Limits...
Retinitis Pigmentosa with EYS Mutations Is the Most Prevalent Inherited Retinal Dystrophy in Japanese Populations.

Arai Y, Maeda A, Hirami Y, Ishigami C, Kosugi S, Mandai M, Kurimoto Y, Takahashi M - J Ophthalmol (2015)

Bottom Line: We found 205 sequence variants in 159 of 349 probands with an identification rate of 45.6%.This study found 43 novel sequence variants.EYS mutations are the most prevalent among Japanese patients with IRD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory for Retinal Regeneration, Center for Developmental Biology, RIKEN, Kobe 650-0047, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to gain information about disease prevalence and to identify the responsible genes for inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD) in Japanese populations. Clinical and molecular evaluations were performed on 349 patients with IRD. For segregation analyses, 63 of their family members were employed. Bioinformatics data from 1,208 Japanese individuals were used as controls. Molecular diagnosis was obtained by direct sequencing in a stepwise fashion utilizing one or two panels of 15 and 27 genes for retinitis pigmentosa patients. If a specific clinical diagnosis was suspected, direct sequencing of disease-specific genes, that is, ABCA4 for Stargardt disease, was conducted. Limited availability of intrafamily information and decreasing family size hampered identifying inherited patterns. Differential disease profiles with lower prevalence of Stargardt disease from European and North American populations were obtained. We found 205 sequence variants in 159 of 349 probands with an identification rate of 45.6%. This study found 43 novel sequence variants. In silico analysis suggests that 20 of 25 novel missense variants are pathogenic. EYS mutations had the highest prevalence at 23.5%. c.4957_4958insA and c.8868C>A were the two major EYS mutations identified in this cohort. EYS mutations are the most prevalent among Japanese patients with IRD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Retinal dystrophies included in this study. Clinical diagnosis of each retinal disease is shown. Nonsyndromic RP was found in 313 of 349 cases at the rate of 89.6%. We revised the clinical diagnosis in one case after genotyping: the patient diagnosed with cone dystrophy was revised to autosomal recessive enhanced S-cone syndrome (ESC) due to compound heterozygous NR2E3 mutations: c.419A>G and c.488T>C.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487330&req=5

fig2: Retinal dystrophies included in this study. Clinical diagnosis of each retinal disease is shown. Nonsyndromic RP was found in 313 of 349 cases at the rate of 89.6%. We revised the clinical diagnosis in one case after genotyping: the patient diagnosed with cone dystrophy was revised to autosomal recessive enhanced S-cone syndrome (ESC) due to compound heterozygous NR2E3 mutations: c.419A>G and c.488T>C.

Mentions: The summary of clinical diagnoses in our cohort is shown in Figure 2, and 313 of 349 (89.6%) patients were diagnosed as nonsyndromic RP. The fraction of Stargardt disease patients in our cohort was 1.2%. The estimated prevalence of Stargardt disease is 1 in 8,000–10,000 individulas in North America [6] and that of RP is 1 in 3,000-4,000 individulas [2]. The estimated prevalence of RP in Japan is also 1 of 3,000-4,000 individulas; however, our data indicates a higher rate of RP and a lower prevalence of Stargardt disease in Japanese IRD populations. Additionally choroideremia, in which we identified 5 genetically unrelated patients in this study, has a reported prevalence of 1 in 50,000–100,000 individulas in North America (http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/choroideremia). Usher syndrome was found in 5 unrelated patients and was the only syndromic disease identified. Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is known to be more common in people with East Asian ancestry [7], and 11 unrelated BCD patients were identified in this cohort. Although the high RP and low Stargardt disease prevalence might be associated with patient referral bias to our clinic, the RP/Genetic Counseling Clinic, the current study clearly demonstrates differential disease profiles between racial backgrounds. We revised the clinical diagnosis in one case after genotyping: the patient diagnosed with cone dystrophy was revised to autosomal recessive enhanced S-cone syndrome (ESC) due to compound heterozygous NR2E3 mutations: c.419A>G and c.488T>C.


Retinitis Pigmentosa with EYS Mutations Is the Most Prevalent Inherited Retinal Dystrophy in Japanese Populations.

Arai Y, Maeda A, Hirami Y, Ishigami C, Kosugi S, Mandai M, Kurimoto Y, Takahashi M - J Ophthalmol (2015)

Retinal dystrophies included in this study. Clinical diagnosis of each retinal disease is shown. Nonsyndromic RP was found in 313 of 349 cases at the rate of 89.6%. We revised the clinical diagnosis in one case after genotyping: the patient diagnosed with cone dystrophy was revised to autosomal recessive enhanced S-cone syndrome (ESC) due to compound heterozygous NR2E3 mutations: c.419A>G and c.488T>C.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487330&req=5

fig2: Retinal dystrophies included in this study. Clinical diagnosis of each retinal disease is shown. Nonsyndromic RP was found in 313 of 349 cases at the rate of 89.6%. We revised the clinical diagnosis in one case after genotyping: the patient diagnosed with cone dystrophy was revised to autosomal recessive enhanced S-cone syndrome (ESC) due to compound heterozygous NR2E3 mutations: c.419A>G and c.488T>C.
Mentions: The summary of clinical diagnoses in our cohort is shown in Figure 2, and 313 of 349 (89.6%) patients were diagnosed as nonsyndromic RP. The fraction of Stargardt disease patients in our cohort was 1.2%. The estimated prevalence of Stargardt disease is 1 in 8,000–10,000 individulas in North America [6] and that of RP is 1 in 3,000-4,000 individulas [2]. The estimated prevalence of RP in Japan is also 1 of 3,000-4,000 individulas; however, our data indicates a higher rate of RP and a lower prevalence of Stargardt disease in Japanese IRD populations. Additionally choroideremia, in which we identified 5 genetically unrelated patients in this study, has a reported prevalence of 1 in 50,000–100,000 individulas in North America (http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/choroideremia). Usher syndrome was found in 5 unrelated patients and was the only syndromic disease identified. Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is known to be more common in people with East Asian ancestry [7], and 11 unrelated BCD patients were identified in this cohort. Although the high RP and low Stargardt disease prevalence might be associated with patient referral bias to our clinic, the RP/Genetic Counseling Clinic, the current study clearly demonstrates differential disease profiles between racial backgrounds. We revised the clinical diagnosis in one case after genotyping: the patient diagnosed with cone dystrophy was revised to autosomal recessive enhanced S-cone syndrome (ESC) due to compound heterozygous NR2E3 mutations: c.419A>G and c.488T>C.

Bottom Line: We found 205 sequence variants in 159 of 349 probands with an identification rate of 45.6%.This study found 43 novel sequence variants.EYS mutations are the most prevalent among Japanese patients with IRD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory for Retinal Regeneration, Center for Developmental Biology, RIKEN, Kobe 650-0047, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to gain information about disease prevalence and to identify the responsible genes for inherited retinal dystrophies (IRD) in Japanese populations. Clinical and molecular evaluations were performed on 349 patients with IRD. For segregation analyses, 63 of their family members were employed. Bioinformatics data from 1,208 Japanese individuals were used as controls. Molecular diagnosis was obtained by direct sequencing in a stepwise fashion utilizing one or two panels of 15 and 27 genes for retinitis pigmentosa patients. If a specific clinical diagnosis was suspected, direct sequencing of disease-specific genes, that is, ABCA4 for Stargardt disease, was conducted. Limited availability of intrafamily information and decreasing family size hampered identifying inherited patterns. Differential disease profiles with lower prevalence of Stargardt disease from European and North American populations were obtained. We found 205 sequence variants in 159 of 349 probands with an identification rate of 45.6%. This study found 43 novel sequence variants. In silico analysis suggests that 20 of 25 novel missense variants are pathogenic. EYS mutations had the highest prevalence at 23.5%. c.4957_4958insA and c.8868C>A were the two major EYS mutations identified in this cohort. EYS mutations are the most prevalent among Japanese patients with IRD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus