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Relation of cholesterol metabolism to pediatric gallstone disease: a retrospective controlled study.

Koivusalo A, Pakarinen M, Gylling H, Nissinen MJ - BMC Gastroenterol (2015)

Bottom Line: Surrogate markers of cholesterol synthesis in serum (squalene/cholesterol, cholestenol/cholesterol and lathosterol/cholesterol) were 26-52 % higher in both stone subclasses compared to controls (p < 0.05 for all).In black pigment stone group, stone cholestanol/cholesterol was associated with serum bile acids (r = 0.620, p = 0.018).Black pigment stone group was characterized by deteriorated cholesterol metabolism, and accumulation of cholestanol, campesterol and sitosterol in serum and stones suggesting their participation in pathogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. antti.koivusalo@hus.fi.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cholesterol metabolism may be involved in pediatric gallstone disease. We aimed to reveal cholesterol metabolites and phytosterols and their relation to stone composition of sterols in children having black pigment and cholesterol stones.

Methods: We performed retrospective controlled clinical study, in which we examined parameters of cholesterol metabolism and liver function values in serum (n = 28) and gallstones (n = 46) of consecutively cholecystectomized children. Serum values of age-, body mass index- and sex-matched children (n = 82) and adult gallstones (n = 187) served as controls.

Results: Surrogate markers of cholesterol synthesis in serum (squalene/cholesterol, cholestenol/cholesterol and lathosterol/cholesterol) were 26-52 % higher in both stone subclasses compared to controls (p < 0.05 for all). Respectively, cholestanol/cholesterol and plant sterols campesterol/cholesterol and sitosterol/cholesterol (cholesterol absorption markers) had decreasing order in serum: black pigment stone group > controls > cholesterol stone group (p < 0.05 for all). In black pigment stone group, stone cholestanol/cholesterol was associated with serum bile acids (r = 0.620, p = 0.018). In cholesterol stone group, surrogate markers of cholesterol synthesis in serum (e.g., lathosterol/cholesterol) inversely reflected those of absorption (r-range -0.633--0.706, p-range 0.036-0.015). In cholesterol stone group, serum and stone lathosterol/cholesterol and cholestanol/cholesterol were positively interrelated (r-range 0.727-0.847, p < 0.05 for both).

Conclusions: Gallstone subclasses shared enhanced cholesterol synthesis. Cholesterol stone children were low cholesterol absorbers with intact homeostasis of cholesterol metabolism. Black pigment stone group was characterized by deteriorated cholesterol metabolism, and accumulation of cholestanol, campesterol and sitosterol in serum and stones suggesting their participation in pathogenesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Columns show distribution of 46 cholecystectomized subjects according to gender and stone cholesterol content. Brown pigment stones (cholesterol content 10–35 mg/100 mg stone weight) were excluded in the present study
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Fig1: Columns show distribution of 46 cholecystectomized subjects according to gender and stone cholesterol content. Brown pigment stones (cholesterol content 10–35 mg/100 mg stone weight) were excluded in the present study

Mentions: The whole study group consisted of 46 consecutively cholecystectomized children (median age 13.5 years; range 0.2–18.9; median ISO-BMI 21.5 kg/m2; range 14.4–31.0), of whom 31 were female (Table 1, Fig. 1). All the patients had symptoms related to gallstone disease.Table 1


Relation of cholesterol metabolism to pediatric gallstone disease: a retrospective controlled study.

Koivusalo A, Pakarinen M, Gylling H, Nissinen MJ - BMC Gastroenterol (2015)

Columns show distribution of 46 cholecystectomized subjects according to gender and stone cholesterol content. Brown pigment stones (cholesterol content 10–35 mg/100 mg stone weight) were excluded in the present study
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4487209&req=5

Fig1: Columns show distribution of 46 cholecystectomized subjects according to gender and stone cholesterol content. Brown pigment stones (cholesterol content 10–35 mg/100 mg stone weight) were excluded in the present study
Mentions: The whole study group consisted of 46 consecutively cholecystectomized children (median age 13.5 years; range 0.2–18.9; median ISO-BMI 21.5 kg/m2; range 14.4–31.0), of whom 31 were female (Table 1, Fig. 1). All the patients had symptoms related to gallstone disease.Table 1

Bottom Line: Surrogate markers of cholesterol synthesis in serum (squalene/cholesterol, cholestenol/cholesterol and lathosterol/cholesterol) were 26-52 % higher in both stone subclasses compared to controls (p < 0.05 for all).In black pigment stone group, stone cholestanol/cholesterol was associated with serum bile acids (r = 0.620, p = 0.018).Black pigment stone group was characterized by deteriorated cholesterol metabolism, and accumulation of cholestanol, campesterol and sitosterol in serum and stones suggesting their participation in pathogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. antti.koivusalo@hus.fi.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cholesterol metabolism may be involved in pediatric gallstone disease. We aimed to reveal cholesterol metabolites and phytosterols and their relation to stone composition of sterols in children having black pigment and cholesterol stones.

Methods: We performed retrospective controlled clinical study, in which we examined parameters of cholesterol metabolism and liver function values in serum (n = 28) and gallstones (n = 46) of consecutively cholecystectomized children. Serum values of age-, body mass index- and sex-matched children (n = 82) and adult gallstones (n = 187) served as controls.

Results: Surrogate markers of cholesterol synthesis in serum (squalene/cholesterol, cholestenol/cholesterol and lathosterol/cholesterol) were 26-52 % higher in both stone subclasses compared to controls (p < 0.05 for all). Respectively, cholestanol/cholesterol and plant sterols campesterol/cholesterol and sitosterol/cholesterol (cholesterol absorption markers) had decreasing order in serum: black pigment stone group > controls > cholesterol stone group (p < 0.05 for all). In black pigment stone group, stone cholestanol/cholesterol was associated with serum bile acids (r = 0.620, p = 0.018). In cholesterol stone group, surrogate markers of cholesterol synthesis in serum (e.g., lathosterol/cholesterol) inversely reflected those of absorption (r-range -0.633--0.706, p-range 0.036-0.015). In cholesterol stone group, serum and stone lathosterol/cholesterol and cholestanol/cholesterol were positively interrelated (r-range 0.727-0.847, p < 0.05 for both).

Conclusions: Gallstone subclasses shared enhanced cholesterol synthesis. Cholesterol stone children were low cholesterol absorbers with intact homeostasis of cholesterol metabolism. Black pigment stone group was characterized by deteriorated cholesterol metabolism, and accumulation of cholestanol, campesterol and sitosterol in serum and stones suggesting their participation in pathogenesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus