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Does visualisation during urethrocystoscopy provide pain relief? Results of an observational study.

Koenig J, Sevinc S, Frohme C, Heers H, Hofmann R, Hegele A - BMC Urol (2015)

Bottom Line: An observational study was designed.In order to measure pain perception we used a numeric rating scale (NRS) 0 to 10.Visualisation during urethrocystoscopy procedures in general does not significantly decrease pain in patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology and Pediatric Urology, University hospital Marburg, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany. Koenigj4@students.uni-marburg.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: To measure the effects of real-time visualisation during urethrocystoscopy on pain in patients who underwent ambulatory urethrocystoscopy.

Methods: An observational study was designed. From June 2012 to June 2013 patients who had ambulatory urethrocystoscopy participated in the study. In order to measure pain perception we used a numeric rating scale (NRS) 0 to 10. Additional data was collected including gender, reason for intervention, use of a rigid or a flexible instrument and whether the patient had had urethrocystoscopy before.

Results: 185 patients were evaluated. 125 patients preferred to watch their urethrocystoscopy on a real-time video screen, 60 patients did not. There was no statistically relevant difference in pain perception between those patients who watched their urethrocystoscopy on a real-time video screen and those who did not (p = 0.063). However, men who were allowed to watch their flexible urethrocystoscopy experienced significantly less pain, than those who did not (p = 0.007). No such effects could be measured for rigid urethrocystoscopy (p = 0.317). Furthermore, women experienced significantly higher levels of pain during the urethrocystoscopy than men (p = 0.032).

Conclusions: Visualisation during urethrocystoscopy procedures in general does not significantly decrease pain in patients. Nevertheless, men who undergo flexible urethrocystoscopy should be offered to watch their procedure in real-time on a video screen. To make urethrocystoscopy less painful for both genders, especially for women, should be subject to further research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Significant different pain scores in patients undergoing flexible urethrocystoscopy with or without visualisation (p=0.007)
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Fig1: Significant different pain scores in patients undergoing flexible urethrocystoscopy with or without visualisation (p=0.007)

Mentions: When analysed separately patients who had flexible urethrocystoscopies, had significantly less pain when they were allowed to watch the procedure (2 (±2.0, range 0–8) vs 3.5 (±2.1, range 0–8), p = 0.007; see Fig. 1).Fig. 1


Does visualisation during urethrocystoscopy provide pain relief? Results of an observational study.

Koenig J, Sevinc S, Frohme C, Heers H, Hofmann R, Hegele A - BMC Urol (2015)

Significant different pain scores in patients undergoing flexible urethrocystoscopy with or without visualisation (p=0.007)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487843&req=5

Fig1: Significant different pain scores in patients undergoing flexible urethrocystoscopy with or without visualisation (p=0.007)
Mentions: When analysed separately patients who had flexible urethrocystoscopies, had significantly less pain when they were allowed to watch the procedure (2 (±2.0, range 0–8) vs 3.5 (±2.1, range 0–8), p = 0.007; see Fig. 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: An observational study was designed.In order to measure pain perception we used a numeric rating scale (NRS) 0 to 10.Visualisation during urethrocystoscopy procedures in general does not significantly decrease pain in patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology and Pediatric Urology, University hospital Marburg, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany. Koenigj4@students.uni-marburg.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: To measure the effects of real-time visualisation during urethrocystoscopy on pain in patients who underwent ambulatory urethrocystoscopy.

Methods: An observational study was designed. From June 2012 to June 2013 patients who had ambulatory urethrocystoscopy participated in the study. In order to measure pain perception we used a numeric rating scale (NRS) 0 to 10. Additional data was collected including gender, reason for intervention, use of a rigid or a flexible instrument and whether the patient had had urethrocystoscopy before.

Results: 185 patients were evaluated. 125 patients preferred to watch their urethrocystoscopy on a real-time video screen, 60 patients did not. There was no statistically relevant difference in pain perception between those patients who watched their urethrocystoscopy on a real-time video screen and those who did not (p = 0.063). However, men who were allowed to watch their flexible urethrocystoscopy experienced significantly less pain, than those who did not (p = 0.007). No such effects could be measured for rigid urethrocystoscopy (p = 0.317). Furthermore, women experienced significantly higher levels of pain during the urethrocystoscopy than men (p = 0.032).

Conclusions: Visualisation during urethrocystoscopy procedures in general does not significantly decrease pain in patients. Nevertheless, men who undergo flexible urethrocystoscopy should be offered to watch their procedure in real-time on a video screen. To make urethrocystoscopy less painful for both genders, especially for women, should be subject to further research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus