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Long-Wavelength Beam Steerer Based on a Micro-Electromechanical Mirror.

Kos AB, Gerecht E - J Res Natl Inst Stand Technol (2013)

Bottom Line: Commercially available mirrors for scanning long-wavelength beams are too large for high-speed imaging.There is a need for a smaller, more agile pointing apparatus to provide images in seconds, not minutes or hours.The DSP allows high-speed raster scanning of the incident radiation, which is focused to a small waist onto the 9mm(2), gold-coated, MEMS mirror surface, while simultaneously acquiring an undistorted, high spatial-resolution image of an object.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305.

ABSTRACT
Commercially available mirrors for scanning long-wavelength beams are too large for high-speed imaging. There is a need for a smaller, more agile pointing apparatus to provide images in seconds, not minutes or hours. A fast long-wavelength beam steerer uses a commercial micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) mirror controlled by a high-performance digital signal processor (DSP). The DSP allows high-speed raster scanning of the incident radiation, which is focused to a small waist onto the 9mm(2), gold-coated, MEMS mirror surface, while simultaneously acquiring an undistorted, high spatial-resolution image of an object. The beam steerer hardware, software and performance are described. The system can also serve as a miniaturized, high-performance long-wavelength beam chopper for lock-in detection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photograph of the MEMS Analog Mirror showing two axis gimbaled mirror surface, both pairs of actuating magnets, manufacturer’s directional marks, mounting holes, and 12-pin connector interface.
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f2-jres.118.006: Photograph of the MEMS Analog Mirror showing two axis gimbaled mirror surface, both pairs of actuating magnets, manufacturer’s directional marks, mounting holes, and 12-pin connector interface.

Mentions: The MEMS-based mirror is a TI TALP1000B1 Dual-Axis Analog MEMS Pointing Mirror [7] shown in Fig. 2. Figure 3 shows the MEMS mirror assembled in a custom-machined aluminum enclosure along with its external connectors. This mirror is made of single crystal silicon with no grain boundaries and is coated with gold to create the mirror surface. The specified wavelength range over which suitable reflectivity occurs is 700 nm to 10 µm (mid-infrared). We used the mirror in the far-infrared (350 µm), since in this regime the MEMS gold mirror, with surface roughness of 200 nm, is an even more suitable reflector, relative to the wavelength. The mirror is over 9 mm2 in size, with a radius of curvature specified to be greater than 5 m.


Long-Wavelength Beam Steerer Based on a Micro-Electromechanical Mirror.

Kos AB, Gerecht E - J Res Natl Inst Stand Technol (2013)

Photograph of the MEMS Analog Mirror showing two axis gimbaled mirror surface, both pairs of actuating magnets, manufacturer’s directional marks, mounting holes, and 12-pin connector interface.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487314&req=5

f2-jres.118.006: Photograph of the MEMS Analog Mirror showing two axis gimbaled mirror surface, both pairs of actuating magnets, manufacturer’s directional marks, mounting holes, and 12-pin connector interface.
Mentions: The MEMS-based mirror is a TI TALP1000B1 Dual-Axis Analog MEMS Pointing Mirror [7] shown in Fig. 2. Figure 3 shows the MEMS mirror assembled in a custom-machined aluminum enclosure along with its external connectors. This mirror is made of single crystal silicon with no grain boundaries and is coated with gold to create the mirror surface. The specified wavelength range over which suitable reflectivity occurs is 700 nm to 10 µm (mid-infrared). We used the mirror in the far-infrared (350 µm), since in this regime the MEMS gold mirror, with surface roughness of 200 nm, is an even more suitable reflector, relative to the wavelength. The mirror is over 9 mm2 in size, with a radius of curvature specified to be greater than 5 m.

Bottom Line: Commercially available mirrors for scanning long-wavelength beams are too large for high-speed imaging.There is a need for a smaller, more agile pointing apparatus to provide images in seconds, not minutes or hours.The DSP allows high-speed raster scanning of the incident radiation, which is focused to a small waist onto the 9mm(2), gold-coated, MEMS mirror surface, while simultaneously acquiring an undistorted, high spatial-resolution image of an object.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305.

ABSTRACT
Commercially available mirrors for scanning long-wavelength beams are too large for high-speed imaging. There is a need for a smaller, more agile pointing apparatus to provide images in seconds, not minutes or hours. A fast long-wavelength beam steerer uses a commercial micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) mirror controlled by a high-performance digital signal processor (DSP). The DSP allows high-speed raster scanning of the incident radiation, which is focused to a small waist onto the 9mm(2), gold-coated, MEMS mirror surface, while simultaneously acquiring an undistorted, high spatial-resolution image of an object. The beam steerer hardware, software and performance are described. The system can also serve as a miniaturized, high-performance long-wavelength beam chopper for lock-in detection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus