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Ambulance Design Survey 2011: A Summary Report.

Lee YT, Kibira D, Feeney AB, Marshall J - J Res Natl Inst Stand Technol (2013)

Bottom Line: Current ambulance designs are ergonomically inefficient and often times unsafe for practical treatment response to medical emergencies.This paper presents an analysis of practitioners' concerns, needs, and requirements for improved designs elicited through the web-based survey of ambulance design, held by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.This paper also introduces the survey, analyzes the survey results, and discusses recommendations for future ambulance patient compartments design.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899.

ABSTRACT
Current ambulance designs are ergonomically inefficient and often times unsafe for practical treatment response to medical emergencies. Thus, the patient compartment of a moving ambulance is a hazardous working environment. As a consequence, emergency medical services (EMS) workers suffer fatalities and injuries that far exceed those of the average work place in the United States. To reduce injury and mortality rates in ambulances, the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate has teamed with the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and BMT Designers & Planners in a joint project to produce science-based ambulance patient compartment design standards. This project will develop new crash-safety design standards and improved user-design interface guidance for patient compartments that are safer for EMS personnel and patients, and facilitate improved patient care. The project team has been working with practitioners, EMS workers' organizations, and manufacturers to solicit needs and requirements to address related issues. This paper presents an analysis of practitioners' concerns, needs, and requirements for improved designs elicited through the web-based survey of ambulance design, held by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. This paper also introduces the survey, analyzes the survey results, and discusses recommendations for future ambulance patient compartments design.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Current seating arrangement (left), seating orientation preference –both bucket and bench seat (center), and CPR seat recommendation (right).
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f2-jres.118.019: Current seating arrangement (left), seating orientation preference –both bucket and bench seat (center), and CPR seat recommendation (right).

Mentions: The seating category concerns the extent to which the patient compartment will enable EMT workers to provide effective and ergonomic work from the seat in the patient compartment. The survey responses showed that the bench seat is the most commonly used seat type and side-facing is the most preferred orientation. In addition, 80 % of respondents would recommend providing a CPR seat in the patient compartment. The statistical data are summarized in Fig. 2. The results indicate that current seating arrangements are not very conducive to treating patients, nor do they provide sufficient access to equipment or supplies. When asked whether location and height of ambulance seating is adequate to providing access to patient or equipment/supplies, the satisfaction ratings were 61 and 46 respectively. This means that the respondents are slightly more satisfied with the location of the seat than the height. The satisfaction rating for seating and performing patient care is 55. This rating indicates that EMS workers have significant concerns about seating.


Ambulance Design Survey 2011: A Summary Report.

Lee YT, Kibira D, Feeney AB, Marshall J - J Res Natl Inst Stand Technol (2013)

Current seating arrangement (left), seating orientation preference –both bucket and bench seat (center), and CPR seat recommendation (right).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487317&req=5

f2-jres.118.019: Current seating arrangement (left), seating orientation preference –both bucket and bench seat (center), and CPR seat recommendation (right).
Mentions: The seating category concerns the extent to which the patient compartment will enable EMT workers to provide effective and ergonomic work from the seat in the patient compartment. The survey responses showed that the bench seat is the most commonly used seat type and side-facing is the most preferred orientation. In addition, 80 % of respondents would recommend providing a CPR seat in the patient compartment. The statistical data are summarized in Fig. 2. The results indicate that current seating arrangements are not very conducive to treating patients, nor do they provide sufficient access to equipment or supplies. When asked whether location and height of ambulance seating is adequate to providing access to patient or equipment/supplies, the satisfaction ratings were 61 and 46 respectively. This means that the respondents are slightly more satisfied with the location of the seat than the height. The satisfaction rating for seating and performing patient care is 55. This rating indicates that EMS workers have significant concerns about seating.

Bottom Line: Current ambulance designs are ergonomically inefficient and often times unsafe for practical treatment response to medical emergencies.This paper presents an analysis of practitioners' concerns, needs, and requirements for improved designs elicited through the web-based survey of ambulance design, held by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.This paper also introduces the survey, analyzes the survey results, and discusses recommendations for future ambulance patient compartments design.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899.

ABSTRACT
Current ambulance designs are ergonomically inefficient and often times unsafe for practical treatment response to medical emergencies. Thus, the patient compartment of a moving ambulance is a hazardous working environment. As a consequence, emergency medical services (EMS) workers suffer fatalities and injuries that far exceed those of the average work place in the United States. To reduce injury and mortality rates in ambulances, the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate has teamed with the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and BMT Designers & Planners in a joint project to produce science-based ambulance patient compartment design standards. This project will develop new crash-safety design standards and improved user-design interface guidance for patient compartments that are safer for EMS personnel and patients, and facilitate improved patient care. The project team has been working with practitioners, EMS workers' organizations, and manufacturers to solicit needs and requirements to address related issues. This paper presents an analysis of practitioners' concerns, needs, and requirements for improved designs elicited through the web-based survey of ambulance design, held by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. This paper also introduces the survey, analyzes the survey results, and discusses recommendations for future ambulance patient compartments design.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus