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Physiological basis of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation in patients with lung or heart disease.

Louvaris Z, Vogiatzis I - Breathe (Sheff) (2015)

Bottom Line: In turn, poor daily physical activity is commonly associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality.However, benefits gained from participation in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes are regressing soon after the completion of these programmes.A potential solution to the underutilisation of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation is the implementation of tele-rehabilitation interventions at home using information and communications technologies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Physical Education and Sports Sciences, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.

ABSTRACT

Educational aims: To illustrate the common mechanisms limiting exercise tolerance in patients with chronic lung and heart diseaseTo highlight the impact of lung and heart disease on daily physical activity levelsTo outline the effects of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation on functional capacity in patients with chronic lung and heart diseaseTo discuss an innovative tele-rehabilitation intervention using information and communications technologies to improve functional capacity in patients with chronic lung and heart disease.

Summary: Shortness of breath associated with cardiorespiratory abnormalities and peripheral muscle discomfort are the major factors that limit exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and those with congestive heart failure (CHF). Both of these symptoms negatively impact on patients' daily physical activity levels. In turn, poor daily physical activity is commonly associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality. Cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes partially reverse muscle weakness and dysfunction and increase functional capacity in both COPD and CHF. However, benefits gained from participation in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes are regressing soon after the completion of these programmes. Moreover, several barriers limit access and uptake of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes by eligible patients. A potential solution to the underutilisation of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation is the implementation of tele-rehabilitation interventions at home using information and communications technologies. Thus, tele-rehabilitation may be useful to encourage and educate patients with COPD or CHF on how best to maintain and/or further enhance daily physical activity levels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Example of the basic components of tele-coaching programme.
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Figure 3: Example of the basic components of tele-coaching programme.

Mentions: Such an interactive remote physical training intervention is currently under investigation in patients with COPD aiming at enhancing and maintaining daily physical activity levels (www.proactivecopd.com/about/news/telecoaching-to-enhance-physical-activity/). A 3-month coaching intervention including a step counter, an exercise booklet, an application installed on a smartphone device, text messages and telephone contact with investigators when necessary is underway. An example of the basic components is shown on figure 3.FigureĀ 3


Physiological basis of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation in patients with lung or heart disease.

Louvaris Z, Vogiatzis I - Breathe (Sheff) (2015)

Example of the basic components of tele-coaching programme.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487369&req=5

Figure 3: Example of the basic components of tele-coaching programme.
Mentions: Such an interactive remote physical training intervention is currently under investigation in patients with COPD aiming at enhancing and maintaining daily physical activity levels (www.proactivecopd.com/about/news/telecoaching-to-enhance-physical-activity/). A 3-month coaching intervention including a step counter, an exercise booklet, an application installed on a smartphone device, text messages and telephone contact with investigators when necessary is underway. An example of the basic components is shown on figure 3.FigureĀ 3

Bottom Line: In turn, poor daily physical activity is commonly associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality.However, benefits gained from participation in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes are regressing soon after the completion of these programmes.A potential solution to the underutilisation of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation is the implementation of tele-rehabilitation interventions at home using information and communications technologies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Physical Education and Sports Sciences, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.

ABSTRACT

Educational aims: To illustrate the common mechanisms limiting exercise tolerance in patients with chronic lung and heart diseaseTo highlight the impact of lung and heart disease on daily physical activity levelsTo outline the effects of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation on functional capacity in patients with chronic lung and heart diseaseTo discuss an innovative tele-rehabilitation intervention using information and communications technologies to improve functional capacity in patients with chronic lung and heart disease.

Summary: Shortness of breath associated with cardiorespiratory abnormalities and peripheral muscle discomfort are the major factors that limit exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and those with congestive heart failure (CHF). Both of these symptoms negatively impact on patients' daily physical activity levels. In turn, poor daily physical activity is commonly associated with increased rates of morbidity and mortality. Cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes partially reverse muscle weakness and dysfunction and increase functional capacity in both COPD and CHF. However, benefits gained from participation in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes are regressing soon after the completion of these programmes. Moreover, several barriers limit access and uptake of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programmes by eligible patients. A potential solution to the underutilisation of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation is the implementation of tele-rehabilitation interventions at home using information and communications technologies. Thus, tele-rehabilitation may be useful to encourage and educate patients with COPD or CHF on how best to maintain and/or further enhance daily physical activity levels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus