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Sexual onset and contraceptive use among adolescents from poor neighbourhoods in Managua, Nicaragua.

Decat P, De Meyer S, Jaruseviciene L, Orozco M, Ibarra M, Segura Z, Medina J, Vega B, Michielsen K, Temmerman M, Degomme O - Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care (2014)

Bottom Line: Having a partner and feeling comfortable talking about sexuality with the partner were associated with hormonal contraception.Our data identified associates of adolescents' sexual behaviour related to personal characteristics (sex and alcohol use), to the interaction with significant others (parents, partners, peers) and to the environment (housing condition, religion).We interpreted those associates within the context of the rapidly changing society and the recently implemented health system reform in Nicaragua.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: * International Centre for Reproductive Health (ICRH), Ghent University , Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: The prevalence of teenage pregnancies in Nicaragua is the highest in Latin-America. This study aimed to gain insight into factors which determine the sexual behaviours concerned.

Methods: From July until August 2011, a door-to-door survey was conducted among adolescents living in randomly selected poor neighbourhoods of Managua. Logistic regression was used to analyse factors related to sexual onset and contraceptive use.

Results: Data from 2803 adolescents were analysed. Of the 475 and 299 sexually active boys and girls, 43% and 54%, respectively, reported contraceptive use. Sexual onset was positively related to increasing age, male sex, alcohol consumption and not living with the parents. Catholic boys and boys never feeling peer pressure to have sexual intercourse were more likely to report consistent condom use. Having a partner and feeling comfortable talking about sexuality with the partner were associated with hormonal contraception.

Conclusions: Our data identified associates of adolescents' sexual behaviour related to personal characteristics (sex and alcohol use), to the interaction with significant others (parents, partners, peers) and to the environment (housing condition, religion). We interpreted those associates within the context of the rapidly changing society and the recently implemented health system reform in Nicaragua.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentages of girls who were pregnant or had ever been pregnant (the line represents the mean value).
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Figure 0001: Percentages of girls who were pregnant or had ever been pregnant (the line represents the mean value).

Mentions: Differences between girls and boys were found with respect to whether or not the adolescent was living with the parents (p = 0.047). More boys than girls stated they were insufficiently informed on sexuality-related issues (p < 0.001). Girls more frequently reported having visited a healthcare provider (HCP) to obtain information on sexuality issues. On the other hand, more girls (162 out of 504) than boys (117 out of 567) said it was not possible to discuss sexuality with their partner (p < 0.001). Among the girls 9% (128 out of 1445) were or had ever been pregnant (Figure 1).


Sexual onset and contraceptive use among adolescents from poor neighbourhoods in Managua, Nicaragua.

Decat P, De Meyer S, Jaruseviciene L, Orozco M, Ibarra M, Segura Z, Medina J, Vega B, Michielsen K, Temmerman M, Degomme O - Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care (2014)

Percentages of girls who were pregnant or had ever been pregnant (the line represents the mean value).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487549&req=5

Figure 0001: Percentages of girls who were pregnant or had ever been pregnant (the line represents the mean value).
Mentions: Differences between girls and boys were found with respect to whether or not the adolescent was living with the parents (p = 0.047). More boys than girls stated they were insufficiently informed on sexuality-related issues (p < 0.001). Girls more frequently reported having visited a healthcare provider (HCP) to obtain information on sexuality issues. On the other hand, more girls (162 out of 504) than boys (117 out of 567) said it was not possible to discuss sexuality with their partner (p < 0.001). Among the girls 9% (128 out of 1445) were or had ever been pregnant (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Having a partner and feeling comfortable talking about sexuality with the partner were associated with hormonal contraception.Our data identified associates of adolescents' sexual behaviour related to personal characteristics (sex and alcohol use), to the interaction with significant others (parents, partners, peers) and to the environment (housing condition, religion).We interpreted those associates within the context of the rapidly changing society and the recently implemented health system reform in Nicaragua.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: * International Centre for Reproductive Health (ICRH), Ghent University , Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: The prevalence of teenage pregnancies in Nicaragua is the highest in Latin-America. This study aimed to gain insight into factors which determine the sexual behaviours concerned.

Methods: From July until August 2011, a door-to-door survey was conducted among adolescents living in randomly selected poor neighbourhoods of Managua. Logistic regression was used to analyse factors related to sexual onset and contraceptive use.

Results: Data from 2803 adolescents were analysed. Of the 475 and 299 sexually active boys and girls, 43% and 54%, respectively, reported contraceptive use. Sexual onset was positively related to increasing age, male sex, alcohol consumption and not living with the parents. Catholic boys and boys never feeling peer pressure to have sexual intercourse were more likely to report consistent condom use. Having a partner and feeling comfortable talking about sexuality with the partner were associated with hormonal contraception.

Conclusions: Our data identified associates of adolescents' sexual behaviour related to personal characteristics (sex and alcohol use), to the interaction with significant others (parents, partners, peers) and to the environment (housing condition, religion). We interpreted those associates within the context of the rapidly changing society and the recently implemented health system reform in Nicaragua.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus