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State-Issued Identification Cards Reveal Patterns in Adult Weight Status.

Morris DS, Main EC, Harris JK, Moland A, Cude C - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Together, home values, education, race, ethnicity, car commuting, and rural-urban commuting area (RUCA) explained 86% of the variation in BMI among tracts.BMI was lower in areas with higher home values and greater educational attainment, and higher in areas with more workers commuting by car.This demonstrates state-issued identification cards are a promising data source for BMI surveillance and may offer new insight into the association between weight status and economic and environmental factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Community Health, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97201, USA. dmorris@pdx.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: State-issued identification cards are a promising data source for neighborhood-level obesity estimates.

Methods: We used information from three million Oregon state-issued identification cards to compute age-adjusted estimates of average adult body mass index (BMI) for each census tract in the state. We used multivariate linear regression to identify associations between weight status and population characteristics, food access, commuting behavior, and geography.

Results: Together, home values, education, race, ethnicity, car commuting, and rural-urban commuting area (RUCA) explained 86% of the variation in BMI among tracts. BMI was lower in areas with higher home values and greater educational attainment, and higher in areas with more workers commuting by car.

Discussion: Our findings are consistent with other research on socioeconomic disparities in obesity. This demonstrates state-issued identification cards are a promising data source for BMI surveillance and may offer new insight into the association between weight status and economic and environmental factors. Public health agencies should explore options for developing their own obesity estimates from identification card data.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Rural-urban commuting areas in Oregon.
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ijerph-12-06388-f001: Rural-urban commuting areas in Oregon.

Mentions: There are several different schemes for defining urban and rural areas throughout the United States [30,31]. For our study we use Rural-Urban Commuting Areas codes (RUCA) to delineate areas for analysis [32] (Figure 1). Since commuting to work plays an important role in defining a person’s lifestyle, RUCAs, which are based on commuting behavior, are a good classification scheme to use for analysis of average weight status. RUCA designations are available at the Census tract level. RUCAs define metropolitan core, metropolitan commuting, micropolitan, small town, and rural areas. In metropolitan core areas the primary commuting flow is within the urbanized area. Metropolitan commuting areas are adjacent to larger cities, with a large share of workers commuting into the city. These areas are typically thought of as suburbs. Micropolitan areas are centered on urban clusters of 10,000 to 49,999 people; these places are sometimes referred to as large rural towns. Small town areas have urban clusters of 2500 to 9999 people and rural areas have fewer than 2,500 people clustered in one place.


State-Issued Identification Cards Reveal Patterns in Adult Weight Status.

Morris DS, Main EC, Harris JK, Moland A, Cude C - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Rural-urban commuting areas in Oregon.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4483708&req=5

ijerph-12-06388-f001: Rural-urban commuting areas in Oregon.
Mentions: There are several different schemes for defining urban and rural areas throughout the United States [30,31]. For our study we use Rural-Urban Commuting Areas codes (RUCA) to delineate areas for analysis [32] (Figure 1). Since commuting to work plays an important role in defining a person’s lifestyle, RUCAs, which are based on commuting behavior, are a good classification scheme to use for analysis of average weight status. RUCA designations are available at the Census tract level. RUCAs define metropolitan core, metropolitan commuting, micropolitan, small town, and rural areas. In metropolitan core areas the primary commuting flow is within the urbanized area. Metropolitan commuting areas are adjacent to larger cities, with a large share of workers commuting into the city. These areas are typically thought of as suburbs. Micropolitan areas are centered on urban clusters of 10,000 to 49,999 people; these places are sometimes referred to as large rural towns. Small town areas have urban clusters of 2500 to 9999 people and rural areas have fewer than 2,500 people clustered in one place.

Bottom Line: Together, home values, education, race, ethnicity, car commuting, and rural-urban commuting area (RUCA) explained 86% of the variation in BMI among tracts.BMI was lower in areas with higher home values and greater educational attainment, and higher in areas with more workers commuting by car.This demonstrates state-issued identification cards are a promising data source for BMI surveillance and may offer new insight into the association between weight status and economic and environmental factors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Community Health, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97201, USA. dmorris@pdx.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: State-issued identification cards are a promising data source for neighborhood-level obesity estimates.

Methods: We used information from three million Oregon state-issued identification cards to compute age-adjusted estimates of average adult body mass index (BMI) for each census tract in the state. We used multivariate linear regression to identify associations between weight status and population characteristics, food access, commuting behavior, and geography.

Results: Together, home values, education, race, ethnicity, car commuting, and rural-urban commuting area (RUCA) explained 86% of the variation in BMI among tracts. BMI was lower in areas with higher home values and greater educational attainment, and higher in areas with more workers commuting by car.

Discussion: Our findings are consistent with other research on socioeconomic disparities in obesity. This demonstrates state-issued identification cards are a promising data source for BMI surveillance and may offer new insight into the association between weight status and economic and environmental factors. Public health agencies should explore options for developing their own obesity estimates from identification card data.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus