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Turmeric and black pepper spices decrease lipid peroxidation in meat patties during cooking.

Zhang Y, Henning SM, Lee RP, Huang J, Zerlin A, Li Z, Heber D - Int J Food Sci Nutr (2015)

Bottom Line: The addition of black pepper to turmeric significantly decreased the lipid peroxidation in hamburger meat.When investigating the antioxidant activity of the main chemical markers, we determined that piperine did not exhibit any antioxidant activity.Therefore, we conclude that other black pepper ingredients are responsible for the increased antioxidant activity of combining black pepper with turmeric powder.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Human Nutrition, University of California , Los Angeles, CA , USA.

ABSTRACT
Spices are rich in natural antioxidants and have been shown to be potent inhibitors of lipid peroxidation during cooking of meat. Turmeric contains unique conjugated curcuminoids with strong antioxidant activity. Piperine, one of the main constituents of black pepper, is known to increase the bioavailability of curcuminoids in mouse and human studies when consumed with turmeric. We investigated whether adding black pepper to turmeric powder may further inhibit lipid peroxidation when added to meat patties prior to cooking. The addition of black pepper to turmeric significantly decreased the lipid peroxidation in hamburger meat. When investigating the antioxidant activity of the main chemical markers, we determined that piperine did not exhibit any antioxidant activity. Therefore, we conclude that other black pepper ingredients are responsible for the increased antioxidant activity of combining black pepper with turmeric powder.

No MeSH data available.


Structures of curcuminoids and piperine.
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Figure 0001: Structures of curcuminoids and piperine.

Mentions: The spice mixture used in our previous experiment contained a wide variety of chemical compounds with strong antioxidant activity (Li et al., 2010). In a preliminary experiment we determined that among the eight spices in the mixture, on an equal weight basis, turmeric exhibited the strongest inhibition of lipid peroxidation. Turmeric is the dried rhizome powder of Curcuma longa, a perennial herb of the Zingiberaceae family. Curcumin is the main yellow pigment of turmeric, a popular spice, which is widely used as a food colorant (Govindarajan, 1980). The main components of turmeric powder are curcuminoids with strong antioxidant activity (Ruby et al., 1995) and have received attention as promising components of designer foods for their health-promoting benefits (Kelloff et al., 1996). Curcuminoids have a unique conjugated structure including methoxylated phenols and an enol form of β-diketone (Figure 1). The structure of curcuminoids confers oxygen radical-trapping capacity as a chain-breaking antioxidant. Limited bioavailability decreases the potential of curcumin in the prevention of chronic disease (Metzler et al., 2013). It has been demonstrated that combining curcumin with piperine from black pepper increased the bioavailability of curcuminoids in animal and human studies (Pawar et al., 2012; Sehgal et al., 2011, 2012). This effect in vivo was mainly explained through the ability of piperine to inhibit hepatic and intestinal glucuronidation of curcuminoids and inhibition of release of curcuminoid into the intestine leading to an increase in bioavailability (Berginc et al., 2012). However, we were interested to determine whether other chemical interactions between turmeric and black pepper may increase the availability and antioxidant activity in our in vitro hamburger model system.Figure 1.


Turmeric and black pepper spices decrease lipid peroxidation in meat patties during cooking.

Zhang Y, Henning SM, Lee RP, Huang J, Zerlin A, Li Z, Heber D - Int J Food Sci Nutr (2015)

Structures of curcuminoids and piperine.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487614&req=5

Figure 0001: Structures of curcuminoids and piperine.
Mentions: The spice mixture used in our previous experiment contained a wide variety of chemical compounds with strong antioxidant activity (Li et al., 2010). In a preliminary experiment we determined that among the eight spices in the mixture, on an equal weight basis, turmeric exhibited the strongest inhibition of lipid peroxidation. Turmeric is the dried rhizome powder of Curcuma longa, a perennial herb of the Zingiberaceae family. Curcumin is the main yellow pigment of turmeric, a popular spice, which is widely used as a food colorant (Govindarajan, 1980). The main components of turmeric powder are curcuminoids with strong antioxidant activity (Ruby et al., 1995) and have received attention as promising components of designer foods for their health-promoting benefits (Kelloff et al., 1996). Curcuminoids have a unique conjugated structure including methoxylated phenols and an enol form of β-diketone (Figure 1). The structure of curcuminoids confers oxygen radical-trapping capacity as a chain-breaking antioxidant. Limited bioavailability decreases the potential of curcumin in the prevention of chronic disease (Metzler et al., 2013). It has been demonstrated that combining curcumin with piperine from black pepper increased the bioavailability of curcuminoids in animal and human studies (Pawar et al., 2012; Sehgal et al., 2011, 2012). This effect in vivo was mainly explained through the ability of piperine to inhibit hepatic and intestinal glucuronidation of curcuminoids and inhibition of release of curcuminoid into the intestine leading to an increase in bioavailability (Berginc et al., 2012). However, we were interested to determine whether other chemical interactions between turmeric and black pepper may increase the availability and antioxidant activity in our in vitro hamburger model system.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: The addition of black pepper to turmeric significantly decreased the lipid peroxidation in hamburger meat.When investigating the antioxidant activity of the main chemical markers, we determined that piperine did not exhibit any antioxidant activity.Therefore, we conclude that other black pepper ingredients are responsible for the increased antioxidant activity of combining black pepper with turmeric powder.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Human Nutrition, University of California , Los Angeles, CA , USA.

ABSTRACT
Spices are rich in natural antioxidants and have been shown to be potent inhibitors of lipid peroxidation during cooking of meat. Turmeric contains unique conjugated curcuminoids with strong antioxidant activity. Piperine, one of the main constituents of black pepper, is known to increase the bioavailability of curcuminoids in mouse and human studies when consumed with turmeric. We investigated whether adding black pepper to turmeric powder may further inhibit lipid peroxidation when added to meat patties prior to cooking. The addition of black pepper to turmeric significantly decreased the lipid peroxidation in hamburger meat. When investigating the antioxidant activity of the main chemical markers, we determined that piperine did not exhibit any antioxidant activity. Therefore, we conclude that other black pepper ingredients are responsible for the increased antioxidant activity of combining black pepper with turmeric powder.

No MeSH data available.