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Ambulance Design Survey 2011: A Summary Report.

Lee YT, Kibira D, Feeney AB, Marshall J - J Res Natl Inst Stand Technol (2013)

Bottom Line: Current ambulance designs are ergonomically inefficient and often times unsafe for practical treatment response to medical emergencies.This project will develop new crash-safety design standards and improved user-design interface guidance for patient compartments that are safer for EMS personnel and patients, and facilitate improved patient care.This paper also introduces the survey, analyzes the survey results, and discusses recommendations for future ambulance patient compartments design.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899.

ABSTRACT
Current ambulance designs are ergonomically inefficient and often times unsafe for practical treatment response to medical emergencies. Thus, the patient compartment of a moving ambulance is a hazardous working environment. As a consequence, emergency medical services (EMS) workers suffer fatalities and injuries that far exceed those of the average work place in the United States. To reduce injury and mortality rates in ambulances, the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate has teamed with the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and BMT Designers & Planners in a joint project to produce science-based ambulance patient compartment design standards. This project will develop new crash-safety design standards and improved user-design interface guidance for patient compartments that are safer for EMS personnel and patients, and facilitate improved patient care. The project team has been working with practitioners, EMS workers' organizations, and manufacturers to solicit needs and requirements to address related issues. This paper presents an analysis of practitioners' concerns, needs, and requirements for improved designs elicited through the web-based survey of ambulance design, held by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. This paper also introduces the survey, analyzes the survey results, and discusses recommendations for future ambulance patient compartments design.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Activities to develop the patient compartment design requirements.
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f1-jres.118.019: Activities to develop the patient compartment design requirements.

Mentions: Previous studies in determining the optimal layout of the patient compartment have included use of optimization modeling and similar methods [9,10]. Hignett et al. have identified nine design challenges to improve ambulance safety using information obtained from practitioners through workshops [11]. This project was initiated with a literature review and identified the needs of the EMS community to perform a requirements analysis to support the new design of patient compartments. Figure 1 depicts the project activities. Examples of the activities include state-of-the-art technology and practice assessments followed the literature review [12], interviews with domain experts, standards review and gap analysis, ambulance ride alongs, focus group meetings with manufacturers and practitioners, and workshop with practitioners and federal stakeholders [13]. The project team has solicited needs and requirements and addressed related issues. The highlights of the first phase of the project are:


Ambulance Design Survey 2011: A Summary Report.

Lee YT, Kibira D, Feeney AB, Marshall J - J Res Natl Inst Stand Technol (2013)

Activities to develop the patient compartment design requirements.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487317&req=5

f1-jres.118.019: Activities to develop the patient compartment design requirements.
Mentions: Previous studies in determining the optimal layout of the patient compartment have included use of optimization modeling and similar methods [9,10]. Hignett et al. have identified nine design challenges to improve ambulance safety using information obtained from practitioners through workshops [11]. This project was initiated with a literature review and identified the needs of the EMS community to perform a requirements analysis to support the new design of patient compartments. Figure 1 depicts the project activities. Examples of the activities include state-of-the-art technology and practice assessments followed the literature review [12], interviews with domain experts, standards review and gap analysis, ambulance ride alongs, focus group meetings with manufacturers and practitioners, and workshop with practitioners and federal stakeholders [13]. The project team has solicited needs and requirements and addressed related issues. The highlights of the first phase of the project are:

Bottom Line: Current ambulance designs are ergonomically inefficient and often times unsafe for practical treatment response to medical emergencies.This project will develop new crash-safety design standards and improved user-design interface guidance for patient compartments that are safer for EMS personnel and patients, and facilitate improved patient care.This paper also introduces the survey, analyzes the survey results, and discusses recommendations for future ambulance patient compartments design.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899.

ABSTRACT
Current ambulance designs are ergonomically inefficient and often times unsafe for practical treatment response to medical emergencies. Thus, the patient compartment of a moving ambulance is a hazardous working environment. As a consequence, emergency medical services (EMS) workers suffer fatalities and injuries that far exceed those of the average work place in the United States. To reduce injury and mortality rates in ambulances, the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate has teamed with the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and BMT Designers & Planners in a joint project to produce science-based ambulance patient compartment design standards. This project will develop new crash-safety design standards and improved user-design interface guidance for patient compartments that are safer for EMS personnel and patients, and facilitate improved patient care. The project team has been working with practitioners, EMS workers' organizations, and manufacturers to solicit needs and requirements to address related issues. This paper presents an analysis of practitioners' concerns, needs, and requirements for improved designs elicited through the web-based survey of ambulance design, held by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. This paper also introduces the survey, analyzes the survey results, and discusses recommendations for future ambulance patient compartments design.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus