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The Importance of Dosimetry Standardization in Radiobiology.

Desrosiers M, DeWerd L, Deye J, Lindsay P, Murphy MK, Mitch M, Macchiarini F, Stojadinovic S, Stone H - J Res Natl Inst Stand Technol (2013)

Bottom Line: Despite this, a careful reading of published manuscripts suggests that measurement and reporting of radiation dosimetry and setup for radiobiology research is frequently inadequate, thus undermining the reliability and reproducibility of the findings.The workshop participants arrived at a number of specific recommendations as enumerated in this paper and they expressed the desirability of creating dosimetry standard operating procedures (SOPs) for cell culture and for small and large animal experiments.Other broad areas covered were the need for continuing education through tutorials at national conferences, and for journals to establish standards for reporting dosimetry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899.

ABSTRACT
Radiation dose is central to much of radiobiological research. Precision and accuracy of dose measurements and reporting of the measurement details should be sufficient to allow the work to be interpreted and repeated and to allow valid comparisons to be made, both in the same laboratory and by other laboratories. Despite this, a careful reading of published manuscripts suggests that measurement and reporting of radiation dosimetry and setup for radiobiology research is frequently inadequate, thus undermining the reliability and reproducibility of the findings. To address these problems and propose a course of action, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) brought together representatives of the radiobiology and radiation physics communities in a workshop in September, 2011. The workshop participants arrived at a number of specific recommendations as enumerated in this paper and they expressed the desirability of creating dosimetry standard operating procedures (SOPs) for cell culture and for small and large animal experiments. It was also felt that these SOPs would be most useful if they are made widely available through mechanism(s) such as the web, where they can provide guidance to both radiobiologists and radiation physicists, be cited in publications, and be updated as the field and needs evolve. Other broad areas covered were the need for continuing education through tutorials at national conferences, and for journals to establish standards for reporting dosimetry. This workshop did not address issues of dosimetry for studies involving radiation focused at the sub-cellular level, internally-administered radionuclides, biodosimetry based on biological markers of radiation exposure, or dose reconstruction for epidemiological studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

High dependence of cell survival on dose for different cell types. [Provided by Elizabeth Travis, personal communication.]
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f3-jres.118.021: High dependence of cell survival on dose for different cell types. [Provided by Elizabeth Travis, personal communication.]

Mentions: Biological dose-response variability can be very large even within a single species. This wide range in dose response is influenced by genetic sensitivity as well as environmental factors that influence response to radiation. For molecular responses as well, the data suggest that there is tremendous dose response variability within tissues, species, strains, and cell types. The result is that many radiobiology studies do not require precision of absorbed dose across the study group of more than perhaps 10 %. However, some biological endpoints are very sensitive to the change in the radiation dose and, even when controlling other experimental variables, require much better than 10 % precision in dose to resolve both dose-related and non-dose-related influences. Examples are induction of myelopathy following spinal cord irradiation, GI injury, bone marrow, lung responses and lethality (Fig. 2) and cell survival curves (Fig. 3). The steepness of these lethality curves demonstrates the need for precision within study groups, and the ability to intercompare the different groups requires accuracy in the stated radiation doses that is at least equal to the precision of the measurements. Both Figs. 2 and 3 illustrate that a precise and accurate measurement of dose is critical if the rate of change of the biological effect is to be observed.


The Importance of Dosimetry Standardization in Radiobiology.

Desrosiers M, DeWerd L, Deye J, Lindsay P, Murphy MK, Mitch M, Macchiarini F, Stojadinovic S, Stone H - J Res Natl Inst Stand Technol (2013)

High dependence of cell survival on dose for different cell types. [Provided by Elizabeth Travis, personal communication.]
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487307&req=5

f3-jres.118.021: High dependence of cell survival on dose for different cell types. [Provided by Elizabeth Travis, personal communication.]
Mentions: Biological dose-response variability can be very large even within a single species. This wide range in dose response is influenced by genetic sensitivity as well as environmental factors that influence response to radiation. For molecular responses as well, the data suggest that there is tremendous dose response variability within tissues, species, strains, and cell types. The result is that many radiobiology studies do not require precision of absorbed dose across the study group of more than perhaps 10 %. However, some biological endpoints are very sensitive to the change in the radiation dose and, even when controlling other experimental variables, require much better than 10 % precision in dose to resolve both dose-related and non-dose-related influences. Examples are induction of myelopathy following spinal cord irradiation, GI injury, bone marrow, lung responses and lethality (Fig. 2) and cell survival curves (Fig. 3). The steepness of these lethality curves demonstrates the need for precision within study groups, and the ability to intercompare the different groups requires accuracy in the stated radiation doses that is at least equal to the precision of the measurements. Both Figs. 2 and 3 illustrate that a precise and accurate measurement of dose is critical if the rate of change of the biological effect is to be observed.

Bottom Line: Despite this, a careful reading of published manuscripts suggests that measurement and reporting of radiation dosimetry and setup for radiobiology research is frequently inadequate, thus undermining the reliability and reproducibility of the findings.The workshop participants arrived at a number of specific recommendations as enumerated in this paper and they expressed the desirability of creating dosimetry standard operating procedures (SOPs) for cell culture and for small and large animal experiments.Other broad areas covered were the need for continuing education through tutorials at national conferences, and for journals to establish standards for reporting dosimetry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899.

ABSTRACT
Radiation dose is central to much of radiobiological research. Precision and accuracy of dose measurements and reporting of the measurement details should be sufficient to allow the work to be interpreted and repeated and to allow valid comparisons to be made, both in the same laboratory and by other laboratories. Despite this, a careful reading of published manuscripts suggests that measurement and reporting of radiation dosimetry and setup for radiobiology research is frequently inadequate, thus undermining the reliability and reproducibility of the findings. To address these problems and propose a course of action, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) brought together representatives of the radiobiology and radiation physics communities in a workshop in September, 2011. The workshop participants arrived at a number of specific recommendations as enumerated in this paper and they expressed the desirability of creating dosimetry standard operating procedures (SOPs) for cell culture and for small and large animal experiments. It was also felt that these SOPs would be most useful if they are made widely available through mechanism(s) such as the web, where they can provide guidance to both radiobiologists and radiation physicists, be cited in publications, and be updated as the field and needs evolve. Other broad areas covered were the need for continuing education through tutorials at national conferences, and for journals to establish standards for reporting dosimetry. This workshop did not address issues of dosimetry for studies involving radiation focused at the sub-cellular level, internally-administered radionuclides, biodosimetry based on biological markers of radiation exposure, or dose reconstruction for epidemiological studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus