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The role of verbal and pictorial information in multimodal incidental acquisition of foreign language vocabulary.

Bisson MJ, van Heuven WJ, Conklin K, Tunney RJ - Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) (2014)

Bottom Line: Results showed higher accuracy scores in the explicit learning task for FL words presented with meaning during incidental learning, whether written meaning or both written meaning and picture, than for FL words presented auditorily only.However, participants recalled significantly more FL words after a week delay if they had been presented with a picture during incidental learning.In addition, the time spent looking at the pictures during incidental learning significantly predicted recognition and recall scores one week later.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a School of Psychology , Nottingham University , Nottingham , UK.

ABSTRACT
This study used eye tracking to investigate the allocation of attention to multimodal stimuli during an incidental learning situation, as well as its impact on subsequent explicit learning. Participants were exposed to foreign language (FL) auditory words on their own, in conjunction with written native language (NL) translations, or with both written NL translations and pictures. Incidental acquisition of FL words was assessed the following day through an explicit learning task where participants learned to recognize translation equivalents, as well as one week later through recall and translation recognition tests. Results showed higher accuracy scores in the explicit learning task for FL words presented with meaning during incidental learning, whether written meaning or both written meaning and picture, than for FL words presented auditorily only. However, participants recalled significantly more FL words after a week delay if they had been presented with a picture during incidental learning. In addition, the time spent looking at the pictures during incidental learning significantly predicted recognition and recall scores one week later. Overall, results demonstrated the impact of exposure to multimodal stimuli on subsequent explicit learning, as well as the important role that pictorial information can play in incidental vocabulary acquisition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Example of the three types of word presentations during the incidental learning phase (letter-search task). FL = foreign language; NL = native language.
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Figure 0001: Example of the three types of word presentations during the incidental learning phase (letter-search task). FL = foreign language; NL = native language.

Mentions: In order to address this question, a similar letter-search task was used to provide an incidental learning situation as in Bisson et al. (2013, 2014b). However, the type of information presented for each FL word varied within participants. Participants were presented with three different types of trials: auditory FL word forms only, auditory FL word forms with written NL translations, and both auditory FL word forms and written NL translations presented with simple line drawings depicting the meaning of the words (see Figure 1). In Bisson et al. (2013, 2014b), incidental vocabulary acquisition was assessed through an explicit learning task using translation recognition with feedback. In the present study, the same task was used to assess learning the day following the incidental learning phase. Participants also returned one week later to complete a recall test and a translation recognition test (without feedback). It was predicted that having access to all three types of information (auditory FL word forms, written NL translations, and pictures) would be beneficial for learning as assessed by accuracy scores on the explicit learning task the next day, as well as on the recall and recognition tests one week later. Furthermore, the accuracy scores on both word conditions presented with meaning, whether written translations or both written translations and pictures, should be higher than those for the words presented with auditory FL word forms only. Furthermore, a control group who did not take part in the incidental learning phase completed both the explicit learning task and the delayed recall and recognition tests. It was predicted that the experimental group would outperform the control group for words presented with meaning in the incidental learning phase.Figure 1


The role of verbal and pictorial information in multimodal incidental acquisition of foreign language vocabulary.

Bisson MJ, van Heuven WJ, Conklin K, Tunney RJ - Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) (2014)

Example of the three types of word presentations during the incidental learning phase (letter-search task). FL = foreign language; NL = native language.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487591&req=5

Figure 0001: Example of the three types of word presentations during the incidental learning phase (letter-search task). FL = foreign language; NL = native language.
Mentions: In order to address this question, a similar letter-search task was used to provide an incidental learning situation as in Bisson et al. (2013, 2014b). However, the type of information presented for each FL word varied within participants. Participants were presented with three different types of trials: auditory FL word forms only, auditory FL word forms with written NL translations, and both auditory FL word forms and written NL translations presented with simple line drawings depicting the meaning of the words (see Figure 1). In Bisson et al. (2013, 2014b), incidental vocabulary acquisition was assessed through an explicit learning task using translation recognition with feedback. In the present study, the same task was used to assess learning the day following the incidental learning phase. Participants also returned one week later to complete a recall test and a translation recognition test (without feedback). It was predicted that having access to all three types of information (auditory FL word forms, written NL translations, and pictures) would be beneficial for learning as assessed by accuracy scores on the explicit learning task the next day, as well as on the recall and recognition tests one week later. Furthermore, the accuracy scores on both word conditions presented with meaning, whether written translations or both written translations and pictures, should be higher than those for the words presented with auditory FL word forms only. Furthermore, a control group who did not take part in the incidental learning phase completed both the explicit learning task and the delayed recall and recognition tests. It was predicted that the experimental group would outperform the control group for words presented with meaning in the incidental learning phase.Figure 1

Bottom Line: Results showed higher accuracy scores in the explicit learning task for FL words presented with meaning during incidental learning, whether written meaning or both written meaning and picture, than for FL words presented auditorily only.However, participants recalled significantly more FL words after a week delay if they had been presented with a picture during incidental learning.In addition, the time spent looking at the pictures during incidental learning significantly predicted recognition and recall scores one week later.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a School of Psychology , Nottingham University , Nottingham , UK.

ABSTRACT
This study used eye tracking to investigate the allocation of attention to multimodal stimuli during an incidental learning situation, as well as its impact on subsequent explicit learning. Participants were exposed to foreign language (FL) auditory words on their own, in conjunction with written native language (NL) translations, or with both written NL translations and pictures. Incidental acquisition of FL words was assessed the following day through an explicit learning task where participants learned to recognize translation equivalents, as well as one week later through recall and translation recognition tests. Results showed higher accuracy scores in the explicit learning task for FL words presented with meaning during incidental learning, whether written meaning or both written meaning and picture, than for FL words presented auditorily only. However, participants recalled significantly more FL words after a week delay if they had been presented with a picture during incidental learning. In addition, the time spent looking at the pictures during incidental learning significantly predicted recognition and recall scores one week later. Overall, results demonstrated the impact of exposure to multimodal stimuli on subsequent explicit learning, as well as the important role that pictorial information can play in incidental vocabulary acquisition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus