Limits...
Folic acid supplements and colorectal cancer risk: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Qin T, Du M, Du H, Shu Y, Wang M, Zhu L - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: We herein performed a meta-analysis based on relevant studies to reach a more definitive conclusion.No significant heterogeneity or publication bias was observed.In conclusion, our meta-analysis demonstrated that folic acid supplementation had no effect on colorectal cancer risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT
Numerous studies have investigated the effects of folic acid supplementation on colorectal cancer risk, but conflicting results were reported. We herein performed a meta-analysis based on relevant studies to reach a more definitive conclusion. The PubMed and Embase databases were searched for quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published before October 2014. Eight articles met the inclusion criteria and were subsequently analyzed. The results suggested that folic acid treatment was not associated with colorectal cancer risk in the total population (relative risk [RR] = 1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.82-1.22, P = 0.974). Moreover, no statistical effect was identified in further subgroup analyses stratified by ethnicity, gender, body mass index (BMI) and potential confounding factors. No significant heterogeneity or publication bias was observed. In conclusion, our meta-analysis demonstrated that folic acid supplementation had no effect on colorectal cancer risk. However, this finding must be validated by further large studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Begg’s funnel plot for the publication bias test.Each point represents a separate study for the indicated association.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487230&req=5

f3: Begg’s funnel plot for the publication bias test.Each point represents a separate study for the indicated association.

Mentions: The shape of Begg’s funnel plot did not exhibit any obvious asymmetry (Fig. 3), and the Egger’s test revealed no evidence of publication bias (t = −1.05, P = 0.334).


Folic acid supplements and colorectal cancer risk: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Qin T, Du M, Du H, Shu Y, Wang M, Zhu L - Sci Rep (2015)

Begg’s funnel plot for the publication bias test.Each point represents a separate study for the indicated association.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487230&req=5

f3: Begg’s funnel plot for the publication bias test.Each point represents a separate study for the indicated association.
Mentions: The shape of Begg’s funnel plot did not exhibit any obvious asymmetry (Fig. 3), and the Egger’s test revealed no evidence of publication bias (t = −1.05, P = 0.334).

Bottom Line: We herein performed a meta-analysis based on relevant studies to reach a more definitive conclusion.No significant heterogeneity or publication bias was observed.In conclusion, our meta-analysis demonstrated that folic acid supplementation had no effect on colorectal cancer risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.

ABSTRACT
Numerous studies have investigated the effects of folic acid supplementation on colorectal cancer risk, but conflicting results were reported. We herein performed a meta-analysis based on relevant studies to reach a more definitive conclusion. The PubMed and Embase databases were searched for quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published before October 2014. Eight articles met the inclusion criteria and were subsequently analyzed. The results suggested that folic acid treatment was not associated with colorectal cancer risk in the total population (relative risk [RR] = 1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.82-1.22, P = 0.974). Moreover, no statistical effect was identified in further subgroup analyses stratified by ethnicity, gender, body mass index (BMI) and potential confounding factors. No significant heterogeneity or publication bias was observed. In conclusion, our meta-analysis demonstrated that folic acid supplementation had no effect on colorectal cancer risk. However, this finding must be validated by further large studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus