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Baking sunflower hulls within an aluminum envelope in a common laboratory oven yields charcoal.

Arnal PM - MethodsX (2015)

Bottom Line: Charcoals have been widely used by scientist to research the removal of contaminants from water and air.One key feature of charcoal is that it keeps macropores from the parent material - though anisotropically contracted - and can even develop meso- and micropores.Those setups may not be affordable in research groups or educational institutions where the research of charcoals would be highly welcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Tecnología de Recursos Minerales y Cerámica (CETMIC), CIC - CONICET La Plata, Camino Centenario y 506, CC 49 (B1897ZCA), M.B. Gonnet, Province Buenos Aires, Argentina.

ABSTRACT
Charcoals have been widely used by scientist to research the removal of contaminants from water and air. One key feature of charcoal is that it keeps macropores from the parent material - though anisotropically contracted - and can even develop meso- and micropores. However, the controlled thermochemical conversion of biomass into charcoal at laboratory scale normally requires special setups which involve either vacuum or inert gas. Those setups may not be affordable in research groups or educational institutions where the research of charcoals would be highly welcome. In this work, I propose a simple and effective method to steer the thermochemical process that converts sunflower hulls (SFH) into charcoal with basic laboratory resources. The carbonization method: •Place SFH in an airtight aluminum envelope.•Thermally treat SFH within the envelope in a common laboratory oven.•Open the envelope to obtain the carbonized sunflower hulls.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean values of yields (●) obtained when thermally treating SFH within airtight envelopes made with aluminum foil (experimental group) and mean values of yields (○) obtained when SFH placed in an open box made with aluminum foil (control group). Samples were heated at 10 °C min−1 up to the final temperature, where the sample remained isothermally 2 h. Three independent experiments were performed at each experimental condition. Yields were calculated as mf/m0, where mf represents the mass of SFH before and m0 after the thermal treatment. All results were expressed as ± 3δ (see Appendix A).
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fig0005: Mean values of yields (●) obtained when thermally treating SFH within airtight envelopes made with aluminum foil (experimental group) and mean values of yields (○) obtained when SFH placed in an open box made with aluminum foil (control group). Samples were heated at 10 °C min−1 up to the final temperature, where the sample remained isothermally 2 h. Three independent experiments were performed at each experimental condition. Yields were calculated as mf/m0, where mf represents the mass of SFH before and m0 after the thermal treatment. All results were expressed as ± 3δ (see Appendix A).

Mentions: Three complementary indicators of a successful carbonization of biomass are yield of the process (see definition in caption of Fig. 1), elemental composition and appearance of the solid product.


Baking sunflower hulls within an aluminum envelope in a common laboratory oven yields charcoal.

Arnal PM - MethodsX (2015)

Mean values of yields (●) obtained when thermally treating SFH within airtight envelopes made with aluminum foil (experimental group) and mean values of yields (○) obtained when SFH placed in an open box made with aluminum foil (control group). Samples were heated at 10 °C min−1 up to the final temperature, where the sample remained isothermally 2 h. Three independent experiments were performed at each experimental condition. Yields were calculated as mf/m0, where mf represents the mass of SFH before and m0 after the thermal treatment. All results were expressed as ± 3δ (see Appendix A).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487715&req=5

fig0005: Mean values of yields (●) obtained when thermally treating SFH within airtight envelopes made with aluminum foil (experimental group) and mean values of yields (○) obtained when SFH placed in an open box made with aluminum foil (control group). Samples were heated at 10 °C min−1 up to the final temperature, where the sample remained isothermally 2 h. Three independent experiments were performed at each experimental condition. Yields were calculated as mf/m0, where mf represents the mass of SFH before and m0 after the thermal treatment. All results were expressed as ± 3δ (see Appendix A).
Mentions: Three complementary indicators of a successful carbonization of biomass are yield of the process (see definition in caption of Fig. 1), elemental composition and appearance of the solid product.

Bottom Line: Charcoals have been widely used by scientist to research the removal of contaminants from water and air.One key feature of charcoal is that it keeps macropores from the parent material - though anisotropically contracted - and can even develop meso- and micropores.Those setups may not be affordable in research groups or educational institutions where the research of charcoals would be highly welcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Tecnología de Recursos Minerales y Cerámica (CETMIC), CIC - CONICET La Plata, Camino Centenario y 506, CC 49 (B1897ZCA), M.B. Gonnet, Province Buenos Aires, Argentina.

ABSTRACT
Charcoals have been widely used by scientist to research the removal of contaminants from water and air. One key feature of charcoal is that it keeps macropores from the parent material - though anisotropically contracted - and can even develop meso- and micropores. However, the controlled thermochemical conversion of biomass into charcoal at laboratory scale normally requires special setups which involve either vacuum or inert gas. Those setups may not be affordable in research groups or educational institutions where the research of charcoals would be highly welcome. In this work, I propose a simple and effective method to steer the thermochemical process that converts sunflower hulls (SFH) into charcoal with basic laboratory resources. The carbonization method: •Place SFH in an airtight aluminum envelope.•Thermally treat SFH within the envelope in a common laboratory oven.•Open the envelope to obtain the carbonized sunflower hulls.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus