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The dormant blood microbiome in chronic, inflammatory diseases.

Potgieter M, Bester J, Kell DB, Pretorius E - FEMS Microbiol. Rev. (2015)

Bottom Line: It is overcome by improved culturing methods, and we asked how common this would be in blood.Another source is microbes translocated from the oral cavity. 'Dysbiosis' is also used to describe translocation of cells into blood or other tissues.To avoid ambiguity, we here use the term 'atopobiosis' for microbes that appear in places other than their normal location.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Arcadia 0007, South Africa.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

TEM confirming the presence of bacteria inside erythrocytes of (A and B) AD, (C and D) PD. (Additional micrographs from sample used in Lipinski and Pretorius (2013) and Pretorius et al. (2014a). Arrows in each micrograph show the presence of cellular inclusions, without visible membranes. Inclusions are not typically noted in erythrocytes. We suggest that these inclusions are bacteria, possibly as L-forms. Scale bar = 1 μm (A, C, D); 200 nm (D).
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fig7: TEM confirming the presence of bacteria inside erythrocytes of (A and B) AD, (C and D) PD. (Additional micrographs from sample used in Lipinski and Pretorius (2013) and Pretorius et al. (2014a). Arrows in each micrograph show the presence of cellular inclusions, without visible membranes. Inclusions are not typically noted in erythrocytes. We suggest that these inclusions are bacteria, possibly as L-forms. Scale bar = 1 μm (A, C, D); 200 nm (D).

Mentions: TEM analysis of the samples from Lipinski and Pretorius (2013) and Pretorius et al. (2014a) showed the presence inside RBCs of cells that appeared to be microbial in nature (unpublished data). These internalized cells further provide evidence for a sustained presence of such a blood microbiota (and one hardly explained by contamination) (see Fig. 7A and B: AD and C and D: PD). Bacteria are shown with arrows in the micrographs. No bacterial membrane was noted; therefore, the bacteria may be L-forms. There seems to be bacterial species selectivity for a given disease, as our preliminary observations suggest a prevalence for bacillus-type bacteria in AD, but both coccus- and bacillus-shaped bacteria in PD patients.


The dormant blood microbiome in chronic, inflammatory diseases.

Potgieter M, Bester J, Kell DB, Pretorius E - FEMS Microbiol. Rev. (2015)

TEM confirming the presence of bacteria inside erythrocytes of (A and B) AD, (C and D) PD. (Additional micrographs from sample used in Lipinski and Pretorius (2013) and Pretorius et al. (2014a). Arrows in each micrograph show the presence of cellular inclusions, without visible membranes. Inclusions are not typically noted in erythrocytes. We suggest that these inclusions are bacteria, possibly as L-forms. Scale bar = 1 μm (A, C, D); 200 nm (D).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487407&req=5

fig7: TEM confirming the presence of bacteria inside erythrocytes of (A and B) AD, (C and D) PD. (Additional micrographs from sample used in Lipinski and Pretorius (2013) and Pretorius et al. (2014a). Arrows in each micrograph show the presence of cellular inclusions, without visible membranes. Inclusions are not typically noted in erythrocytes. We suggest that these inclusions are bacteria, possibly as L-forms. Scale bar = 1 μm (A, C, D); 200 nm (D).
Mentions: TEM analysis of the samples from Lipinski and Pretorius (2013) and Pretorius et al. (2014a) showed the presence inside RBCs of cells that appeared to be microbial in nature (unpublished data). These internalized cells further provide evidence for a sustained presence of such a blood microbiota (and one hardly explained by contamination) (see Fig. 7A and B: AD and C and D: PD). Bacteria are shown with arrows in the micrographs. No bacterial membrane was noted; therefore, the bacteria may be L-forms. There seems to be bacterial species selectivity for a given disease, as our preliminary observations suggest a prevalence for bacillus-type bacteria in AD, but both coccus- and bacillus-shaped bacteria in PD patients.

Bottom Line: It is overcome by improved culturing methods, and we asked how common this would be in blood.Another source is microbes translocated from the oral cavity. 'Dysbiosis' is also used to describe translocation of cells into blood or other tissues.To avoid ambiguity, we here use the term 'atopobiosis' for microbes that appear in places other than their normal location.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Arcadia 0007, South Africa.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus