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Simplified Citrate Anticoagulation for CRRT Without Calcium Replacement.

Broman M, Klarin B, Sandin K, Carlsson O, Wieslander A, Sternby J, Godaly G - ASAIO J. (2015 Jul-Aug)

Bottom Line: This was successfully achieved by including citrate and calcium in all CRRT solutions.All postfilter ionized calcium levels were <0.5 mmol/L, that is, an anticoagulation effect was reached.This pilot study suggests that it is possible to perform regional citrate anticoagulation without the need for separate calcium infusion during CRRT.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: From the *Department of Clinical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; †Gambro Lundia AB, Lund, Sweden; ‡Department of Nephrology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; and §Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Glycobiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Since 2012, citrate anticoagulation is the recommended anticoagulation strategy for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). The main drawback using citrate as anticoagulant compared with heparin is the need for calcium replacement and the rigorous control of calcium levels. This study investigated the possibility to achieve anticoagulation while eliminating the need for calcium replacement. This was successfully achieved by including citrate and calcium in all CRRT solutions. Thereby the total calcium concentration was kept constant throughout the extracorporeal circuit, whereas the ionized calcium was kept at low levels enough to avoid clotting. Being a completely new concept, only five patients with acute renal failure were included in a short, prospective, intensely supervised nonrandomized pilot study. Systemic electrolyte levels and acid-base parameters were stable and remained within physiologic levels. Ionized calcium levels declined slightly initially but stabilized at 1.1 mmol/L. Plasma citrate concentrations stabilized at approximately 0.6 mmol/L. All postfilter ionized calcium levels were <0.5 mmol/L, that is, an anticoagulation effect was reached. All filter pressures were normal indicating no clotting problems, and no visible clotting was observed. No calcium replacement was needed. This pilot study suggests that it is possible to perform regional citrate anticoagulation without the need for separate calcium infusion during CRRT.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Values of HCO3−, pCO2, and pH during study treatment.
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Figure 5: Values of HCO3−, pCO2, and pH during study treatment.

Mentions: No alkalosis or acidosis occurred during the study period; pH, carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2), and bicarbonate (HCO3−) concentrations, as well as the calculated acid–base parameters, remained stable (Table 3 and Figure 5). Plasma concentrations of Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Cl− remained stable (Table 3). Phosphate (P−) concentrations decreased significantly at the start of the treatment but remained stable thereafter (Table 3).


Simplified Citrate Anticoagulation for CRRT Without Calcium Replacement.

Broman M, Klarin B, Sandin K, Carlsson O, Wieslander A, Sternby J, Godaly G - ASAIO J. (2015 Jul-Aug)

Values of HCO3−, pCO2, and pH during study treatment.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487873&req=5

Figure 5: Values of HCO3−, pCO2, and pH during study treatment.
Mentions: No alkalosis or acidosis occurred during the study period; pH, carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2), and bicarbonate (HCO3−) concentrations, as well as the calculated acid–base parameters, remained stable (Table 3 and Figure 5). Plasma concentrations of Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Cl− remained stable (Table 3). Phosphate (P−) concentrations decreased significantly at the start of the treatment but remained stable thereafter (Table 3).

Bottom Line: This was successfully achieved by including citrate and calcium in all CRRT solutions.All postfilter ionized calcium levels were <0.5 mmol/L, that is, an anticoagulation effect was reached.This pilot study suggests that it is possible to perform regional citrate anticoagulation without the need for separate calcium infusion during CRRT.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: From the *Department of Clinical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; †Gambro Lundia AB, Lund, Sweden; ‡Department of Nephrology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; and §Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Glycobiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Since 2012, citrate anticoagulation is the recommended anticoagulation strategy for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). The main drawback using citrate as anticoagulant compared with heparin is the need for calcium replacement and the rigorous control of calcium levels. This study investigated the possibility to achieve anticoagulation while eliminating the need for calcium replacement. This was successfully achieved by including citrate and calcium in all CRRT solutions. Thereby the total calcium concentration was kept constant throughout the extracorporeal circuit, whereas the ionized calcium was kept at low levels enough to avoid clotting. Being a completely new concept, only five patients with acute renal failure were included in a short, prospective, intensely supervised nonrandomized pilot study. Systemic electrolyte levels and acid-base parameters were stable and remained within physiologic levels. Ionized calcium levels declined slightly initially but stabilized at 1.1 mmol/L. Plasma citrate concentrations stabilized at approximately 0.6 mmol/L. All postfilter ionized calcium levels were <0.5 mmol/L, that is, an anticoagulation effect was reached. All filter pressures were normal indicating no clotting problems, and no visible clotting was observed. No calcium replacement was needed. This pilot study suggests that it is possible to perform regional citrate anticoagulation without the need for separate calcium infusion during CRRT.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus