Limits...
Pitfalls and Limitations of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis of Urinary Bladder Cancer.

Lin WC, Chen JH - Transl Oncol (2015)

Bottom Line: Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a noninvasive functional magnetic resonance imaging technique.In addition, inadequate bladder distension, artifacts, thinness of bladder wall, cancerous mimickers of normal bladder wall and benign lesions, and variations in the manifestation of bladder cancer may interfere with diagnosis and monitoring of treatment.Recognition of these pitfalls and limitations can minimize their impact on image interpretation, and carefully applying the analyzed results and combining with pathologic grading and staging to clinical practice can contribute to the selection of an adequate treatment method to improve patient care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, China Medical University Hospital; No. 2, Yuh-Der Rd, Taichung 40447, Taiwan (R.O.C.); School of Medicine, China Medical University; No.91, Syueshih Rd, Taichung, 40402, Taiwan (R.O.C.).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A 41-year-old man presented with gross hematuria due to bladder cancer. Cystoscopy showed a bladder mass. Axial sections of DWI (left) and T2WI (middle) reveal a hyperintense lobulated contour mass (long arrows) in the depending portion of the bladder; and DCE (right) reveals a small early enhanced nodule within this mass, indicating that the tumor (short arrows) is hidden within the blood clot (long arrows).
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f0025: A 41-year-old man presented with gross hematuria due to bladder cancer. Cystoscopy showed a bladder mass. Axial sections of DWI (left) and T2WI (middle) reveal a hyperintense lobulated contour mass (long arrows) in the depending portion of the bladder; and DCE (right) reveals a small early enhanced nodule within this mass, indicating that the tumor (short arrows) is hidden within the blood clot (long arrows).


Pitfalls and Limitations of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis of Urinary Bladder Cancer.

Lin WC, Chen JH - Transl Oncol (2015)

A 41-year-old man presented with gross hematuria due to bladder cancer. Cystoscopy showed a bladder mass. Axial sections of DWI (left) and T2WI (middle) reveal a hyperintense lobulated contour mass (long arrows) in the depending portion of the bladder; and DCE (right) reveals a small early enhanced nodule within this mass, indicating that the tumor (short arrows) is hidden within the blood clot (long arrows).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487794&req=5

f0025: A 41-year-old man presented with gross hematuria due to bladder cancer. Cystoscopy showed a bladder mass. Axial sections of DWI (left) and T2WI (middle) reveal a hyperintense lobulated contour mass (long arrows) in the depending portion of the bladder; and DCE (right) reveals a small early enhanced nodule within this mass, indicating that the tumor (short arrows) is hidden within the blood clot (long arrows).
Bottom Line: Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a noninvasive functional magnetic resonance imaging technique.In addition, inadequate bladder distension, artifacts, thinness of bladder wall, cancerous mimickers of normal bladder wall and benign lesions, and variations in the manifestation of bladder cancer may interfere with diagnosis and monitoring of treatment.Recognition of these pitfalls and limitations can minimize their impact on image interpretation, and carefully applying the analyzed results and combining with pathologic grading and staging to clinical practice can contribute to the selection of an adequate treatment method to improve patient care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, China Medical University Hospital; No. 2, Yuh-Der Rd, Taichung 40447, Taiwan (R.O.C.); School of Medicine, China Medical University; No.91, Syueshih Rd, Taichung, 40402, Taiwan (R.O.C.).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus