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Persistence of the uncanny valley: the influence of repeated interactions and a robot's attitude on its perception.

Złotowski JA, Sumioka H, Nishio S, Glas DF, Bartneck C, Ishiguro H - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Likeability of a robot was mainly affected by its attitude and this effect was especially prominent for a machine-like robot.On the other hand, merely repeating interactions was sufficient to reduce eeriness irrespective of a robot's embodiment.As a result we urge other researchers to investigate Mori's theory in studies that involve actual human-robot interaction in order to fully understand the changing nature of this phenomenon.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Interface Technology Laboratory New Zealand, University of Canterbury Christchurch, New Zealand ; Hiroshi Ishiguro Laboratory, Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International Kyoto, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The uncanny valley theory proposed by Mori has been heavily investigated in the recent years by researchers from various fields. However, the videos and images used in these studies did not permit any human interaction with the uncanny objects. Therefore, in the field of human-robot interaction it is still unclear what, if any, impact an uncanny-looking robot will have in the context of an interaction. In this paper we describe an exploratory empirical study using a live interaction paradigm that involved repeated interactions with robots that differed in embodiment and their attitude toward a human. We found that both investigated components of the uncanniness (likeability and eeriness) can be affected by an interaction with a robot. Likeability of a robot was mainly affected by its attitude and this effect was especially prominent for a machine-like robot. On the other hand, merely repeating interactions was sufficient to reduce eeriness irrespective of a robot's embodiment. As a result we urge other researchers to investigate Mori's theory in studies that involve actual human-robot interaction in order to fully understand the changing nature of this phenomenon.

No MeSH data available.


The effect of 3 factors on Human Uniqueness. The rating of Human Uniqueness based on attitude and interaction round, and grouped by a robot type.
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Figure 8: The effect of 3 factors on Human Uniqueness. The rating of Human Uniqueness based on attitude and interaction round, and grouped by a robot type.

Mentions: We then proceeded to the 2-dimensional measurement of anthropomorphism to investigate its relation with the uncanny valley. The results related to the model of anthropomorphism proposed by Złotowski et al. (2014) will be discussed in another paper. In line with previous research, we did not find statistically significant main or interaction effects for the HU dimension (see Figure 8).


Persistence of the uncanny valley: the influence of repeated interactions and a robot's attitude on its perception.

Złotowski JA, Sumioka H, Nishio S, Glas DF, Bartneck C, Ishiguro H - Front Psychol (2015)

The effect of 3 factors on Human Uniqueness. The rating of Human Uniqueness based on attitude and interaction round, and grouped by a robot type.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4484984&req=5

Figure 8: The effect of 3 factors on Human Uniqueness. The rating of Human Uniqueness based on attitude and interaction round, and grouped by a robot type.
Mentions: We then proceeded to the 2-dimensional measurement of anthropomorphism to investigate its relation with the uncanny valley. The results related to the model of anthropomorphism proposed by Złotowski et al. (2014) will be discussed in another paper. In line with previous research, we did not find statistically significant main or interaction effects for the HU dimension (see Figure 8).

Bottom Line: Likeability of a robot was mainly affected by its attitude and this effect was especially prominent for a machine-like robot.On the other hand, merely repeating interactions was sufficient to reduce eeriness irrespective of a robot's embodiment.As a result we urge other researchers to investigate Mori's theory in studies that involve actual human-robot interaction in order to fully understand the changing nature of this phenomenon.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Interface Technology Laboratory New Zealand, University of Canterbury Christchurch, New Zealand ; Hiroshi Ishiguro Laboratory, Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International Kyoto, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The uncanny valley theory proposed by Mori has been heavily investigated in the recent years by researchers from various fields. However, the videos and images used in these studies did not permit any human interaction with the uncanny objects. Therefore, in the field of human-robot interaction it is still unclear what, if any, impact an uncanny-looking robot will have in the context of an interaction. In this paper we describe an exploratory empirical study using a live interaction paradigm that involved repeated interactions with robots that differed in embodiment and their attitude toward a human. We found that both investigated components of the uncanniness (likeability and eeriness) can be affected by an interaction with a robot. Likeability of a robot was mainly affected by its attitude and this effect was especially prominent for a machine-like robot. On the other hand, merely repeating interactions was sufficient to reduce eeriness irrespective of a robot's embodiment. As a result we urge other researchers to investigate Mori's theory in studies that involve actual human-robot interaction in order to fully understand the changing nature of this phenomenon.

No MeSH data available.