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Are women in Turkey both risks and resources in disaster management?

Işık Ö, Özer N, Sayın N, Mishal A, Gündoğdu O, Özçep F - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: From a global perspective, the universality of gender-related societal issues is particularly significant.Thus, gender-sensitive methods of mitigating and preventing disasters are provided.The main purpose of the article is to contribute to the development of a universal culture that prioritizes gender in disaster management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Istanbul Neighborhood Disaster Volunteers (MAG), Istanbul 34524, Turkey. ozden2010@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
From a global perspective, the universality of gender-related societal issues is particularly significant. Although gender inequality is considered a sociological problem, the large number of female victims in disasters warrants an assessment of disaster management sciences. In this article, related concepts are discussed based on their relevance sociologically and in disaster management to develop a common terminology and examine this complex topic, which is rooted in different social profiles and anthropological heterogeneity throughout the world. A brief history is discussed, and significant examples are provided from different disasters in Turkey to illustrate why a woman-oriented approach should be adopted when evaluating concepts of gender inequality. Observations of disasters have shown that it is important to apply international standards (humanitarian charter and minimum disaster response standards), especially during periods of response and rehabilitation. Relevant factors related to gender should be included in these standards, such as women's health and hygiene, which will be discussed in more detail. A woman-based approach is designed in relation to two aspects: risks and resources. Thus, gender-sensitive methods of mitigating and preventing disasters are provided. The main purpose of the article is to contribute to the development of a universal culture that prioritizes gender in disaster management.

No MeSH data available.


A comparison of different types of disasters in Turkey (after [5]).
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ijerph-12-05758-f001: A comparison of different types of disasters in Turkey (after [5]).

Mentions: Turkey is one of these male-dominant societies and is a country that experiences a high rate of natural disasters. The distribution of significant disasters in Turkey (Figure 1) shows that risks due to earthquakes are high (61%) [5], indicating that Turkey is an earthquake-prone country. Based on the available earthquake catalogue information [6], 1175 destructive historical earthquakes were identified in this area between 2100 B.C. and 1900 A.D. In addition, the catalogue information [7] indicates (Figure 2; faults from [8] and generated by the Generic Mapping Tools [9]) that in the instrumental period (after 1900), 149 destructive earthquakes occurred before the Gölcük-Kocaeli earthquake (17 August 1999, moment magnitude Mw = 7.6) and 97,203 people lost their lives because 578,544 structures were destroyed or severely damaged. According to information from the Ministry of Public Works and Settlement General Directorate of Natural Disasters, in the Gölcük-Kocaeli earthquake, 66,411 houses and 10,901 workplaces were severely damaged, 67,242 houses and 9927 work places were moderately damaged, 80,160 houses and 9712 work places were slightly damaged, and 17,479 people lost their lives [10,11].


Are women in Turkey both risks and resources in disaster management?

Işık Ö, Özer N, Sayın N, Mishal A, Gündoğdu O, Özçep F - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

A comparison of different types of disasters in Turkey (after [5]).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4483670&req=5

ijerph-12-05758-f001: A comparison of different types of disasters in Turkey (after [5]).
Mentions: Turkey is one of these male-dominant societies and is a country that experiences a high rate of natural disasters. The distribution of significant disasters in Turkey (Figure 1) shows that risks due to earthquakes are high (61%) [5], indicating that Turkey is an earthquake-prone country. Based on the available earthquake catalogue information [6], 1175 destructive historical earthquakes were identified in this area between 2100 B.C. and 1900 A.D. In addition, the catalogue information [7] indicates (Figure 2; faults from [8] and generated by the Generic Mapping Tools [9]) that in the instrumental period (after 1900), 149 destructive earthquakes occurred before the Gölcük-Kocaeli earthquake (17 August 1999, moment magnitude Mw = 7.6) and 97,203 people lost their lives because 578,544 structures were destroyed or severely damaged. According to information from the Ministry of Public Works and Settlement General Directorate of Natural Disasters, in the Gölcük-Kocaeli earthquake, 66,411 houses and 10,901 workplaces were severely damaged, 67,242 houses and 9927 work places were moderately damaged, 80,160 houses and 9712 work places were slightly damaged, and 17,479 people lost their lives [10,11].

Bottom Line: From a global perspective, the universality of gender-related societal issues is particularly significant.Thus, gender-sensitive methods of mitigating and preventing disasters are provided.The main purpose of the article is to contribute to the development of a universal culture that prioritizes gender in disaster management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Istanbul Neighborhood Disaster Volunteers (MAG), Istanbul 34524, Turkey. ozden2010@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
From a global perspective, the universality of gender-related societal issues is particularly significant. Although gender inequality is considered a sociological problem, the large number of female victims in disasters warrants an assessment of disaster management sciences. In this article, related concepts are discussed based on their relevance sociologically and in disaster management to develop a common terminology and examine this complex topic, which is rooted in different social profiles and anthropological heterogeneity throughout the world. A brief history is discussed, and significant examples are provided from different disasters in Turkey to illustrate why a woman-oriented approach should be adopted when evaluating concepts of gender inequality. Observations of disasters have shown that it is important to apply international standards (humanitarian charter and minimum disaster response standards), especially during periods of response and rehabilitation. Relevant factors related to gender should be included in these standards, such as women's health and hygiene, which will be discussed in more detail. A woman-based approach is designed in relation to two aspects: risks and resources. Thus, gender-sensitive methods of mitigating and preventing disasters are provided. The main purpose of the article is to contribute to the development of a universal culture that prioritizes gender in disaster management.

No MeSH data available.