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A methodology for identification and control of electro-mechanical actuators.

Tutunji TA, Saleem A - MethodsX (2015)

Bottom Line: The described three-stage methodology provides the following practical contributions: •Establishes an easy-to-follow methodology for controller design of electro-mechanical actuators.•Combines off-line and on-line controller design for practical performance.•Modifies the HIL concept by using physical plants with computer control (rather than virtual plants with physical controllers).Simulated and experimental results for two case studies, induction motor and vehicle drive system, are presented in order to validate the proposed methodology.These results showed that electromechanical actuators can be identified and controlled using an easy-to-duplicate and flexible procedure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechatronics Engineering, Philadelphia University, Jordan.

ABSTRACT
Mechatronic systems are fully-integrated engineering systems that are composed of mechanical, electronic, and computer control sub-systems. These integrated systems use electro-mechanical actuators to cause the required motion. Therefore, the design of appropriate controllers for these actuators are an essential step in mechatronic system design. In this paper, a three-stage methodology for real-time identification and control of electro-mechanical actuator plants is presented, tested, and validated. First, identification models are constructed from experimental data to approximate the plants' response. Second, the identified model is used in a simulation environment for the purpose of designing a suitable controller. Finally, the designed controller is applied and tested on the real plant through Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) environment. The described three-stage methodology provides the following practical contributions: •Establishes an easy-to-follow methodology for controller design of electro-mechanical actuators.•Combines off-line and on-line controller design for practical performance.•Modifies the HIL concept by using physical plants with computer control (rather than virtual plants with physical controllers). Simulated and experimental results for two case studies, induction motor and vehicle drive system, are presented in order to validate the proposed methodology. These results showed that electromechanical actuators can be identified and controlled using an easy-to-duplicate and flexible procedure.

No MeSH data available.


(a) Online identification, (b) off-line controller design, (c) online control.
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fig0010: (a) Online identification, (b) off-line controller design, (c) online control.

Mentions: Identification is the process of building a dynamical mathematical model using measured data in a real-time environment [1]. The mathematical model built is the estimated transfer function of the identified system. In this stage, the actuator is connected to the computer through data acquisition card. A computer program using Matlab/Simulink is used to apply an impulse signal to the plant as shown in Fig. 2a. This in turn, activates the plant. For implementation purposes a pulse was used instead of an impulse where the period of the pulse was short enough to represent an ideal impulse but long enough to activate the actuator to its desired settling speed. The system response is then acquired and recorded back to the computer. The computer software uses these input/output data patterns to build a model by minimizing the error, between the model and plant.


A methodology for identification and control of electro-mechanical actuators.

Tutunji TA, Saleem A - MethodsX (2015)

(a) Online identification, (b) off-line controller design, (c) online control.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487713&req=5

fig0010: (a) Online identification, (b) off-line controller design, (c) online control.
Mentions: Identification is the process of building a dynamical mathematical model using measured data in a real-time environment [1]. The mathematical model built is the estimated transfer function of the identified system. In this stage, the actuator is connected to the computer through data acquisition card. A computer program using Matlab/Simulink is used to apply an impulse signal to the plant as shown in Fig. 2a. This in turn, activates the plant. For implementation purposes a pulse was used instead of an impulse where the period of the pulse was short enough to represent an ideal impulse but long enough to activate the actuator to its desired settling speed. The system response is then acquired and recorded back to the computer. The computer software uses these input/output data patterns to build a model by minimizing the error, between the model and plant.

Bottom Line: The described three-stage methodology provides the following practical contributions: •Establishes an easy-to-follow methodology for controller design of electro-mechanical actuators.•Combines off-line and on-line controller design for practical performance.•Modifies the HIL concept by using physical plants with computer control (rather than virtual plants with physical controllers).Simulated and experimental results for two case studies, induction motor and vehicle drive system, are presented in order to validate the proposed methodology.These results showed that electromechanical actuators can be identified and controlled using an easy-to-duplicate and flexible procedure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechatronics Engineering, Philadelphia University, Jordan.

ABSTRACT
Mechatronic systems are fully-integrated engineering systems that are composed of mechanical, electronic, and computer control sub-systems. These integrated systems use electro-mechanical actuators to cause the required motion. Therefore, the design of appropriate controllers for these actuators are an essential step in mechatronic system design. In this paper, a three-stage methodology for real-time identification and control of electro-mechanical actuator plants is presented, tested, and validated. First, identification models are constructed from experimental data to approximate the plants' response. Second, the identified model is used in a simulation environment for the purpose of designing a suitable controller. Finally, the designed controller is applied and tested on the real plant through Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) environment. The described three-stage methodology provides the following practical contributions: •Establishes an easy-to-follow methodology for controller design of electro-mechanical actuators.•Combines off-line and on-line controller design for practical performance.•Modifies the HIL concept by using physical plants with computer control (rather than virtual plants with physical controllers). Simulated and experimental results for two case studies, induction motor and vehicle drive system, are presented in order to validate the proposed methodology. These results showed that electromechanical actuators can be identified and controlled using an easy-to-duplicate and flexible procedure.

No MeSH data available.