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Linking Precursor Alterations to Nanoscale Structure and Optical Transparency in Polymer Assisted Fast-Rate Dip-Coating of Vanadium Oxide Thin Films.

Glynn C, Creedon D, Geaney H, Armstrong E, Collins T, Morris MA, O'Dwyer C - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Solution processed techniques such as dip-coating, allow thin films to be rapidly deposited over a large range of surfaces including curved, flexible or plastic substrates without extensive processing of comparative vapour or physical deposition methods.The effects of polymer assisted deposition and changes in solvent-alkoxide dilution on the morphology, structure, optoelectronic properties and crystallinity of vanadium pentoxide thin films was studied using a dip-coating method using a substrate withdrawal speed within the fast-rate draining regime.The effects of the polymer addition was shown to change the crystallized vanadium pentoxide thin films from a granular surface structure to a polycrystalline structure composed of a high density of smaller in-plane grains, resulting in a uniform surface morphology with lower thickness and roughness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Chemistry, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland [2] Micro-Nano Systems Centre, Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Cork, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
Solution processed metal oxide thin films are important for modern optoelectronic devices ranging from thin film transistors to photovoltaics and for functional optical coatings. Solution processed techniques such as dip-coating, allow thin films to be rapidly deposited over a large range of surfaces including curved, flexible or plastic substrates without extensive processing of comparative vapour or physical deposition methods. To increase the effectiveness and versatility of dip-coated thin films, alterations to commonly used precursors can be made that facilitate controlled thin film deposition. The effects of polymer assisted deposition and changes in solvent-alkoxide dilution on the morphology, structure, optoelectronic properties and crystallinity of vanadium pentoxide thin films was studied using a dip-coating method using a substrate withdrawal speed within the fast-rate draining regime. The formation of sub-100 nm thin films could be achieved rapidly from dilute alkoxide based precursor solutions with high optical transmission in the visible, linked to the phase and film structure. The effects of the polymer addition was shown to change the crystallized vanadium pentoxide thin films from a granular surface structure to a polycrystalline structure composed of a high density of smaller in-plane grains, resulting in a uniform surface morphology with lower thickness and roughness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Optical images of a glass substrate being dip-coated over time.The formation process from a liquid solution film to a solid stoichiometric V2O5 thin film through a combination of evaporation, hydrolysis and solidification is shown optically and schematically.
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f7: Optical images of a glass substrate being dip-coated over time.The formation process from a liquid solution film to a solid stoichiometric V2O5 thin film through a combination of evaporation, hydrolysis and solidification is shown optically and schematically.

Mentions: The formation process of the V2O5 thin films during deposition is demonstrated in Fig. 7, where the initial liquid film is first deposited onto the substrate using fast-rate dip-coating to an estimated thickness of ~9.7 μm. The solid V2O5 thin film forms through the evaporation of IPA and the subsequent hydrolysis of the alkoxide and additive into a solid thin film; a process which begins at the top of the deposit and proceeds down the substrate over time. This formation process is shown in the optical images of Fig. 7 and the accompanying movie in the Supplementary Information.


Linking Precursor Alterations to Nanoscale Structure and Optical Transparency in Polymer Assisted Fast-Rate Dip-Coating of Vanadium Oxide Thin Films.

Glynn C, Creedon D, Geaney H, Armstrong E, Collins T, Morris MA, O'Dwyer C - Sci Rep (2015)

Optical images of a glass substrate being dip-coated over time.The formation process from a liquid solution film to a solid stoichiometric V2O5 thin film through a combination of evaporation, hydrolysis and solidification is shown optically and schematically.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4485054&req=5

f7: Optical images of a glass substrate being dip-coated over time.The formation process from a liquid solution film to a solid stoichiometric V2O5 thin film through a combination of evaporation, hydrolysis and solidification is shown optically and schematically.
Mentions: The formation process of the V2O5 thin films during deposition is demonstrated in Fig. 7, where the initial liquid film is first deposited onto the substrate using fast-rate dip-coating to an estimated thickness of ~9.7 μm. The solid V2O5 thin film forms through the evaporation of IPA and the subsequent hydrolysis of the alkoxide and additive into a solid thin film; a process which begins at the top of the deposit and proceeds down the substrate over time. This formation process is shown in the optical images of Fig. 7 and the accompanying movie in the Supplementary Information.

Bottom Line: Solution processed techniques such as dip-coating, allow thin films to be rapidly deposited over a large range of surfaces including curved, flexible or plastic substrates without extensive processing of comparative vapour or physical deposition methods.The effects of polymer assisted deposition and changes in solvent-alkoxide dilution on the morphology, structure, optoelectronic properties and crystallinity of vanadium pentoxide thin films was studied using a dip-coating method using a substrate withdrawal speed within the fast-rate draining regime.The effects of the polymer addition was shown to change the crystallized vanadium pentoxide thin films from a granular surface structure to a polycrystalline structure composed of a high density of smaller in-plane grains, resulting in a uniform surface morphology with lower thickness and roughness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Chemistry, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland [2] Micro-Nano Systems Centre, Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Cork, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
Solution processed metal oxide thin films are important for modern optoelectronic devices ranging from thin film transistors to photovoltaics and for functional optical coatings. Solution processed techniques such as dip-coating, allow thin films to be rapidly deposited over a large range of surfaces including curved, flexible or plastic substrates without extensive processing of comparative vapour or physical deposition methods. To increase the effectiveness and versatility of dip-coated thin films, alterations to commonly used precursors can be made that facilitate controlled thin film deposition. The effects of polymer assisted deposition and changes in solvent-alkoxide dilution on the morphology, structure, optoelectronic properties and crystallinity of vanadium pentoxide thin films was studied using a dip-coating method using a substrate withdrawal speed within the fast-rate draining regime. The formation of sub-100 nm thin films could be achieved rapidly from dilute alkoxide based precursor solutions with high optical transmission in the visible, linked to the phase and film structure. The effects of the polymer addition was shown to change the crystallized vanadium pentoxide thin films from a granular surface structure to a polycrystalline structure composed of a high density of smaller in-plane grains, resulting in a uniform surface morphology with lower thickness and roughness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus