivo optogenetic experiments with large rodents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus